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July 30, 1936 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1936-07-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THURSDAY, JULY 34, 1936

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

THURSDAY, JULY 30, 1936 PAUl THREE

i

NEWS
of The
DAY

(From The Associated Press)
* PA Fights Fresh
Forest Fires In North
NE WBERRY, July 29. -(A')
-All available men on WPA
projects here were called out to-
day to fight fresh forest fires in
the Tahquamenon River district,
which were reported to be burn-
ing fiercely before an 18-mile-
an-hour wind.
The fires, nine miles northeast
of Newberry and about 15 miles
south of Tahquamenon Falls,
were spreading rapidly through
jack pine, spruce and balsam
slashings of the Robert Hunter
Cutting, between Auger and Gim-
let Creeks, tributaires of the Tah-
quamenon.
Timber holdings of the New-
berry Lumber and Chemical
Company were guarded carefully
against new outbreaks of the
fires in the Halifax and Camp
Eight district, which burned over
2,300 acres last week.
Liquor Commission
Fines Breweries
LANSING, July 29.-(A')-The
State Liquor Control Commis-
sion imposed heavy fines on two
breweries today as it pushed its
investigation into reports that
breweries are employing irregular
trade practices.
The- commission fined the
Schlitz Brewing Company, of
Milwaukee, $2,000 on a charge
that it extended abnormal credit
to the Larkin Beverage Company
of Battle Creek. The company
was given, its choice of paying
the fine or having its contract
to sell in Michigan rescinded.
The Zynda Brewing Company,
of Detroit, was fined $500, with
the alternative of having its li-
cense revoked. John S. McDon-
ald, commission c h a i r m a n,
charged that the company had
sold beer to a person distribut-
ing it without a license and had
extended undue credit.
Oil Stove Fire
Causes $1,000 Damage
ISHPEMING, Mich., July 29.-
MP-Fire spreading from an oil
stove explosion today caused
more than $1,000 damage to two
residences here.
The fire started in a shed back
of the house occupied by Mr. and
Mrs. William Housemand. A
strong wind sucked the flames
upward in a space about an inch
wide between the house and shed,
and thy ran along the timbers
into the attic of the home of
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Anderson.
An attempt was made to ex-
tinguish the flames with a gar-
den hose, the delay in calling the
fire department resulting in an
unnecssary loss, and damage to
house furnishings.
Arrests Near In
Grand Rapids Murder
GRAND RAPIDS, July 29.--UP)
- Detective Sergeant Joseph
Sheridan, of the State Police, in-
dicated tonight that arrests were
imminent in connection with the
shooting early yesterday of Po-
lice Chief Fred Bosma, of Zee-
land, by two men suspected of
participation in several western
Michigan robberies.
The sergeant declined to am-
plify his statement.

Ile said officers would question
Allan Decker, 16, of Pontiac, who
rode from Jackson, to Fennville
with Everett Stedman, 20-year-
old Allegan county farm youth
whos story of driving two men
believed to be the fugtives to
Toledo yesterday is under in-
vestigation. Decker said Stedman
told him of the trip and, from
his account, the officersehoped
to check details of Stedman's
statement to them.

Detroit Drops
To Fifth Place
As Yanks Win
Fifteen-Hit Attack Gives
New York Easy Victory
Over Faltering Bengals
DETROIT, July 29. - (/P) - The
New York Yankees blasted the Tigers
out of the first division today, with
Lou Gehrig hitting his 32nd homer
to lead a 15-hit attack for a 13 to 3
victory.
' While Charley Ruffing and Pat
Malone held the Tigers to nine hits,
the former taking credit for the vic-
tory, "murderers' row" landed on Joe
I Sullivan and Elden Auker to score
all their runs in the first five innings
before being stopped by the final two
Detroit hurlers, Chad Kimsey and
Roxie Lawson.
The New Yorkers started their scor-
ing in the opening frame with two
runs coming in when Crosetti walked,
advanced on Di Maggio's single, and
scored on Gehrig's single, to be fol-
lowed across the plate by Di Maggio,
who came in on Bill Dickey's fly.
In the second, five hits produced as
many Yankee runs, with Gehrig's
homer scoring Di Maggio ahead of
him, featuring the rally. In the fifth,
six hits, four of them after two were
out, wound up the New York scoring
with a six-run spree.
Detroit shoved its first run over in
the fifth, on hits by Al Simmons and
Marvin Owen, and Glenn Myatt's
long fly. In the seventh, Kimsey
doubled, Gerald Walker and Irv Burns
singled, and Di Maggio made a wild
throw to third to bring in the other
two Tiger tallies.
Kimsey's appearance on the mound
was his last in Tiger regalia. Although
the Tiger management already had
purchased his ticket to Syracuse,
where he will join the Montreal Roy-
als tomorrow, he was sent in to pitch
the sixth inning.
Cochrane announced that Jake
Wade of Montreal, a Tiger recruit
who has been playing with Montreal
would join the team tomorrow filling
the gap caused by Kimsey's release.
Schoolboy Rowe, who held the Yan-
kees to five hits as the Tigers won
the opening game of the current series
9 to 1, will pitch tomorrow. The vet-
eran Bump Hadley will oppose him.
MoLg
Major Leag ues

Remains At Post
OlymneT eamns
Are Hampered
By Bad Weather
Armerican Squad Crippled'
As Sick List Increases;
Two Boxers Sent Home
BERLIN, July 29.--/P)-The Olym-
pic setting, still pursued by the
weather jinx, was far from peaceful
tonight despite a proposal before the
opening session of the international
Olympic committee that the Nobel
Peace prize be awarded to Baron
Pierre D Couber in. whose sugges-
tion of 40 years ago led to the modern
revivals of the games.
Dtiring another stormy day with
the athletes of 50 nations struggling
to practice in between thunder-show-
ers and elaborate machinery moving
at full speed for the grand opening
- f Saturday, the American contingent
Associated Press Photo. contributed another full share to the
While fighting in Spain's civil disturbing developments.
war was going on nearby, Miss Dor- Two boxers, labelled "Homesick
othy D. Dunham (above) of Cin- cases," were shipped back to the
cinnati, eerk in the American em- United States on the Manhattan; the
bassy, remained working at her Washington crew's brilliant stroke.
desk for two days in the summer oar, Don Hume, joined the rapidly
embassy at San Sebastian. growing sick list and dealt a stunning
blow for the time being to America's
chances of keeping the Olympic
Students Take eight-oared rowing title; and enough
other casualty reports were received
hr u h to make prospects before the actual
firing begins somewhat discouraging.
TgAction Veiled By Secrecy
S Upper R~erions In sharp contrast to the handling
yr lof the Eleanor Holm Jarrett case
which was given a complete airing
from start to finish, Olympic officials
y shipped HowellKing of Detroit, first-
Prof. Rufus In Summer string welterweight boxer, and Joe
SeChurch of Batavia, N. Y., feather-
Session Lecture weight alternate, home without leav-
ing much loop-hole for any come-I
. (Continued from Page 1) back.
Despite some repercussions, mild by
other motions and the world of space comparison with those which fol-I
and time." lowed the previous break in the P
Spectroscopy, the science of com- American team's ranks, Roy Davis ofI
puting source substances and dis- Chicago, manager of the boxing teamr
tances, was discussed at lehgth by stood pat on his statement that "both
Professor Rufus. By slides he dem- boys were shipped home because they
onstrated how the astronomer com- were too homesick to be of any fur- 1
putes with the spectrum. ther value to the team in any ca-I
In conclusion, Professor Rufus pacity, even as sparring partners."
compared the solar system with they London Withdraws Bid
atom, which is relatively identical to A bid on behalf of London for the
the solar system and as great propor- 1940 Olympics was withdrawn to-
tionately in distance as the solar sys- night following opening formalities
tem. of the three-day sessions of the in-P
"Such is our voyage in space and ternational Olympic committee, thust
time. In less than half an hour our leaving the field to Tokyo and Hel-
minds have traveled distances beyond singfors with chances strongly fa-
expression, both great and small, and voring the Japanese capital.
encompassed time immeasurable," he The Japanese appeared worrieds
said. "We have transcended space during the afternoon lobbying, fear-
and time and surpassed the speed of ing a combination of European op-
light in our quest for knowledge, while position to holding the games in theI
our bodies still cling to the spinning far east.
earth as it continues its endless Tokyo, however, already has been@
course around the sun." assured backing by the American andt
Canadian committeemen.r
French House Entertains PROTEST WAGE REDUCTION 9
At Formal Dancing Party LOWELL, July 29.-(P)-A group oft
workers estimated at 75 walked out at
Mr. Charles E. Koella of the French the Lowell Manufacturing Company,E
Department and Mrs. Koella, Miss subsidiary of the Hudson Manufac-E
Georgette Maulbetsch, and Mrs. turing Company, Wednesday, E
Masters were chaperones at a sum-
mer formal Tuesday evening, July 28,
from 8 to- 11 p.m. at Le Foyer Fran-
cais.
of Dorothy Dick, Gertrude Gilman,
and Mary Lou Traywick. Members
of Le Foyer Francais and their guests
danced to radio music, and were
served punch and cookies on the
veranda.
-4

eOA
Have you heard
about the deli
cious Food at the-
R &S RESTAURANT
605 CHURCH STREET Styles that' look more expen-
sive than they are! Slender
straps over the toes ... high
h. . low ... or square heels.
all leather soles. Beautifully
made and among our most
popular styles. Values like
PLAYERS these aren't to be had every
RTORY day.. better buy a pair now!
sent
KINS'
R I Z E PLAY
D MAID"

Spanish Rebels Surrender To Loyalists

State Street, and will return to Ann
Arbor soon after noon. Round trip
bus tickets cost $1.25.
Graduate School: All Graduate
School students who expect to com-
plete their work for a degree at the
close of the present Summer Session
should call at the office of the Grad-
uate School, 1006 Angell Hall, to
check their records and to secure the
proper blank to be used in paying the
diploma fee. The fee should be paid
not later than Saturday, Aug. 1.
C. S. Yoakum, Dean.
Comprehensive Examination in Ed-
ucation: All candidates for the
Teacher's Certificate (except gradu-
ate students who will have received
an advanced degree by August) are
required to pass a Comprehensive
Professional Examination covering
the Education courses prescribed for
the Certificate. The next examina-
tion of this kind w 1 be given in Room
1022, University 'High School, on
Saturday, August 8 at 9 a.m. The
examination will cover Education
A10, C1, special methods, and di-
rected teaching.
to.
to
ks Summer Session Students: Re-
he quests for transcripts of the work of
he this Summer Session in the College
of L.S. & A., and Schools of Arch.,
Educ., and Music should be filed in
Room 4, U. H. on or before Aug. 10.
Requests received after that date
will of necessity be delayed.
WPA WORKER FINED
BRIGHTON, Colo., July 29.-(P)-
Roy Hamblin, 42, WPA worker, ac-
cused of chaining his two sons in the
anck basement of the family home, was
erby sentenced today to 60 days in jail and
erne fined $50 on his plea of guilty to
liffy cruelty to children.

-Associated Press Pho
This picture, rushed from Madrid, Spain, to London and radioed1
New York, shows the surrender of rebel officers in La Montana barracl
after a four-hour battle during which government troops bombed ti
barracks from planes and shelled it with heavy guns, setting part of ti
structure afire.
DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
Publication in the Bulletin is constructive notice to all members of the
University. Copy received at the office of the Summer Session, Room 1213
Angel Hal until 3:30: 11:00 a.m. on Saturday.

VOL. XLV No. 26
THURSDAY, JULY 30, 1936
Notices
Summer Session French Club: The
next meeting of the Club will take
place tonight at 8 p.m. at "Le Foyer
Francais," 1414 Washtenaw. Prof.
Warner F. Patterson of the French
Department will talk on "Louis XIII."
Miss Mary Lou Mitze, Grad., will play
French music. Songs, games, refresh-
ments.
At 5 p.m. today in the Na-
tural . 'Science Auditorium, Prof.
CHayward Keniston, University of
Chicago, will give a lecture entitled
"Modern Poets of Spain and Spanish
America."
"The New Certification Code for
Michigan" is the subject of the lecture
this afternoon at 4:05 p.m. in the
Auditorium of the University High
School. Mr. John R. Emens of the
State Department of Education is the
speaker.
Graduation Recital: Alma Abbott-
Lundgren will play the following pro-
gram in Hill Auditorium, 8:15 p.m.
this evening, in partial fulf ill-
ment of the requirements for the
Master of Music degree, to which the
general public, with the exception of
small children, is cordially invited
to attend.
Pelurdio .................... Corelli
Sonatina "God's Time is Best" .Bach
St. Anne's Fugue ............. Bach

i
,:
i
.
'
I
{.

Chorale in B Minor .........Fra
Carillon ...................Sow
Finale (First Symphony) .... Vi
Sportive Fauns .......... d'Anta

Primavera ..................Bingham
Noel ........................ Mulet
Carillon-Sortie.............Mulet
Northern State Teachers College
picnic at Portage Lake Friday, July
31. Meet at 4:30 p.m. in front of
Angell Hall. Please make reserva-
tions with Dorothy Johnson, phone
8694, between 10 a.m.. and 1 p.m.
Thursday. State whether or not you
will need transportation.
Excursion No. 9: Schools of the
Cranbrook Foundation, Bloomfield
Hills. Reservations for this visit to
the finest group of private schools in
the Middle West must be made be-
fore 4:30 p.m., Friday, July 31, in
Room 1213, Angell Hall. Busses leave
at 8 from in front of Angell Hall,
Eye Glass Frames
Repaired.
Lenses Ground. .
HALLER'S Jewelry
State Street at Liberty

I

Bright Spot

802 PACKARD
DINNER 5 to 8 p.m.
Soup or Tomato Juice
Grilled Tenderloin Steak 55c
Grilled Sirloin Steak 50c
Breaded Pork Chops, Apple Sauce
Virginia Baked Ham, raisin sauce
Roast Veal, Dressing 45c
Swiss Steak 45c
Liver and Onions 40c

50c
50c

Veal Loaf, Mushroom Sauce 40c
Baked Beans, Pork, Brown Bread 35c
vegetable Plate, Egg 35c
Delicatessen Plate, Potato Salad :35c
Mashed or Scalloped Potatoes
Green Beans Havard Beets
vegetable Salad
Pie - Cake - Ice Cream
Fruit - Pudding
Coffee - Tea - Milk
Luncheon Specials 11:15 to 2
Creamed Shrimp on Toast, Vegetable
Dessert,' Beverage 30c
Banana-Nut Salad
P-Nut and Jam Sandwich
Beverage - 25c

AMI
New York
Cleveland
Boston ...
Chicago ..
Detroit ...
Washingtoi
St. Louis
Philadelphi

ERICAN LEAGUE
W. L.
...........64 33
...........56 42
...........53 45
...........50 45
...........50 46
n .........49 48
...........32 63
a ........32 64

Pct.
.660
.571
.541
.526
.521
.505
.337
.333

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
St. Louis 9, Boston 3.
New York 13, Detroit 3.
Chicago 7, Philadelphia 5.
Cleveland 11-6, Washington 6-5.
TODAY'S GAMES
Boston at St. Louis.
New York at Detroit.
Philadelphia at Chicago.
Washington at Cleveland.

NATIONAL LEAGUE

Chicago .
St. Louis ..
New York
Pittsburgh
Cincinnati
Boston ....
Philadelphia
Brooklyn .

W.
. .. ... .. . ..57
...........56
...........52
..........49
..........45
...........45
a .........36
...........35

V. L.
35
38
44
46
46
50
56
60

Pet.
.620'
.596
.542
.516
.495
.474
.391
.368

earance

YESTERDAY'S GAMES
New York 7, Chicago 2.
Pittsburgh 1-10, Boston 4-4.
Brooklyn 22-4, St. Louis 7-5.
Cincinnati-Philadelphia (2 games
postponed, wet grounds).
TODAY'S GAMES
Pittsburgh at Boston.
St. Louis at Brooklyn.
Chicago at New York.
Cincinnati at Philadelphia (2).
DANCING
Class & individual in-
struction in all types
of dancing. Teachers
course. Open daily dur-
ing Suinmer Session.
10 A.M. to 9 P.M.
Phone 9695
Terrace Garden Studio
Wuerth Theatre Bldg.

i

40 1

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:'
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..i f'
>*,
:. :: .x .
i.'r. " '' ' ka : J
..,,,,-;
'4. . ,. y .:
:; , .,
._,; .\.

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t
I

CLEARANCE,

6 Chiffon and Lace
Dinner and Formal
Dresses
$12.95.
7 BETTER COTTON
AND FINE DOTTED
SWISS DRESSES
3 CONGO SUITS
9 BETTER FORMALS
$8.95

Collins'
SUMMER

29 Better Silk
and Sheer Dresses
7 Formals

$10.00

...I
w.
-i

20 COTTON
LINEN - WASH SI'LKS
3 PASTEL COATS
,i KAFFIR SUIT
$6.95

.
y
I

MICHIGAN REPE

12 ORGANDIE
BLOUSES
$1.95

LINEN LADY
BLOUSES
$1.25

ALL
STRAW HATS
including Black,
Brown, Navy
69c

pres
ZOE A

PULITZER

F

"THE OL

White and Pastel Felts and Crepe
1 WASHABLE BUNDURA
3 STRING DRESSES
and 3 STRING COATS
BRADLEY'SI
$8.95,

Hats - Half Price
16 CARRONES
and CHENILLES
BRADLEY'S

$15.00

,:__; :,
ram ....

i

F

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