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July 28, 1936 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1936-07-28

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;PAU L TWV
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Official Publication of the Summer Session

THE 811PMCA N n A'TT.V

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on a different basis entirely? Just how is he going
to administer cash benefits to farmers? For an-
swers, we can await subsequent speeches and hope
that he will be somewhat more definite then. But
we suspect he will keep beating around the bush.
That is the way we see Governor Landon's ac-
ceptance speech at its face value, but there is
a large question in our minds as to whether the
Republican nominee will really try to do what he
says he will. It is one thing to declare for this
or that, but it is another to try and accomplish
this or that with Hearst whispering in one ear,
the American Liberty League in the other, and
the NationalAssociation of Manufacturers hinting
to him that he should crack down on labor or
that all those on relief are fakers. And all these
interests, interests which have shown themselves
to be for reaction, are composed of those men who
are putting Governor Landon in the race. w
Unless Governor Landon is a stronger man than
z he has given us reason to believe, the United
States will be in for a restoration of the conditions
of 1929 if the Republican party is successful.

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mistic vegetarian and teacher of football to Cen-
tral American Indians. Is this fair to the humble
canine who may well have been a fresh avatar n1
--shall we say-Vishnu? The pleasure of def end-
ing this thesis must be foregone, in order to de-
plore, once more and finally the haste of reviewers
to deny or overlook Anthony Beavis's conscious-
ness of the need for fundamental social reorgani-
zation. Huxley's Samson, though eyeless, sees
more than the Philistines who contemplate him.
-K.D.B.
Hospitality At The League
To the Editor.

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CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

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A YXilA. ..4 A .Lx . II 371 .3 L dU L TUE6J~1)A , JULYX 28,16

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THE FORUM

EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR...........THOMAS E. GROEHN
ASSOCIATE EDITOR ..............THOMAS H. KLEENE
Editorial Director ..................Marshall D. Shulman
7ramatic Critic ........................ John W. Pritchard
Assistant Editors: Clinton B. Conger, Ralph W. Hurd,
Joseph S. Mattes, Elsie A. Pierce, Tuure Tenander, Jewel!
W. Wuef'fei.
.eporters: Eleanor Barc, Donal Burns, Mary Delnay, M. E.
Graban, John Hilpert, Richard E. Lorch, Vincent Moore,
Elsie Roxborough, William Sours, Dorothea Staebler,
Betty Keenan.

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Letters published in this column should not be
construed as expressing the editorial opinion of The
Daily. Anonymous contributions will be disregarded.
The names of communicants will, however, be regarded
as confidential upon request. Contributors are asked
to be brief, the editors reserving the right to condense
all letters of more than 300 words and to accept or
reject letters upon the criteria of general editorial
importance and interest to the campus.
A Review Of Reviewers
To the Editor:
Aldous Huxley seems to have presented a puzzle
of serious proportions to the reviewers of "Eyeless
in Gaza." And Miss Bromage and Mr. Pritchard
seem to me to be among the puzzled ones in their
Daily reviews of July 24 and 25.

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 2-1214
BUSINESS MANAGER..........GEORGE H. ATHERTC
CREDITS MANAGER ...................JOHN R. PA]
Circulation Manager..................J. Cameron Hi
Office Manager .-.'.............Robert Lod

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Topeka
Dust Storm ...

G OVERNOR LANDON attacked Mr.
Roosevelt's most vulnerable policy
when he reaffirmed his allegiance to the constitu-
tion as a means of gaining his ends. Although
far behind the times in many ways, the consti-
tution deserves the reverence generally accorded
it, and Mr. Roosevelt has too often belittled the
document and sought to pass laws that are plainly
not within the Congress' power under the present
constitution.
But gratifying as this principle is, we should be
concerned more with what Mr. Landon will do
in his constitutional way. The austerity of the
constitution can afford to be softened for the
good of the nation.g

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The striking thing of Mr. Landon's speech is
that he is in accord witf Roosevelt on almost every
major issue. In attacking the Roosevelt adminis-
tration of relief, he says there is no future on
relief rolls. But later he recognizes that relief
is essential "to those who need relief." The differ-
ence between the Roosevelt policy and the Landon
policy is explained by the extravagance charged
to the administration; .Landon's economies will
not be taken out of "the allotment to the unem-
ployed. We will take them from the hides of
political exploiters."

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The great problem in relief is not economy but
actual relief, although economy should be re-
spected; but an administration that is slashing
to the bone, as Landon's would probably be, will
not take care of even the needy. Moreover Landon,
although he admits the temporary qualities of
Roosevelt's acts and implies their expediency, fails
to discount his criticism for the vastness of the
relief administration. It would take America's
best profit-seeking business men to run relief the
way Landon claims he will run it.
As to Governor Landon's farm policy, it corre-
sponds to that of President Roosevelt. True, the
governor deprecates the AAA scarcity program,
but that is a thing of the past anyway. Landon
would institute a program of soil conservation,
which Roosevelt has already adopted. (It might
be worth mentioning in passing that the Kansas
soil conservation program, devised by Mr. Landon,
was invalidated by the supreme court of Kansas.
Even the best of men misinterpret constitutions).
It is presumed that Mr. Landon will work for
higher tariffs, because "our farmers are entitled
to all the home market they can supply without
injustice to the consumer."
If Governor Landon- knew, as every educated
person today knows, that a high tariff puts up a
barrier to exporting (because it hampers free,
exchange of goods), he would realize that he is
advocating a policy diametrically opposed to his
ends of increasing trade.
If Mr. Landon is elected, Labor will probably
experience its worst setback in recent times. "The
right of labor to organize," the Republican can-
didate says, "means to me the right of employes
to join any type of union they prefer, whether
it covers their plant, their craft or their indus-
try."

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To be classified as surrealist on one day and
dadaist on the next is rare distinction for Mr.
Huxley if not for his reviewers. What Miss Bro-
mage mistakenly terms surrealism is Mr. Hux-
ley's method of precise, if not complete, biological
description.This in turn stemmed originally from
Mr. Huxley's now outmoded 'entomological view
of man.' I had thought that the equation of biology
with realism had not been seriously advocated
since the decline of Zola's naturalism, save per-
haps by "True Confessions."
As for the dadaism which Mr. Pritchard-claims
to find in Huxley's "repetitive and contrapuntal
use of the word 'peace'," I should like to refer
the reviewer to the Psalms of David for a parallel
in thought-content as well as in style. Now David
too may have been influenced by dadaism, but I
should like to have more proof before agreeing to
so startling a hypothesis. Similarly with Huxley.
But it is not these minor misreadings of the text
with which I am mainly concerned here. Any
sensitive reader of "Point Counterpoint" and of
"'Brave New World" must have felt that the auc-
torial eyes which peered so piercingly and "sci-
entifically" through the microscope upon impaled
human insects were the eyes of a moralist, though
the scientist made the report of laboratory find-
ings. The same reader must have felt certain
that ultimately the moralist would speak. There
was alwayes a fear on my part that the moralist
might silence the scientist completely, and, in the
role of puritan, might sweep both microscope and
specimens into the waste jar, while he preached
to a lost world.
This, thanks be to the genes of Thomas Henry
Huxley, his grandson, the novelist, has not done.
It is true that Miss Bromage, in speaking of 'the
peculiarly vicious circle of men and women' in
which Huxley's hero, Anthony Beavis, is placed,
seems to decide the role of puritan for the au-
thor. Why 'vicious'? Doesn't this violate thet
new attitude of love for humanity which Huxley
rediscovers in the novel? These men and women
are lost, they lack a sense of direction and of
human worth, they are seeking feverishly the an-1
esthesia of novel experience. But they are hardly
more vicious than any other modern group; than,e
et us say, Michigan's summer school enrollment,
though they are more interesting in their fund
of information and their facility of expression..I
Miss Bromage says elsewhere in her review thati
t is time to stop speaking of Huxley's obscene ap-X
proach, I agree. And is it not also time to stopc
speakiuig self-righteously of 'vicious' people.
What scientist Huxley adds to his microscopet
n his new novel is a stereoscopic attachment which
nables him (and us) to see his insects in a newr
dimension of love and fellow-feeling. And thec
nsects turn out to be men-lovable fellow-men,
This is an enormous discovery for Anthony Beavis,c
and the story of his spiritual struggle to this newv
nsight constitutes a great novel. To speak, as Mr.t
ritchard does, of surrender to emotion and de-u
ertion of reason is to hide the all-important facty
f Huxley's attempt to fertilize a sterile reason bya
ategrating with it a 'mystical' (if Mr. Pritchardv
wishes it that way) view of the whole man. Anda
his whole man is a feeling, thinking, loving socialj
reature who feels (knows) with all of himself-
he unity in difference of mankind.-
Why will not reviewers see further that Huxley
s -not opposing the ends of radical social reform? w
'hey will insist on seeing in his program a denial b
f "superficial Modern Utopias" and only an in- t
rument of individual regeneration, of "individual b
ictory over modern paganism." But Huxley has a
nthony Beavis declare repeatedly that the ends c
f his program are those of Communism. (Example r
-p. 247.) It is the forceful means of Communism r
which he finds the seeds of self-defeat for those s
nds, and which he denies. Beavis, the sociologist,
es well that a radical social readjustment must
Dme to match economic and technological change
nd he says so. (p. 341 et seq.) But beneficial and o
hilanthropic ends can only be won by beneficial l
nd philanthropic means, reasons our hero, and t
aus he evokes the active pacifism of Buddha, Lao
ze, Jesus and Gandhi as the proper and con-
nant method. World peace is the angle of the
hole problem on which he determines to con- "
entrate.

For two nays every Southern Student would say
" Are you going to the Watermelon party and
dance. I am, aren't you?" "Sure, wouldn't miss it
for a dime."
. Sohere these two girls from the south go, look-
ing forward to a good old-fashioned social evening.
Now Say! That watermelon part was fine, and
I'm glad I'm from the South since Dr. Purdom is;
so genial, so hospitable, so friendly. But Oh! Boy
just wait until you hear about the breaks this
green, country girl from the South makes at the
dance.
On our way to the dance we picked up another
girl from the South and one from the "North" (She
ought to know). If you have ever been in the south
and seen a bunch of happy girls together; well!
you will know just how much laughter and fun
was going on when we climbed the steps entering
the dance hall. We saw a mighty pretty girl sit-
ting at the table to take up tickets but that meant
nothing to us. We are from the South and girls
never pay to go to dances in the South. But this
young lady looked at us and said with her eyes,
"Well, aren't you going to pay the price?" Finally
she did say, "Twenty-five cents, please." This
humble writer said to her companion, "Do you
want to go a quarter's worth?" Finally we did so,
we deposited our 25 cents. I hated powerful bad
to spend that quarter just to look at people dance
but I did. When this little quarter was deposited
we entered that beautiful lobby or lounge where
dozens of people were standing, sitting, talking,
smoking. We took a love seat.
Presently we realized that we were hearing
strains of music. One girl said, "Why don't we go
in to the ballroom and see them dance? We cer-
tainly don't want to hang around here." So here
we go. I don't know why your most humble writer
pushed herself in ahead of some of the others ex-
cept that she may have been a little more anxious
tq see the beautiful dresses floating around the
room guided by a tall, dark and handsome. I got
by the door where several young men were stand-
ing and so did my two friends. (One of them had
decided that she didn't want to see it a quarter's
worth). In just another minute I am sure we'
would have seen at least one of those dresses float-
ing over the floor but one of the young men we
had succeeded in passing says in rather an an-
noyed voice, "Just a minute, no one allowed to-
night except couples." Well-about that time my
southern-something got up and I say, "We came
to see them dance. What do you think we paid a
quarter for?" "Let's go back and get our quarter."
And back we went. Don't think for a minute that
I was too timid and country-from the South-
to ask for my quarter. No sir ree! We didn't need
to pay a quarter to sit in a love seat; we can do
that at home.
Young people, come south sometime and let
us take you to a dance honoring you. LADIES
FREE.
-Southern Gal.

THE DARDANELLES AGREEMENT
(From St. Louis Post-Dispatch)
The new Dardanelles agreementI
signifies that Kemal Ataturk's coun-
try is no longer either "the Terrible
Turk" or "the Sick Man of Europe,"
as it has been described at various
times in its history. That Turkey
asked the other signatory Powers'
permission instead of rearming the
straits in defiance of the post-war
treaties, as Germany did under simi-
lar circumstances, cancels the first
appellation. The step, in fact, gained
for Turkey a more favorable hearing
than would have been accorded oth-
erwise, especially since the other
Powers took delight inpraising Tur-
key as a backhanded rebuke to Hit-
ler. That the delegates at Mon-
treux unanimously recognized Tur-
key's rights and viewed her claims
respectfully proves that the stigma of
the second sobriquet has been re-
moved by the nation's reorganization
under Ataturk.
Turkish ambitions thus are ful-
filled, and long-cherished Russian
hopes get a partial reward, by the
terms of the agreement. Russia wins
the right to send as many warships!
as she pleases from the Black Sea in-
to the Mediteranean, while other na-
tions are permitted to send no more
than 30,000 tons from the Mediter-
anean into the Black Sea. This, with
concessions to her merchant shipping
gives Russia a virtual lease on the
"warm-water port," whose lack dic-
tated Czarist foreign policies for so
many years.
The Dardanelles agreement gives a
stimulus to the weakened League of
Nations by investing that body with
authority to determine under what;
conditions in time of war Turkey
may close the Dardanelles. En-
couragement to the method of con-
ference is given, too, by the fact that
what might have been a prolonged
and acrimonious controversy under
other conditions has been settled
amicably by a meeting of the Powers
concerned.
Pairings Announced For
Women's Tennis Tourney
The pairings of first round of the
women's singles in the campus tennis
tournament have been announced.
Esmah Orcutt is to play Edna Cole;
Marion Reed, Maurine Bowling; and
Elsie Michalke, Evelyn Seward.
The first round is to be played off
by Saturday night, Aug. 1. Rules'for
the tournament and the list of en-
tries are posted on the board at the
Women's Athletic Building.

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FOR RENT
FOR RENT: Furnished and unfur-
nished apartments. Phone 8507.
18
EMERY RECAPTURED
CHARLO6TE, July 27.-(A)-Jack
Emery, 17, of Nashville, Mich., who
escaped last night from the Eaton
county jail, was recaptured this af-
ternoon. in a wheat field near Nash-
ville. At the approach of the officers,
he threw down a pistol he had taken
from the jail office and gave up.
DANCING
Class & individual in-
struction in all types
of dancing. Teachers
course. Open daily dur-
ing Summer Session.
10 A.M. to 9 P.M.
Phone 9695
Terrace Garden Studio
wuerth Theatre Bldg.
-- Today and Wednesday
It's Shirley's Best!
SHIRLEY TEMPLE
"THE POOR LITTLE
RICH GIRL"
withf
ALICE FAYE
GLORIA STUART
JACK HALEY
H also T
SHORT FEATURES

FOR RENT: Single room for women.
Second floor. 509 E. Madison.
Phone 4546.
FOR SALE
SCOTTISH TERRIER PUPS: A.K.C.
6 weeks old, healthy, sturdy, splen-
did breeding. One female, 7 months
old, all reasonably priced to sell.
1313 5 State.
FOR SALE: 31 Chrysler coupe.
Rumble seat. Splendid condition.
Phone 2-1070 Mrs. Leaf. 20
LAUNDRY
LAUNDRY WANTED: Student Co-
ed. Men's shirts 10c. Silks, wools,
our specialty. All bundles done sep-
arately. No markings. Personal sat-
isfaction guaranteed. Call for and
deliver. Phone 5594 any time until
7 o'clock. Silver Laundry, 607 E.
Hoover. 3X
LAUNDRY 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. 1x

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Primivitism And Civilization
To the Editor:
At a time when- dictatorships are fighting de-
mocracies-barbarism vs. civilization-it is for-
tunate that there are books which treat this sub-
ject in masterly fashion. Such a stimulating book
is The Revolt of the Masses by a Spanish writer,
Jose Ortegay Gasset. Here is a passage from the
book on primitivism and civilization: "Nature is
always with us. It is self-supporting. In the for-
ests of nature we can be savage with impunity.
We can likewise resolve never to cease being so,
without further risk than the coming of other
peoples who are not savage. But, in principle,
it is possible to have peoples who are perennially
primitive. Breyssig has called these "the peoples
of perpetual dawn," those who have remained in a
motionless, frozen twilight, which never progresses
towards midday."
"This is what happens in the world which is
mere Nature. But it does not happen in the world
of civilization which is ours. Civilization is not
'just there,' it is not self-suporting. It is artifi-
cial and requires the artist or the artisan. If you
want to make use of the advantages of civilization,
but are not prepared to concern yourself with the
upholding of civilization-you are done. In a trice
you find yourself left without civilization. Just
a slip, and when you look around everything has
vanished into air.. . The jungle is always primitive
and, vice versa, everything primitive is mere
jungle." -M. Levi
Add Twice-Told (but Still-Good) Tales:
This happened not too recently at a church
wedding in a not too nearby town. The young
bride walked slowly down the aisle. As she reached
he platform before the altar her dainty foot
brushed a potted flower, upsetting it. She looked
at the stilled church gravely, then raised her large
child-like blue eyes to the sedate face of the
minister. Then in clear bell-like tones that
reached every part of the auditorium distinctly,
he said, "That's a hell of a place to put a lily."
--R. J. Schutz in the Emington (Ill.) Joker.
Now that Mrs. Dionne has produced a solitary
offspring public interest in the family will probably
ag because they have fallen off so markedly from
;he 1934 production peak.
--The Summer Texan.
William B. Shields, 28, leader of a movement to
clean up" Atlantic City:
" hnfnrn +this is ynear n1.,, Will1 canrp nivin

- Now Playing -
TEDDY
BREWER
and His
ORCHESTRA
SUNDAY NIGHT
Admission
25c Your pal free.
DANCING FREE
FROM ANN ARBOR: S. Main to Sa-
line, right on U.S. 112 to Sylvan Gar-
dens sign.
Last Day
ROB'T MONTGOMERY
"Trouble For Two
with ROSALIND RUSSELL
Wednesday
TWO FEATURES
PAT O'BRIEN
"I MARRIED A DOCTOR"
and
RICHARD ARLEN
"THREE LIVE GHOSTS"

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Mouthwash identical with the policy of the Na-
tional Association of Manufacturers. Mr. Landon
recognizes that the easiest union in the world
to form is the company union, which all employers
want because it plays right into their hands.
He knows that unless unions actively campaign
for members, and Governor Landon would not al-
low that, they will never get any; and he must
know that without unions on a pretty large scale,
labor will never make any progress, for the benev-
olence of the employers has been tried and found
wanting too often.
Th aas g~oveurnor left out all mention of'

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