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July 09, 1936 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1936-07-09

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THURSDAY, JULY 9, 1936

T HE AMACH1GAN -DA-1 LY

.PAGETHREE

THE~MICHIGAN DAILY

'~. PAGE THREE

Some Women Stars In The Olympic Swimming Finals At A stor iau. Y.

/I

NEWS
of The
DAY

Major Leagues

vew
Detroi
Boston
Washi
Clevels
Chicag
Philad
St. Lo

AMERICAN LEAGUE
W
York ............51
t...........41
............: ...42
ngton ..".........40
and .............39
.o ...............35
elphia ..........2.4
uis ...............23

(From The Associated Press)
Psychiatrist To
Cheek :Paroles
LANSING, July 8.-UP)-Parole
Commissioner Joseph C. Arm-
strong revived the office of state
psychiatrist today, and said the
action .was designed to assure
that there shall be no paroles
for convicts whose mental con-
dition makes them a menace to
society.
He appointed Dr. David P.
Phillips of Menard, Ill.,-to fill the
position at a salary of $6,000 a
year. Dr. Phillips 'will start his
work here .Aug. 1.
Phillips now is superintendent
of the diagnostic division of the
Menard zbranch prison for :Ii-
nois. He formerly served as a
psychiatrist in the United States
Army and as a state criminologist
in Pennsylvania.
The state has been without an
official psychiatrist since 1933,
when it dismissed Dr. A. S. Row-
ley.
Question Suspect
In Castle Murder
CHICAGO, July 8.-(P)-Ed-
ward Lynch, wanted for ques-
tioning in the brick slaying of
Mrs. Florence Thompson Castle,
masarresteditoday by Depart-
ment of Justice agents for re-
turn to Denver, where he is ac-
cused of a $5,163 holdup last.
Sept. 27.
Arraigned before U. S. Com-
missioner Edwin K. Walker, the
prisoner agreed to return to
Denver. After his hearing was
continued until Friday to await
the arrival of a warrant from
Denver, he was turned over to the
State's Attorney's office for in-
terrogation in the killing of Mrs.
Castle, 24- (year-old night club
entertainer, slain in her hotel
room last June 29, while she
slept by the side of her 7-year-
old son Jimmy. The youth viewed
Lynch tonight and declared he
was not the assaliant of his
mother. Detectives decided to
question the man further, how-
ever. They said Lynch denied
the Denver charge and any
knowledge of Mrs. Castle's death.
Wyoming Timberland
Ravaged By Fire
SHERIDAN, Wyo., July 8.-'P)
-High winds sent "crown" fires
racing into the Big Horn Moun-
tains timberland near the Mon-
tana-Wyoming boundary today.
Forest Ranger Y. David said
the blaze jumping from tree top
to tree top was the worst in the
area since 1931. He estimated it
had consumed approximately 3,-
000acres of timber and grass-
lands.
A force of 450 men battled the
firealong its wide front, 75 miles
northwest of Sheridan.
Except for the Big Horn blaze,
the forest fire picture in Mon-
tana and Wyoming was much
more optimistic.
Fire in 'the Newcastle and
Sundanee areas of Wyoming were
believed controlled after winds
died and gave fighters a chance
to "dig in" and hold the flames
to the burned-over regions.
All fires in Montana forests
apparently were out or under
control.
Frank Strong, assistant direct-
or of WPA operations in Wyom-
ing, said he was informed the
Newcastle blaze burned over

about 19,000 acres of land on a
30-mile front. Strong said, bar-
ring resumption of strong winds,
the fire was "licked," although
it may require a week to "mop
"p."
Report Arrest In
Fake Wendel Confession
MT. HOLY, N. Y., J ffi
MT. HOLLY, N. J., July 8.-(AP)
Corporal Vincent Brooks of the
State Police said tonight that
- Ellis Parker, Jr., a fugitive in the
Paul H. Wendel kidnaping case,
had been arrested and released
under $500 bail.
Brooks said the son of the
B urlington county detective
Qhief, Ellis Parker, Sr., had been
given a hearing before Justice
of the Peace Grady at Vincen-
town. The corporal knew no fur-
ther details.

WEDNESDAY RESULT
No games scheduled.
THURSDAY'S GAME
Chicago at Boston.
St. Louis at Philadelphia.
Detroit at Washington.
Cleveland at New York.

L Pct.
23 .689
33 .544
34 .553
35 .533
37 .513
38 .479
48 .333
47 .329
rs
rs
L Pct.
28 .622
27 .614,
33 .554,
32 .543
34 .534
41 .453
46 .370
50 .324

NATIONAL L
St. Louis ............
Chicago ..... ....... .
Pittsburgh ..........
Cincinnati ..........
New York ..........
Boston ..............
Philadelphia......
Brooklyn ............

EAGUE
W.
....46
...43
....41
....38
....39
....34
....27
....24

-Associated Press Photo.
Final Olympic trials in the 'United States women's division at Asto rnia, N Y., July 11 and 12 will bring together many feminine stars who often
have distinguished themselves in ,the water and o'n diving platforms. D orothy Poyntan Hill (left), Los Angeles, is the favorite in the platform
dive, while Katherine Rawls (center, below), Miami Beach, will compete in both the breast stroke and three-meter springboard dive events.
,Claudia Eckert (circle), Chicago, is another low board diving favorite. Eleanor Holm Jarrett (right), New York, appears in a class by herself in
the backstroke. Lenore Kight Wingard (right, below) is considered t he leading entrant in the free style events.

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
Publication in the Bulletin is constructive notice to all members of the
University. Copy received at the office of the Summer Session, Room 1213
Angell Hall until 3:30: 11:00 a.m. on Saturday.

VOL. XLV No. 9
THURSDAY, JULY 9, 1936
Notices
Summer Session Men's Glee Club:
Rehearsal and smoker at Morris Hall
tonight, 7 to 8 p.m. All men in the
University are cordially invited.
David Mattern, Director.
Summer Session French Club: The
next meeting of the Club will take
place tonight at 8 p.m. at "Le Foy-
er Francais," 1414 Washtenaw. Miss
,Gertrude Gilman, president of the
club, will speak on "Voyages en zigzag
en France." There will be songs and
charades. Please bring your mem-
,bership card.
Charles E. Koella.
Attention: Foreign Students: I
wish to urge as many foreign stu-
dents as possible to take advantage
of the trip to Niagara Falls, July 17,
18 and 19, but to emphasize the nec-
essity of their registering in the Sum-
mer Session office not later than
Saturday noon, in order thatrproper
arrangements can be made with the
Immigration authorities.
All such students must, of course,
have with them their passports and,
such extensions of stay as may have
been required in their particular
cases.
J. Raleigh Nelson, Counselor to
Foreign Students.
Students, College of Literature,
Science and the Arts: No course may
be elected for credit after the end of
the second week. Saturday, July 11
is therefore the last date on which
new elections may be approved. The
willingness of an individual instructor
to admit a student later would not
affect the operation of this rule.
School of Education, Changes of
Elections: No course may be elected
for credit after Saturday, July 11; no
course may be dropped without pen-
alty after Saturday, July 25. Any
change of elections of students en-
rolled in this school must be report-
ed at the Registrar's office, Room 4,
University Hall.
Membership in class does not cease
nor begin until all changes have
been thus officially registered. Ar-
rangements made with instructors are
not official changes.
Mail is being held at the Office of
the Summer Session, Room 1213 An-
gell Hall, for a considerable number
of students. Those who are expecting
mail kindly call as soon as possible.
COOLEST
DINING ROOM
ii ANN ARBOR
Delicious Salads
Cold and Vegetable Plates
We Feature a
30c LUNCHEON

Conference on Religion, July 12, 13
and 14:
Prof.gWilhelmnPauck, Chicago
Theological Seminary, will deliver
three lectures-the opening lecture,
Sunday at 8 p.m., at the First Con-
gregational Church upon "Our Cul-
ture and the Outlook for Christian-
ity."
Two lectures upon "Unrealized
Spiritual Resources of the Bible" will
be given by Prof. Leroy Waterman,
one of the translators who produce.d
"An American Translation," (1927),
2 p.m. Monday and Tuesday.
A Symposium by men representing
Medicine, Religion and Psychology
will discuss "Common Problems of
Religion and Mental Hygiene." 3 p.m.
Rareymanuscripts will be exhibited
Monday by Prof. Henry A. Sanders
who will give two lectures upon "The
Epistles of Paul in the Third Cen-
tury," Monday and Tuesday at 11
a.m.
Most of the sessions will be in the
Grand Rapids room at the League.
Open to all members of the Summer
Session.
E. W. Blakeman, Counselor in Re-
ligious Education.
Pi Lambda Theta Tea: Today from
4:30 to 5:30 p.m. at the University
Elementary School Library. Mem-
bers from any chapter are cordially
invited.
Dr. George E. Carrothers will lec-
ture this afternoon at 4:05 in the Uni-
versity High School Auditorium on
"The Committee on - Revision of
Standards for Accrediting Secondary
Schools."
The University of Michigan Public
Health Club willhold a reception for
all the students taking courses in Hy-
STU DENT
SUPPLIES
NOTEBOOKS
Ring or Spiral
PENCILS
INK
NOTEBOOK PAPER
Typewriting Paper
GRAPH PAPER
INDEX CARDS
Fountain Special
FRESH RASPBERRY
SUNDAE
10C

giene and Public Health, and cor-
dially invites them to the get-togeth -
er, to be held Friday, July 10, at 8:30
p.m. at the Women's League Bldg.
German Play: There will be try-
outs held on Friday afternoon at 4
p.m. in th Russian Tea Room of the
Michigan League for parts in a Ger-
man play to be presented this sum-
mer.
German Table: The German Table
will present a musical entertainment!
in the Grand Rapids room of the
Michigan League, Friday, July 10 at
7 p.m. Everyone interested in Ger-
man music and poetry is cordially in-
vited to attend.
Excursion No. 3: A day in Detroit.
Including an automobile tour of
downtown Detroit and Belle Isle, and
visits to the Detroit Institute of Arts,
Detroit Public Library, Fisher Build-
ing, and inspection of Radio Broad-
casting Station WJR, Detroit Zoolo-
gical Gardens. Round trip by special
bus leaving from in front of Angell
Hall Saturday morning, July 11 at 8
a.m. returning to Ann Arbor about
5:30 p.m. Expenses total about $2.
Round trip bus rate $1.50. Bus tick-
ets must be obtained in the Office of
the Summer Session, Room 1213 An-
I gell Hall before 4:30 p.m. Friday, July
10.
Foreign Student Reception and
Tea: All foreign students enrolled in
the Summer Session are invited to
an informal tea to be given by Prof.
J. Raleigh Nelson, Counselor to
Foreign Students, and Mrs. Nelson in
the Grand Rapids Room of the Mich-
igan League next Sunday, July 12
from 4 to 6 p.m. Students enrolled
for the first time are especially {urged;
to avail themselves of this opportuni-

ty to meet other foreign students and
members of the faculty in the inter-
national groups.
J. Raleigh Nelson.
Registration in the Bureau of Ap-
pointments and Occupational Infor-
mation for Seniors and Graduate
Students interested in being consid-
ered for teaching or business place-
ment, will be held through Friday,
July 10, from 10-12 a.m. and 2-4 p.m.
The University Bureau. of Appoint-
ments And Occupational Information
has received announcements of Unit-
ed States Civil Service Examinations
for Chief, Principal, Senior and Topo-
graphic Draftsman, salary, $1,800 to
$2,600; Head Principal and Senior
Photographer, Optional Branches-
General Commercial Photography,
Wet - Plate Photography, Protraiture,
Clinical Photography, Motion Picture
Photography, Aerial or Mosaic, and
Scientific Photography, salary, $2,000
to $2,600; Photographer, Assistant,
Junior and Under Photographer (Wet
Plate or Dry Plate), salary, $1,260 to
$1,800; Principal, Senior, Assistant
and Lithographic Draftsman, salary,
$1,620 to $2,300;' Inspector of Scales
and Weighing and Assistant, Bureau
of Animal Industry, Department of
Agriculture, salary, $2,000 to $2,600.
For further information concerning
these examinations, call at 201 Mason
Hall, office hours, 9 to 12 and 2 to 4
p.m.
Niagara Falls Excursion: Reserva-
tions for the Niagara Falls excursion,
July 17 to 19, which is open to all stu-
dents of the Summer Session and
friends, should be made at the Sum-
mer Session Office. These reserva-
tions should be made preferably by
Tuesday, July 14, in order to assure

potel accommodations, but will be
accepted up to Thursday noon, July
16. A deposit of $8.90 for railroad
fare will be necessary at the time of
the reservation.
Seniors in the School of Music:
The following names comprise the
tentative list of graduates for the
.Bachelor of 'Music in August. If
your name does not appear here,
please call at Room 4, U. Hall before'
Saturday noon, July 11.
Paul Irving Bauer
Robert Henry Black
William Cottrell Boyd
William Ray Champion
Howard Homer Hathaway
James Alfred Salisbury
Seniors in the College of L. S., and
A. The following names comprise the
tentative list of graduates in August.
If your name does appear here, please
call at Room 4, U. Hall before Satur-
day noon, July 11.
William Philip Abbey
Frank Compton Aldrich, Jr.
Alice Abigail Arnold
Vincent John Aug
Albert Gould Baker
Ralph Walder Barnard
Barnard Beaum
Edgar Hugh Behymer, A.B., In-
diana University.
Mary Lou Gray Bishop
Edmund Leon Bochenek
Robert Sherwood Botsford
James Gayle Brien
William Craig Browne
Isadore Irving Burack
William Gordon Burnside
Leo R. Burson

EVENING RADIO
PROGRAMS
6:00-WJR Stevenson Sports.
WWJ Try Tyson.
WXYZ Easy Aces.
GKLW Phil Marley's Music.
6:15---WJR Heroes of Today.
WWJ Dinner Music.
WXYZ Day in Review.
CKLW Sports and News.
6:30-WJR Kate Smith's Band.
WWJ Bulletins.
WXYZ Dance Music.
CXLW Rhythm Ramblings.
6:45-WJR Boake Carter.
WWJ Albert Brothers.
WXYZ Rubinoff-Peerce.
CKLW Turf Topics.
7 :00--WJR Rhythm Review.
WWJ Rudy Vallee's variety Hour
WXYZ Allan Leafus.
CKLW Red Norvo's Music.
7:15-WJR Portland Symphony.
WXYZ- Kyte's Rhythms.
7:30-WXYZ Roy Shields' Music.
CKLW variety Revue.
8:00-WJR Musicale.
wwJ The Showboat.
WXYZ Death valley Days.
CKLW Evening Serenade.
8:15-CKLW Serenade,
8:30-WJR George Welch, Speaker.
Wxyz Ferde Grofe.
CKLW Larry Bradford's Music.
8:45-WXYZ Karl Spaetli.
9:00-WJR George Nash's Band.
WWJ Bing Crosby.
WXYZ Big Broadcast.
CKLW Gems of -Melody.
9:15--CKLW Serenade.
9:30=WJR March of Time.
WXYZ Ferde Grofe.
CKLW Hugo Mariani's*Cosmopolitans.
9:45-WJR Hot Dates in History.
10 :00-WJR Duncan Moore.
WWJ Amos and Andy.
WXYZ Ted Lewis' Music.
CKLW' Scores and News.
10:15WJR Rhythm. -Nw .
. WWJTiger Highlights: Evening
.Melodies.
CKLW Mal Hallett's Music.
10:30-WJR Vincent Lopez' Music.
WXYZ Sammy Diebert's Music.
CKLW Detroit Police Field Day
Program.
10 :45-WWJ Jesse Crowford.
WXYZ Dorniberger's Music.
11 :00-WJR Orville Knapp's Music.
WXYZ Jimmie Jenkins.
WWJ Dance Music.
CKLW Joe Reichman's Music.
11:15-CKLW Mystery Lady.
11:30-WJR Jacques Pray.
WWVJ Dance Music.
WXYZ -Ben Bernie's Music.
CKLW Horace Heidt's Music:
11 :45-WJR Solay and his Violin.
12 :00-WWJ Dance Music.
WXYZ Henry Foster.
CKLW Charlie Agnew's -Music.
12:30-CKLW Joe Sander's Music.
1:00-CKLW Horace Heidt's Music.
Russell Lee Carr
William Richard Clay
Jean Baldwin Craig
Domenic Dascola
Edgar Martin Davidson
Mary Alice Delnay
Ruth Elinor Dorsey
Paul Jones Elliott
Julia Ann Ellis
James Kline Eyre, Jr.
William George Ferris
Kenneth Harris Fillinger
Albert Welker Finlay, Jr.
Louise Marie Florez
Lawrence Shaw Freeman
Eleanor Lorraine Gessner
Robinson McDowell Gilmore
Gertrude Goldsmith
Lewis William Greiner
Theodore Jay Hess
Henry Maurice Houseman

L't

July Specials

CONTINUING OUR
EARLY
SUMMER
SALE
Complete your summer wardrobe at
these attractive prices
CLEARtANCE11
of PASTELS' PRINTS, and DARK SHEERS
Sizes 12 to 42
Including ELLEN KAYE FROCKS
Sizes 11 to 17
11.45°
Formerly to $19.75
INCLUDED IN THIS GROUP:
Values i'2 9.75
WASHflBLE CREPES
a-7
including
MURMURING PINES, CHECKAWAYS
and NOVELTY 'STRIPES

COLORED SH IRTS

formerly $2.50.
formerly $2.00,

... Now $2.00
... Now $1.60

4

WH ITE SHOES
Nunn-Bush & Edgerton
formerly $7.75, now $6.45
formerly $6.00, now $4.95

Q
s J;F

BRADLEY
SWIM TRUNKS
$2.50 .$3.00 - $4:00

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