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July 30, 1936 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1936-07-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, . JULY 36, 1936

THURSDAY, JULY 30, 1936

G. 0. P.Notables
Gather To Hear
Col. Knox Talk
Address Of Acceptance To
Feature Program Of
Party RallyIn Chicago

The LENS
By ROBERT L. GACH

Lash Trains On Shipboard For Olympic Games

CHICAGO, July 29.-(/P)-Repub-
lican leaders from over the nation
began arriving today for the party's
second big campaign ceremony in a
week-the formal notification of Col.
Frank Knox of his nomination for
the vice-presidency of the United
States.
Tomorrow night in Chicago sta-
dium, huge west side auditorium
which has been the setting for many
a memorable event in sports and pol-
itics, the Chicago publisher will ac-
cept officially his post as running
mate to Gov. Alf M. Landon of Kan-
sas, the nominee for president.
Col. Knox in a speech, which will
be broadcast nationally (over the Na-.
tional Broadcasting Co., Columbia
Broadcasting System, Mutual Broad-
casting System and affiliated net-
works), will supplement the discus-
sion of campaign issues initiated last
week by Gov. Landon in his accept-
ance at Topeka.
The vice-presidential candidate
spent the day in conferences with
members of the notification commit-
tee.
Each state and the territories will
have an official representative in the
group which will convey to Col. Knox
the formal word of his selection by
the Cleveland convention for the,
party's second highest honor.
F.D.R. To Interview
Officials In Canada
CAMPOBELLO ISLAND, N. B.,
July 29 .-(Ol)-Mutual development
of hydro-electric power by the United
States and Canada and the proposed
St. Lawrence waterway treaty once
rejected by the Anerican senate were
disclosed 'by President Roosevelt to-
day as two subjects he will discuss
Friday in Quebec with Canadian of-
ficials. '
Sitting on a rock on the Bay of
Fundy shore of Campobello Island,
after a hot dog and cake picnic, the
President also announced in his first
press conference in weeks that he
still felt the $40,000,000 Passama-
quoddy tide harnessing power proj-
ect feasible. He also said he would
confer Saturday with officials of Ver-
mont, New Hampshire and Massachu-
setts on flood prevention.
He laughed off queries as to his
campaign plans and indicated his
tour of the northwest "dust bowl"
would be deferred until late August
or early September rather than mid-
August as originally planned.

Jimmy Savage wants to know why
I recommend developing by inspec-
tion, and how it is done. First of all
I want to explain that with a per-
fectly exposed negative, a good de-
veloper, and the proper methods, de-
velopment by time and temperature
will give very satisfactory results. But
r with the above mentioned conditions,
a good operator can produce still
better results by inspection, and when
conditions are not so good it is often
possible to improve to a great extent,
or even save from complete failure
your poorly exposed films.
I do not recommend at all, the
development of miniature films by
this method, as they should be run
through a fine grain formula, and
these developers are best handled by
time and temperature.
Why Inspection Is Best
As most of you know, it is not pos-
sible to show all of your subject on a I
film, as the difference between the
lightest and darkest parts of the sub-
ject is generally greater than the film
can show, and likewise the printing
paper cannot show everything on the
film for the same reason. So when
taking the picture it is necessary to
expose for the part of the subject de-
sired, unless it is one of those few,
subjects that have a scale short i
enough to show it all. It is also pos-
sible to develop a film so that you can
'help to show the part that you want.
Assuming that sufficient exposure has
been given, if you develop slightly
longer than standard, you will have
better detail in the shadows, or the
other way around, it is possible to
under develop slightly and save the
highlights.'
Cannot Save Negative
This isanot to be misinterpreted as
meaning that prolonged development
will bring out shadow detail when
the exposure has been so light that
no image has been formed in the
shadows. Also it does not mean that
by under development it is possible to
save a badly overexposed negative.
But it does mean that within the
limits of good exposure, and on mod-
ern film these limits are quite broad,
you can greatly improve your films by
developing for the portion desired.
So much for the reasons for de-
velopment by inspection. Tomorrow
I shall try to explain the methods that
give best results when developing in
this way.

EVENING RADIO
PROGRAMS
6:00-WJR Stevenson Sports.
WWJ Ty Tyson.
WXYZ Easy Aces.
CKLW Phil Marley'sdMusic.
6 :15-WJR Heroes of Today.
WWJ Dinner Music.
WXYZ Day in Review.
CKLW Joe Gentile.
6:30-WJR Kate Smith's Band.
WWJ Bulletins: Tiger Talk.
WXYZ Dance Music.
CKLW Rhythm Ramblings.
6:45-WJR Boake Carter.
WWJ Albert Brothers.
WXYZ Rubinoff-Peerce.
CKLW song Recital.
7 :00-WJR Rhythm Review.
WWJ Rudy Vallee's variety Hour.
WXYZ Flute and Nightingale.
CKLW Pancho's Music.
7:15-WJR Portland Symphony.
WXYZ Kyte's Rhythms.
7 :30-WXYZ Roy Shields' Music.
CKLW Variety Revue.
8:OOWJR Mark Warnow's music.
WWJ The Showboat.
WXYZ Death Valley Days.
CKLW Stage Echoes.
8:15-CKLW Serenade.
8:30-wJR Musicale.
WXYZ Great Lakes Symphony Orch.
CKLW Grant Park Concert.
9 :00-WJR Col. Frank Knox Acceptance
Speech.
WWJ Bing Crosby: Dorsey's Music.
a WX YZ Big Broadcast.
CKLW Col. Frank Knox.
9:30-WXYZ Adventure Drama.
10:00-WJR Hot Dates in History.
WWJ Amos and Andy.
WXYZ Speaker.
CKLW Scores and News.
10:15-WJR Duncan Moore.
WWJ Tiger Highlights: Evening
Melodies.
WXYZ BensBernie's Music.
CKLW Horace Heidt's Music.
10:30-WJR Baseball Scores: Musicale.
CKLW Detroit Police Field Day Pro-
gram.
10:45-WWJ Jesse Crawford.
Music.
WJR Lions' Tales; Vincent Lopez'
WXYZ Frank Winegar's Music.
11 :00-WJR Benny Goodman's Music.
WXYZ Shandor: Earl Walton's Music
(11:083.
WWJ Dance Music.
CKLW Harold Stern's Music.
11:1 5-CKLW Mystery Lady.
11 :30-WJRCharles Barnett's Music.
WWJ Dance Music.
wXYZ Eddy Duchin's Music.
CKLW Horace Heidt's Music.
12 :00-WWJ Dance Music.

CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
Placesadvertisements with Classified
Advertising Department. Phone 2-1214.
The classified columns close at five
o'clock previous to day of insertion.
Box numbers may be secured at no
extra charge.
Cash in advancerHcgper reading line
(on basis of five average words to line)
for one-or two insertions. 10c per read-
ing line for three or more insertions.
Minimum three lines per insertion.
Telephone rate - 15c per reading line
for two or more insertions. Minimum
three lines per insertion.
10% discount if paid within ten days
from the date of last insertion.
2 lines daily, college year ...........7Tc
By Contract, per line -2 lines daily.
one month ....................8c
4 lines E.O.D., 2 months............8c
4 lines E.O.D., 2 months ..........8c
100 lines used as desired ..........9c
300 lines used as desired ............8c
1.000 lines used as desired ..........7c
2.000 lines used as desired ........6c
The above rates are per reading line
based on eight reading lines per inch
Ionic type, upper and lower case. Add
6c per line to above rates for all capital
letters. Add 6c per line to above for
bold face, upper and lower case. Add
lOc per line to-above rates for bold face
capital letters.
The above rates are for 7% point type.

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

FOR SALE
SCOTTISH TERRIER PUPS: A.K.C.
6 weeks old, healthy, sturdy, splen-
did breeding. One female, 7 months
old, all reasonably priced to sell.
1313 5 State.
LAUNDRY
LAUNDRY WANTED: Student Co-
ed. Men's shirts 10c. Silks, wools,
our specialty. All bundles done sep--
arately. No markings. Personal sat-
isfaction guaranteed. Call for and
deliver. Phone 5594 any time until
7 o'clock. Silver Laundry, 607 E.
Hoover. 3x
LAUNDRY 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. lx
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Phi Delta Kappa fraternity
pin. Reward for return. William
A. Mann, 621 Forest, Phone 5607.
WANTED
WANTED: Dishwasher, male. Work
in morning only. Phone 2-3746.

h

L MMM9

-Associated Press Photo.
Don Lash (center), Indiana dista'nce star, found a lot of time to
practice aboard ship while crossing the Atlantic ocean with other mem-
bers of the American Olympic team en route to the Olympic games in
Berlin. Here he is with Thomas M. Deckard (left) also of Indiana Uni-
veriity, and Louis Zamperini of California. All are entered in the 5,000
meter run.
Transportation History Traced
In. Wh eels On The Campus'
Dramatization Presented bars. And in the next scene it was
Over WJR By Students obvious that the Diagonal was still
BySholy ground, for young gentlemen of
In Broadcasting that day were called before the dean
________if they were caught rolling across for-
Roller skates and bicycles may bidden territory in their automobiles.
make life dangerous for the modern The fourth scene was the sorority
pedestrian on the campus, but wheels girls' slant on the roller-skating epi-
pedstran n he ampsbutwhelsdemic. And at the end there was a
have been disturbing the University prediction that students and profes-
ever since covered-wagon days. In sors of the future will float down from
a dramatization, "Wheels on the the clouds in autogiros to make their
Campus," broadcasting s t udents8 o'clocks,astillcarefully avoiding the
traced the history of transportation
on the campus yesterday in the bi- The program also included a sketch
weekly program over WJR. on "Michigan Sand Dunes." Three
"Wheels on the Campus" began students discussed plans for a va-
with a scene in the days when the cation in the country of shifting
University consisted of four profes- sands near Traverse City and Muske-
sors and six students. At that time, gon.
long lines of Conestoga wagons pass- A chorus of prayers at St. Cath-
ing the campus raised so much dust erine (who supplies maidens with
that trees would not grow along the husbands) and a short talk advertised
cowpaths between buildings. this week's play at the Lydia Men-
In the second scene, in the days of delssohn Theatre, "The Old Maid,"
striped blazers and gumdrops, the by Zoe Akins.
story was told of a young dude who The half-hour programs are pre-
pedaled his tandem bike down the pared and presented by students of
Diagonal with the dean's daughter broadcasting every Monday and Wed-
hanging breathlessly to the handle- nesday at 1:30 over WJR. Detroit.

L

Starting Today
Francis Lederer
"ONE RAINY
AFTERNOON"
- With
ROLAND HUGH
YOUNG HERBERT
Extra
"Grand Slam Opera"
"Alladin's Lamp"
Paramount News
-- Coming Sunday
It's a Sensation!!!
CLARK GABLE
"SAN FRANCISCO"

I

I

i

. .

II(

III!

Today and Friday
AN UNUSUAL DOUBLE-
FEATURE PROGRAM
PAT O'BRI EN
JOSEPHINE HUTCHINSON
"1 MARRIED
A DOCTOR"
-----and
Richard Arlen
"3 LIVE GHOSTS"
Saturday
Will's Greatest Picture
WILL ROGERS
'CONNECTICUT YANKEE'
with MYRNA LOY

TYPEWRITERS
All Makes Office Machines
and Portables
BOUGHT, SOLD, RENTED,
REPAIRED
0. D. Morrill
314 S. State St.
Since 1908 Phone 6615

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Do.

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KNOW

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your BURNED OUT lamp bulbs for new ones in correct sizes to
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There is a correct size lamp for every purpose, and your Detroit
Edison office will gladly advise you on proper lamp sizes for adequate
lighting. There is no charge for lamp renewal service. The only
requirement is that you present your most recent electric bill for

identification.

This prevents wasteful renewals, protects our cus-

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For greater comfort and convenience, keep your sockets filled with
Mazda lamps of the correct size. The next time you bring in burned
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Note: Lamps are renewed without extra charge only for
residential and commercial customers paying lighting rates
and in the following sizes: 25W, 40W, 60W, 100W,
150W, 200W, 300W, 500W; and three-lite lamp, 100.
200-300W.

11

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