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June 27, 1932 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1932-06-27

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AILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN I

Interurbans

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Publication in the Bulletin is constructive notice to all members of the
University. Copy received at the otfice of the Dean of the Summer Session
until 3:30, excepting Sundays. 11:30 a. mn. Saturday I
VOLUME X1- MONDAY, JUNE 27, 1932 NUMBER 1
idedy June 29, 5 p. m.
--ents who wish to ') the Un versl.y buld.ngs without taki.n4
3 attjob.le trip may on the party at 3:90 p, . n front ot the Oin-
, ' L-razry. There hs no charge for this e- c rs-on, aut cbles beg
nzhed by citiens of Ann Arbor.
Detailed information concerning the series of eleven Summer Ses-
n excursions may be secured in mimeographed form at the Summer
ssion office. Carlton F. Wells
School of Education Faculty Meeting-There will be a special lunch-
n meeting of the School of Education Faculty Monday noon, June 27th,
the Michigan League. All members are expected to be present.
C .0. Davis, Secretary
English 181, History of American Literature, and English 211(h), Pro-;
ainar YI American IYterat!re u Professor Gregory L. Payne of the Utn-
.i:ty of north Carolna : ill teach these tw;o courses instead of Pro-
sor E. M. Jones.

May Ibe Used
- -- r
Speeng f'oi& o, ..utry homre to
c'ty o e at 90 nn les an hour rim
reaiiined interur'ban cars is a fu-
ture possibility for commuters. That
this commuters' dream can be ac-
complished with a saving of as high
as 65 per cent in power needed, as
compared with old type cars inter-
ests utilities companies still more.
Tests indicating that the principles
of aero-dynamics design make such
results feasible have been complet-
ed recently in the large wind tun-
nel of the University of Michigan
by Felix Pawlowski, Guggenheim
prefessor of aeronautics.
Any automobile, interurban, or
train encounters at typical modern
speeds as much resistance from the
air through vhich it passes as from
the friction of the roada beneath A,
ays :professor a . On a
siriooth surfaced nihwan the wina
resistance factor begins to over-
shadow road friction at 40 miles
an hour. In the case of an interur-
ban car, smooth rails and wheels
reduce the power needed -o care for
"rolling" friction, and from 20 miles
an hour upward an increasingly
high percentage of power goes to
overcome air resistance and suction.
Although the so-called "perfect"
streamlining of vehicles would yield
high power and speed gains, it
would meet several problems at pre-
sent, according to Pawlowski. A
cigar shaped automobile would be
considered "funny," he says, besides
offering parking problems because
of increased length. In the case of
interurban or railway coaches, di-
mensions must conform to rails,
curves, bridges, and tunnels, and
tihe cost of manufacturing radically
new designs would be high.

Summer Session's Forerunners
It is a long step from the first thirds, of the total enrollment is
of the Sunday school Chautauqua made up students who have been in
assemblies in 1R4'to the mmr school during the previous semester
assem:' _s m 1 l tom -nme
+:' _ edi .- -Z . .,,ti l .i. __A
J'th 41s 0.it 1 "~in.s~ ~ ~ th. dcj I t 1
Lake Chautauqua, unmde): tLe d rec u. , :e and sC!e . there e a
ton of Lew,.ts Mdther and shop charde r tha general cal.br of :h
John . :ncent, the modern swrn- I- f r irse Sr:_z .:-
ier sesson raust be traedi, Har:'- u.:i at the esert tze the ou
ard university expeimented, fI.re conpr-ses many of the best knon
years before this time, with sum- men on the campus.

In New Press Building
<Continu-d from Page 1)
back at first, now readly subscribed
to the paper,
Formerly Run For Profit.

C i AJ r'
ADVERTISIN(
ONE SINGLE--And one dou
room both pleasant in quiet ho
near campus. Price reasona
811 Catherine.

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The profits from the paper be- iV PENT-Apartment in S. E
Y 1 1':Laudry. S o f t water
In1~3 heUn~,e~s~y bought the 2O To.s te , sxks darned
n ass ~aon, iin est .bisc the ANZ.D - Iamily and $S.uden
"oar n ontroi of Szudenm ?ubLe land: . Cailed for and deli;ered
cations. Witn the paper tider the Phone 4863.
control of a standing boa'rd, much
progress was made. Savings from
the paper were put into a special
fund. It was from this fund' that SWIM at
the Duplex press was purchased in 1 -
1923. Likewise, the new Press build- Newport Beach
ing was built out of the savings of
the various publications under the Po tage Lake
supervision of the Board in Control
of Student Publications.

1athemnatcs 5O, Introduction to the 'Mathematical Analysis
lcs, II; Mathematics 22'7s, Mathematica Theory of Statistics.
wyswander will give these courses instead of Professor Carver.

of Ztats-
Professor

Members of the Summer Session Faculties: Please notify the attend-
ants in charge of the Engineering Libraries oft any changes in textbooks,
or any reference books which should be placed upon reserve, there, for'
your courses. ' W. W. Denton.
Automobile Regulation: The regulation restricting the use of student
cars :becomes effective at 8:00 a. m., June 27,x 1932. Students who were
regularly enrolled during the preceding school year in this or other in-
stitutions must obtain automobile permits from the Office of the Dean
of Students before using their cars. The' section of the registration card
which was filled out by students wishing to drive cars does, in no way,,
constitute a permit for driving privileges.
Summer Session students who are 28 years of age or over or who
.were engaged in professional pursuits during the preceding academic year
will be considered exempt from an dbservance of the summer ruling. All
students are urged to read carefully the detailed article appearing in this
issue of the "Daily."
Summer Session Seniors: Literary, Music, and Architecture. Those
-who are planning on -completing the work for their degree at the close
of the Summer Session should call at the Registrar's Office, Room 4, Uni-
versity Blall, as soon as possible to have their records checked.
D. L. Riclb.
Mr. Wrobbel of . the NON-GLARE REFLECTOR CO., DETROIT,
MICHIGAN, will be at the Michigan Union, Room 302, on Wednesday,
June 29th, between the hours of 9:30 A. M. and 7:30 P. M., to interview
students who are interested in work 'for this' summer.
J. A. BURSLEY, DEAN OF STUDENTS
Physics: Professor Gregory Breit of New York University will lecture
in the Physics Symposium on the Quantum Theory of Radiation and Dis-
persion. This course will take the place of that announced for Professor
George Gamow of Leningrad who is unable to be in America this year.
H. M. Randall
Political Science I08s (American State Government) will meet in 2215
A.H., Tuesday at 9.
Political Science 135s (Local Rural Government) will meet in 2215
A.H., Tuesday at 11.
Political Science 252s (Government and Politics of Germany) will
meet in 2019 A.H.,'- Tuesday at 10.
Civil Engineering 30s. I will meet the members of this class at 2
o'clock on Monday afternoon in Room 307 of West Engineering Building'
for organization and for choosing a time for the regular class work.
W. C. HIOAD.
Civil Engineering 34s. I will meet the members of this class at 2:30
o'clock on Monday afternoon, in Room 307 of West Engineering Building,,
for preliminary announcements and for choosing a time of meeting for
regular class work. W. C. HOAD.
Visiting Members of Summer Faculty: The Ann Arbor Golf Club of-
fers to visiting members of the faculty a special membership for $15.00
entitling them to the privileges of its golf course, tennis courts, and club
house during the period of their ,stay. in Ann Arbor. Requests for such
nmbhership may he addressed to Professor Jlm B. Waite, Law ehool
Building.
Phi Delta' Kappa: The first regular summer luncheon will. be held
at the Union, Tuesday, June 28, at 12:15. Dean Edmonson will speak.
M. L. Robertson, Pres.
SUMMER PLAYS: The fourth summer season of the Michigan Re-
pertory Players will open Wednesday night, June 29, in the Lydia Men-
delssohn Theatre. The opening play will be A. A. Milne's delightful com-
edy "Mr. Pim Passes By." Announcement of the complete summer pro-
gram is made elsewhere in this paper. Tickets are now available at the
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre from 10 A. M. to 5 P. M. Patrons are urged,
to make reservations early.

mer instruction, 'but the idea made
little headway at first.
But a number of schools and in-
stitutions throughout the country
began to introduce courses of sum-
mer study. At first, they were de-
signed principally for teachers and
for the delinauent students. The
Chautauqua, however, proved such
a success that similarassemblies
were held during the following sum-
m]ers, and the advantages of a more
general course became apparent.
In 1879 a summer school for
teachers in the public schools of the
country vas organized. It proved
an immense succe3.
Not until 1892, however, did the
summer school as it is known today
make its appearance. Dr. W. R.
:Harper, who had for some time been
connected with the administration
of the summer assemblies at Chau-
tauqua, became president of the
University of Chicago and intro-
duced a four-quarter plan. It was
at this time that the summer
school faculties began to be formed
of men who were leaders in their
fields where previously the staffs had
been chiefly comprised of men of
lower acadedmic ranking.
Michigan first adopted the plan
of summer instruction in 1894.
Ninety-one students enrolled for the
course. Since that time there has
been a remarkable increase, both in
size and scope, until in 1931 the
Summer Session at the University
brought more than 4,650 students to
Ann Arbor.
During this time, the Summer
Session has become increasingly the
school of the regular students until
at the present time, almost two-

Campus and City
W i I I Be Visited
On First 'U' Tour
The first University tour is sched-
uled for Thursday -at 2 o'clock when
new students vilk be given an op-
portunity to visit points of interest
about the campus and in Ann Ar-
bor, according to Carlton F. Wells,
secretary of the Summer Session
and directar of Uiversity excurM
SoriS.
Peservaltions must be made before
Wedne.2day in Room 9, University
hail, by those who wish to join the
party, which will leave from the
General library steps at 2:30 o'clock.
There will be no charge for this
excursion. Ann Arbor citizens will
furnish the transportation.
Following an hour's automobile
tour of the city the party will visit
the General library, the William L.
Clements library of Early, American
History, the Michigan Union, and
the new William W. Cook Legal Re-
4earch library.
At the Clements library Dr. Ran-
dolph G. Adams, director of the li-
brary, will explain the character
and functions of this unique reposi-
tory of source material in American
history.
A view of Ann Arbor from the
massive tower of the Union, and a
visit to the picturesque tap-room
cafateria will be of special interest
to students who are spending their
first term at the University.

--SUhlMER

Michigan Repertory Players

PL A Y

SE A SON-

bresent

Seven Great

Plays.

Interurban coaches of moderate
streamlining have already been de-
signed by Professor Pawlowski, how-
ever, and are operating successfully
in several states at increased speeds
and power savings of 30 per cent
Designs recently tested show thai
with coaches lightly but strongly
constructed, and with only front
and rear vestibules streamined, they
are ca pable of 4pe(d, of 70 to 90
miles and powcr savings of 50 pe
cent Conservative applications o1
aero-dynaie principles in this way
gradually moving toward more ex-
treme designs, will be the cours
taken in the future, Professor Paw-
lowski believes.
Alumni University
Attracts 70 for
One Week Sessio-u
Seventy alumni enrolled in the
second annual A 1 u m n i University
held last week, according to Wilfre
Shaw, director of alumni relations
This figure represents a decrease o
22 from last year's enrollment.
"We were very well pleased with
'all 'the courses;!' he. stated. 'They
were all well attended. Everybody
was enthusiastic about them. Geo
graphically, all parts of the countr
were represented, one student regis
tering from Honolulu. There were
also in attendance graduates frog
other institutions."
Ten ,t, were iven lat weel
in tw Pm iiversity proram, as we]
as lesoi:s in golf and tennis. Wed
nesday afternoon, the students at-
tended a lawn party at the home o
P r e s i d e n t Ruthven, and Frida;
night were shown through the Uni
versity observatory by Prof. Hebe
D. Curtis.
A five to six weeks' air tour o
British Columbia along the trans
Canadian air mail route is bein
planned for the summer to encour
age airports building.

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Y

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61

S
S umer ScoolStuden ts!
. .
t
f
The Best Place
e;t
TO Eat
The Michigan
e
y
d
f League
y
f
CAFETERIA MAIN DINING ROOM
30c Luncheon Lunc heons 50c and 75c
~I.5 If~mrIinne, $1 .0
Sunday dinner $1.25
y Sunday supper$1.00
i-.
r
f
- "Excellence in Food and Service"
g

OPENING WEDNESDAY, JUNE 29
A. A. Mil's Delightful Comedy
JUNE 29, 30, JULY 1 AND 2
'Second WGeek : "PAOLA AND FRANCESCA"
'ThirdWeek:- "AT MRS. BEAM'S
Fourth Week: "BERKELEY SQUARE"
Fifth Week: "THE FIELD GOD"
Sixth Week: "ONCE IN A LIFETIME"
Seventh Week: "THE CHALK CIRCLE

11

SEASON TICKETS-7 PLAYS-$4.00 (No tax)

SINGLE ADMISSIONS-75C (No tax)

LYDIA MENDELSSOHN

THEATRE

Box Office Hours: 10 A.M. to 5 P.M.

Phone 6300

Season Tickets are cconOmical, 57c a performance

-MAKE

R ESE

RVATION.S

EARLY

-If

4

U

- I

wish,
"

1
79- o

t ummer Session Saleof

1
J

L r

..a

Loads of Second-hand Books which have been marked to your advantage-
BLANK BOOKS, FOUNTAIN PENS, LABORATORY SUPPLIES, ETC.
- at-

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t

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