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July 14, 1935 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1935-07-14

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, JULY 14, 1935

SUNDAY, JULY 14, 1935

F

Waltz- two people who know how to provide the
sort of social life at which intelligent people can
relax, forget their work for awhile, and come away
with the feeling of an evening well spent.
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DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
Publication in the Bulletin is con-
structive notice to all members of
the University. Copy received at the
office of the Summer Session, Room,
1213 A.H. until 3:30; 11:30 Saturday.

CLASSIFIED
DIRECTORY

The Kansas game department
averted a shortage of cottontails not
jackrabbits, through an embargo,
now lifted.

Washington
Off The Record

By KIRKE SIMPSON
WASHINGTON - Whatever happens to the Guf-
fey-Snyder coal bill, President Roosevelt's re-
quest that it be shoved through regardless of
constitutional doubts, "however reasonable," clear-
ly indicates a definite administration purpose to
seek a Supreme Court showdown at the earliest
possible moment all along the New Deal reform
line.
Special reasons made the Guffey bill situation
that upon which this policy crystallized. As Mr.
Roosevelt pointed out, the bill is a product of "em-
ployers and employes working cooperatively." It
is not a Roosevelt brain-trust issue. More than
that, however, the action the President urges,
doubtful as may be the final fate of the bill,
presumably would avert a coal strike for months.
1,000 DIPFEAING OPINIONS
ET IT IS JUST as obvious that the same con-
stitutional doubts that attach to the Guffey
bill attach also to the labor disputes bill, the social-
security act, and the utility holding company act as
well as to the Tennessee valley project and now
even to the agricultural processing tax system. On
any of these, no doubt, Mr. Roosevelt could find as
he has found as to the Buffey bill, "not ten but a
thousand differing legal opinions." Of any of them
he could say, as he said of the Guffey bill:
"A decision by the Supreme Court ... would be
helpful as indicating, with increasing clarity, the
constitutional limits within which this govern-
ments must operate."
Ever since the NRA decision it has been clear
that the October term of the court may be a crucial
period in national history. What happens then to
purely depression emergency measures, still due
for final constitutional tests and on their way to
the court, would be enough to reshape largely the
political picture now presented.
LETTER IMPLIES POLICY
IN THE NORMAL legal course, it is improbable
that the acts of this session of Congress could
reach the high court for review during the October
term. Only by a definite administration policy of
expediting them, short circuiting the normal pro-
cess, could that come about.
On that basis, it appears likely that a series of
Supreme Court decisions defining limitations of
Federal authority not only under the commerce
clause but as to seeking sociological results via the
tax power is to be expected next winter.

By JOHN SELBY
"MAGICAL CITY; INTIMATE SKETCHES OF
NEW YORK," by Vernon Howe Bailey, with text
by Arthur Bartlett Maurice; (Scribners).
rfHERE has been a plethora of picture books
on New York. recently. Most of them are full
of photographs, and many of the photographs ex-
hibit a tendency toward oddness. Familiar scenes
are shot from unfamiliar angles; one sees the
Brooklyn bridge from the eye of an amoeba (if an
amoeba has an eye), and the Empire State build-
ing leans farther from the perpendicular than
the tower of Pisa, because it was shot from the
back yard of a leather shop underneath.
Which is all very well if one wants a "kick" but
not much good if one wants to see New York as it
looks to one not equipped with telephoto lenses for
eyes, and a rotogravure press with which to record
his impressions.
For a year or two Vernon Howe Bailey has been
furnishing the New York Sun a drawing a day,
all of New York scenes, and all drawn in reason-
able perspective. Many of these have been ex-
tremely good, and few really dull. Now a large
number of the better ones have been collected in a
book called "Magical City," and Arthur Bartlett
Maurice has written brief descriptions for each of
the drawings.
It is a treasure for the New Yorker who really
loves his city, for the stranger who wants to re-
member New York, and for those who just like
looking at pictures. Mr. Bailey's taste is singularly
catholic; Fraunces' Tavern shares space with an
uptown subway station, and the famous and beau-
tiful home for Irish immigrant girls on Battery
park is hard by a gorgeous view of the interior of
the Cathedral of Saint John the Divine.
Which is all very nice. There is a further dif-
ference between "Magical City" and the usual
New York picture book. It is that as an artist,
Mr. Bailey has been able, legitimately, to focus
his "reader's" eye on what it should see. By
eliminating, or softening, the inevitable distrac-
tions, he has given the book both life and space.

I

As Others See It

jThe SOAP BOX

~1

Letters published in this column should not be
construed as expressing the editorial opinion of The
Daily. Anonymous contributions will be disregarded.
The names of communicants will, however, be regarded
as confidential upon request. Contributors aregasked
to be brief, the editor reserving the right to condense
all letters of over 300 words and to accept or reject
letters upon the criteria of general editorial importance
and interest to the campus.
On Being Wet
Dear Mr. Editor:
I see that familiar old summer sport, the campus
recreation of "Dodge!.the Sprinkler, or I Didn't, I'm
Soaked" is with us again.
The daily watering of the campus green by the
B and G boys may have its mixed benefits but as
for me I'd rather see the grass brown or have the
watering done at night. Of course some may get a
vicarious pleasure and even some heat relief from
the sightly stream, but I don't.
Just today, with the heat (must I say humidity)
at its worst I was walking along faithfully perus-
ing that delectable bit of mid-summer reading,
"Decline of the West," in fact so oblivious to all
worldly care that I completely neglected to time my
passage by the circulating spray. As a result I have
decided to make a polo shirt and tennis trunks like

Iw
The Fourth Year Of RFC
THE RECONSTRUCTION Finance Corporation,
legally created by the President's signature on
Jan. 23, 1932, is now almost three and a half years
old. Dedicated to a good Samaritan career, it has
had a fairly exciting life. True, its lines have not
fallen exactly in the pleasant places conceived by
its sponsor. Mr. Hoover, but then events always
have had an impish genius for scrambling "the
best-laid plans of mice and men."
When he signed the bill, Mr. Hoover explained
that "its purpose is to stop deflation in agriculture
and industry . . . It is not created," he asserted,
"for the aid of big industries or big banks. Such
institutions are amply able to take care of them-
selves." But today, in the fourth year of RFC,
the Federal government is a stockholder in 33 of the
country's 100 giant banks. It is also a partner
in 6,400 of the 14,400 smaller banks. Such is the
report of the Chicago Tribune, which has com-
pleted a second investigation of the corporation's
activities. The Tribune finds that the "banks
are slowly buying back their independence"; that
is, they are paying off the government's loans, as
revealed by the fact that "whereas the RFC held
stock in 39 of the 100 largest banks on March 31,
1934, it now holds stock in only 33." The gov-
ernment's investment in the smaller banks is placed
at one billion dollars.
Meantime, the "big industries," which Mr. Hoo-
ver thought were so "amply able to take care
of themselves," have found the government to be
"the shadow of a great rock in a weary land." The
railroads have borrowed nobly from RFC, though
not so gallantly as they would have liked to do.
The Tribune has not calculated the total of the
government's railroad loans, but just as this cor-
poration has made Uncle Sam our biggest banker,
so it has made him our biggest railroad operator,
or investor.
There were those who feared, at its birth, that
the RFC was not going to be merely a big brother
to the little fellows in distress, as Mr. Hoover fondly
foresaw. There were those who felt that, when
the government set itself up as a money lender,
saying, "Come unto me all ye that labor and
are heavy-laden," that the invitation would be en-
thusiastically accepted - by the great and the
small, the powerful and the weak, the rich and
the poor, the quick and the dead. The Post-Dis-
patch was among the number to suspect that here
was an adventure in socialism, launched by an ad-
ministration and lauded by a constituency that
looked with trembling and loathing on anything
wearing a Socialist tag.
But that is what the RFC was, and is.
-St. Louis Post-Dispatch.
Europe Ahead In Television
EUROPEAN COUNTRIES are forging ahead of
the United States in television. Great Britain
has officially begun a definite program, operated
through the government-controlled British Broad-
casting Corporation. Dictator Adolf Hitler is
building a modern station in Berlin and will take
his messages to the people in person within a few
months. In Italy, Marconi is experimenting with
a new kind of wave which can be sent for long
distances- thus overcoming one of television's
main stumbling-blocks.
-Review of Reviews.
How many college students were pledged to fra-
ternities and sororities this fall? About 75,000, ac-

SUNDAY, JULY 14, 1935 1
VOL. XVI No. 18
Summer Session Mixed Chorus:
The Chorus will, sing this evening
at 7:15. Please report on time at the
flag pole in front of the Library.
David Mattern.
Summer Session Symphony: The
Orchestra will play a short program
this evening at 7:00. Please report
on time at the flag pole in front of
the library.
David Mattern..
Congregational Church: 10:30 Ser-
vice of worship with sermon by Mr.
Heaps. Subject, "Standing Any-
thing that Can Happen to One." An-
nis Dexter Gray, soloist.
From 6 to 7 o'clock in the evening
a reception to Congregational Sum-
mer students will be held in the par-
lors of the church. Mr.' Heaps will
give his illustrated lecture on "The
Grand Canyop." Summer students
cordially invited.
Allison Ray Heaps.
Episcopal Students: The regular
Fellowship Hour for summer school
students will be a picnic this evening
at the cottage of Mrs. Henry Douglas
at Cavanaugh Lake. Cars will leave
St. Andrew's Church at six o'clock.
Each person is asked to bring ten
cents to help defray expenses. Par-
ticular attention is called to the
change. of the regular time to six
o'clock tonight.
Saint Andrew's Episcopal Church:
Services of worship today are: 8:00
a.m. Holy Communion; 11:00 a.m.,
Children's Hour; 11:00 a.m. Morning
Prayer and Sermon by the Reverend
Henry Lewis. The men and boys
choir will sing for the last time for
the summer at the eleven o'clock ser-
vice this morning.
Coming Events
Daily Vacation School: A vacation
school for children from eight to
fourteen will begin Monday morning
at nine o'clock at St. Andrew's
Church.
First Baptis't Church. Morning
Worship, 10:45 a.m., Rev. R. Edward
Sayles, Minister, will preach. Sub-
ject, "Freedom Through Truth." No
morning study hour for students, but
all are invited to come to Guild
House, 503 E. Huron Street, at 6:00
p.m. Rev. H. R. Chapman, Minister
for University students, will speak on,
"A Modern View of the Bible." Meet-
ing closes in time for the Campus
Vespers on University Campus.
Methodist Episcopal Church: Sun-
day 10:45 a.m., Morning Worship
Service. Dr. C. W. Brashares has
chosen as a sermon subject, "The Key
To Prayer."
Stalker Hall for University Stud-
ents and Friends: Today, 6:00 p.m.
Informal devotional hour for Uni-
versity students and their friends.
Professor Howard Y. McClusky, of
the School of Education, will speak on
"Religion and Mental Health." This
will be the fourth in a series of pro-
grams on the theme, "Rethinking
Religion." Refreshments and fel-
lowship will follow the meeting.
Evening Service at Unitarian
Church, Address by minister, "Mod-
ern Men's Religion." Solo by Carl
Nelson. Preceding the service at
6:45 a light supper will be served.
Light supper for summer students
at Unitarian Church, State and Hur-
on Streets at 6:45 p.m.
8:15 - Candlelight service - top-
ic, "Modern Man's Religion," by Rev.
H. P. Marley. Poetry, music and de-
votions.
H. P. Marley.

-~I
CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
Place advertisements with Classified
Advertising Department. Phone 2-1214.
The classified columns close at five
o'clock previous to day of insertion.
Box numbers may be secured at no
extra charge.
Cash in advance 11c per reading lime
(on basis of five average words to
line) for one or two insertions.
10c per reading line for three or
more insertions.
Minimum 3 lines per insertion.
Telephone ratew -1eper reading line
for one or two insertions.
14c per reading line for three or
more insertions.
10% discount if paid within ten days
from the date of last insertion.
Minimum three lines per insertion.
By contract, per line -2 lines daily, ono
month....................8c
4. lines E.O.D., 2 months...........c
2 lines daily, college year.......7c
4 lines E.O.D., college year ........7c
100 lines used as desired.........9c
300 lines used as desired.........8c
1,000 lines used as desired.......70
2,000 lines used as desired ....
The above rates are per reaaing line.
based on eight reading lines per inch.
Ionic type, upper and lower case. Add
Bc per line to above rates for all capital
letters. Add 6c per line to above for
bold face, upper and lower case. Add
1Oc per line to above rates for bold face
capital letters.
The above rates are for 7% point
type.

- Today - Monda Tuesday -
JEAN HARLOW
"RECKLESS"
BARBARA STANWYCI
"WOMAN IN RED"
- - Next Attraction
plus
"I AM A THIEF"
MAJESTIC
25c to 2 P.M. 35c after 2 P.M
Shows Continuous
COMICOLOSSAL - that's it!
BERT ROB'T
WHEELER WOOLSEY
"THE NIT WITS"
(It's all in fun and nuttier
than fruitcake)
Added Joy
"Top Form" Schoolboy Rowe
"Taking the Blame" Betty Boop
"Los Angeles" Travelogue
LATEST NEWS

LAUNDRY
LAUNDRY. 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. lx
PERSONAL laundry service. We take
individual Interest in the laundry
problems of our customers. Girls'
silks, wools, and fine fabrics guar-
anteed. Men's shirts our specialty.
Call for and deliver. Phone 5594.
611 E. Hoover. 3x
EXPERIENCED LAUNDRESS doing
student and family washings. Will
call for and deliver. Phone 4863.
..2x.
STUDENT Hand Laundry. Prices rea-
sonable. Free delivery. Phone 3006.
4x
FOR SALE
ORIGINAL ETCHING BY DUBAIN-
NE-(FRENCH ARTIST) SCENE
LUXEMBURG GARDENS - $10
FRAMED. U L R I C H'S BOOK-
STORE, CORNER EAST AND
SOUTH UNIVERSITY.
LOST AND FOUND

- Wednesday -
Leo Carillo

Two Features -
"San ers All"

25c to' 2 P.M. 35c after 2 P.M.
Shows Continuous
A Great Star ... and a
New Star. .. together!

f

11

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v ...__.:.

LOST: During first week of Summer
Session, glasses in brown case. Hex-
agon shaped frames, left lens tinted.
Reward. Box 2.
Southern Railway train No. 38, for-
merly the Crescent Limited, runs from
Atlanta to Washington, a distance
of more than 700 miles, with only
nine stops.,

Bill's on Another Gay
W I L L I A M
ECAPA DE"
With M-G-M Cast
LUISE CE
RANERC(
EA N NOVELTY
IVORGAN
VIRGINIA
R R U C E NEWS
Monday Owl Show
"WEST POINT OF THE AIR"
WALLACE BEERY

'

r

All Types of
DANCING
Taught daily. Private
lessons only. Terrace
Garden Studio. Wuerth
Theatre Bldg. Ph. 9695

SWIM PICNIC
N EWPORT
BATHING BEACH
PORTAGE LAKE
Constantly Changing Waher

-1

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Lydia MENDELSSOHN Theatre
OPENI G WEDNESDAY

John Drink'ivater's English Rural Comedy
"BIRD IN HAN"
JULY 17ri8, 19i, '20G8:30 iP.M."

Grant's and Miss Jacobs'

of my new linen
-Jesse Fein.

i

Admission: 75c, 50c, 35c

SCREEN

,I

AT THE MAJESTIC
"THE NITWITS"
An RKO -Radio picture, starring Bert Wheeler
and Robert Woolsey, with Fred Keating, Betty
Grable, Evelyn Brent, and Erik Rhodes, Also a
Grantland Rice Sportlight, a travelogue in color
about Los Angeles, a Betty Boop cartoon, and a
Hearst newsreel.
Some of the wildest slapstick comedy in months
is all you'll find in "The Nitwits," and you'll have
to wait until the end for that.
Intended as a spook comedy, the mystery serves
only as a stooge for the comedy and makes the
first half of the picture pretty slow.
The Black Widow Spider, an unknown menace,
murders the head of a song-publishing concern,
although the corpse had engaged a private de-
tective to guard him after threatening notes.
New blackmail notes come and finally Wheeler
and Woolsey with their "truth machine," a group
of Negro crap-shooters, the Spider (easily iden-
tified) and his gang, and a force of policemen
are running wild through an office building.
Various ones dress up as skeletons, drop flower
pots on each others' heads, and throw tennis balls
in people's mouths until the murderer is finally
caught.,
Wisecracks are below par, and excellent situa-

Michigan League Library: This Li-R
brary will be closed Sunday, July 14
and Sunday, July 21, but will be open
Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday
(Continued on Page 4)

RESERVATIONS NOW

PH-lONE 6300

0

man

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A box of Genuine Etched Stationery, containing 48 sheets and 24
envelopes, stamped with the Michigan seal and your choice of either
Angell Hall or The Union stamped on cream paper, in brown ink.
ReOw 49c
and--
F NTA INPE NCLOSE -OUTS
An odd lot of excellent pens of standard makes including Shaeffer,
Parker and Wahl.
Reg. price $2 to $10. Now 40 %off.

III

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