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July 13, 1932 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1932-07-13

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Blasts Love Legend

LANSING, July 12.-(AP)-If it's
any comfort to a taxpaying public,
Michigan school teachers next year
will work harder for their money
than at any time within the last few
years.
The ded ction is one of several
made by Webster H. Pearce, state
superintendent of public instruction,
fdllowing a survey of teaching and
pupil load in 182 schools of the state.
Forty-five of the schools are located
in ciites between 5,000 and 25,000
population and 137 in communities
under 5,000.-
A school pupil population that has
increased 3.1 per cent over that of
1930-31 will be taught by a teaching
personnel only 93.1 per cent of that
of last year, 'the survey showed.
Pay Cut 16.3 Per Cent
And although their work willI be
increased the teacher will have to
content Iferself with a smaller sal-
ary. The survey showed that salaries
will be reduced 16.3 per cent under
those of a year ago.
The survey revealed that the num-
ber of teachers in the 182 schools
gill be reduced from 5,256 to 4,895
while the number of pupils will in-
crease from 141,667 to 146,086.
Teachers' salaries will be cut from
$8,406,040 . to $7,040,368 and taxes
from $10,800,691, to $8,840,254. The
average will be $1,438.27 for the year.
City Schools Cut Most
The teacher in the city school
evidently will work harder than her
smhall town sister in the profession.
Statistics on the larger schools
showed that 91.4 per cent of the
personnel of last year will return
for duty in 1932-33 while 95 per
,cent of the small-town teaching
,population will 'be returned. The
school population will increase 2 per
cent in the cities and 4 per cent in
the smaller communities. Salaries
wilsl be cut 17.8 per cent in the big
school and 14.1 per cent in the townsr
under 5,000. Taxes will decline 19.8
per cent in cities between 5,000 and
25,000 population and 1& per cent in
the smaller communities.

Physical Recreation Has
[mportant P lace in Life!
Of Everyone, She Says
"Teachers are supposed to be ex-
amples of' full living, but in their
anxiety to impart this art to their
proteges, they neglect their own
recreational and emotional life-the
integration of the whole is lost," de-
clared Dr. Margaret Bell yesterday
in a lecture on "The Health of the
Teacher." -
"So with a few accurate data be-
fore you, I am trying to encourage
you to take stock, to readjust, to put
some premium on recreation, emo-
tional satisfaction, and I believe one
great device for'letting "off pressure
is through gratifying physical ac-
tivity.
Draft Caused Emphasis.
"There is a great place for physi-
cal recreation in the life of every
woman," said Dr. Bell. "If she is
trained to be -sufficientlS' skillful in
such sports as golf, tennis, swim-
ming, dancing, riding, or outdoor
life, she will not only have the joy
and satisfaction that comes with
performance and be a more accept-
able companion, but she will be more
vigorous, less tense and a better bal-
anced individual.
"The real emphasis on health in,
this country. as in other countries,"
said Dr. Bell, "evolved as a result
of our experience with the war draft
in 1917 when 33' per cent of our
young men were discarded as health
liabilities. As a direct result two
Presidents have convened White
House conferences for child health
and protection.
"In the first consideration of a
health program, the teacher was
considered the 'king pin,' but, as the
program has evolved, the motivation
of teachers in their positive health
has not materialized."
I

HOW THEY
STAND
AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pct.
New York..........55 26 .679
Philadelphia ......48 '36 .571
Detroit.............44 34 .564
Cleveland........... 46 36 .561
Washington........ 44 38 .537
St. Louis........... 39 40 .494
Chicago............28 51 .354
Boston .............18 61 .215
Tuesday's Results
Boston 3, Detroit 2.
New York 4, St. Louis 2.
Cleveland 7, Philadelphia 6.
Washington 13, Chicago 12 (10
innings).
Games Wednesday
St. Louis at New York.
Cleveland at Philadelphia.
Chicago at Washington.
Detroit at Boston.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
.W L Pct.
Pitsburgh ..........44 31 .587
Chicago............43 35 .551
Boston..... ......42 38 .525
St. Louis ...........39 39 .500
Philadelphia ........40 44 .476
Brooklyn...........38 42 .475
New York .. ! ......34 41 .453
Cincinnati.......... 39 49 .443
Tuesday's Results
Pittsburgh 8,. Brooklyn 7 (12f in.)
New York 4, Cincinnati 3.
Chicago 4, Boston 3.
St. Louis , Philadelphia 6.
Games Wednesday
Boston at . Pittsburgih.
Brooklyn at Chicago.
New York at St. Louis.
Philadelphia at Cincinnati.

AssociatedPresPhota
The Rev. E. T. Dahlberg of St.
Paul, defining the differen~e -between
"true love" and infatuation, said
that if Romeo and Juliet had not
died they would have separated and
spoiled history's prize love legend.
Free State Eager
To Arbitrate With
England on Lands

One-third of the educational task
in the United States today is that
of rural education, according to Dr.
Frank Hubbard, associate director of
the research division of the National
Education association, who spoke
yesterday in the University High
School auditourium.
Dr. Hubbard analyzed ten prob-
lems pertaining to rural education,
and discussed solutions for each. 'No
attempt was made to offet a panacea
for conditions, although he did ad-
vance constructive proposals for im-
provement. Problems considered by
'Dr. Hubbard were those dealing with
an efficient unit for school purposes.
financial support of rural. schools,
attendance, and vitalization of cur-
riculum.
STU DENTS
10-DAY SPECIAL!
Three beautiful 8x1 0-size
Portrait-ode in a leathr-
ette frame and painted-
complete offer only $3.50
Also one 8x10 in Ieathr-
ette and painted. This
complete offer,

DUBLIN, July 12.-(AP)-Presi-
dent De Valera told the Daily today
that the Free State goverment is
anxious to arbitrate the land an-
nuities dispute with Great Britain.
If the two governments can reach
an agreement about the personnel
of the board of arbitration, he said,
the Free State will be glad to hand
over the issue to that tribunal as
quickly as possible.
Mr. De Valera heretofore has re-
fused to submit the issue to any con-
sulting body whose members are
drawn exclusively from the, British
Commonwealth. The British gov-
ernment insists arbitration must be
before a Commonwealth jury.

' LASSIFIED and deliver.-1
ADVERTISING FOR SALE
FOR SALE-Most dependable Furs
FOR RENT aid Complte Service. Lowest
_______ENT_ prices in Our 28 years in Ann Ar-
FOR RENT--Furnished apartment bor. Zwerdling's Fur Shop, 215-17
with private 'bath and shower, for E. Liberty, Phone 8507 for Fur
3 or 4 adults. Furnished apart- Storage. -c
ment for 2. Also single room.
Continuous hot water shower, ga- FOR SALE-Cheap, Philco Radio,
rage. Dial , 8544. 422 E. Wash- excellent condition. Call evenings,
ington. -0 21778..-0

The

College

Sh'op

SWIM at
Newport Beach
Portage Lake

Only $2.50
MACK & CO.

________________ 'I

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I E

e

I

Closes for the Mont o August
With a Store-Wide
Every dress, hat, skirt, glove, yes, everything including hosiery, handkerchiefs
and jewelry, will be greatly reduced for clearance before The College Shop
closes for the month's vacation. Nothing will be saved, for when The College
Shopdeopens its doors September first, - in time for the college girl to do
all her fall shopping before the resumption of classes-- every bit of stock
will be fresh and new and fall-inspired.
featuring in three price groups:

Last Times Today
MA JE STIC25c"to2P.., 30c after 2 P. in.,
Evenings 40c
NOW PLA YING! 2:00-3:40-7:00-9:00 P.M.
MARIAN NIXON - RALPU BELLAMY
"REBECCA OF"
SUNNYBROOK FARM"
Extra - Hearst News Comedy
Short Subjects NOW PLAYING
TIE DREAM "IS MY FACE
",HIEi"CAP[Jsv Ricardo Cortez
YS.S. Va iuc helen Twelvetrees
Paramount News
ti".;r ru

DRESSES

$3.98

$7.98

$1098

Values up to $16.75

SWEATERS and BLOUSES

89C

$1.49 $1
All types for all occasions
SKIRTS
$1.49 and $1.98
Pastels, blues and black.

.98

COSTUME JEWELRY
19c and 49c each
PURSES $1.49 and $11.98
Black, browns and tans. Values to
$4.95
SCARF VESTS 69c each
Printed and plain crepes. Were $1.
SCARFS 69c and $1.39
All silk crepe scarfs. Ascot style..

f

.k

Fora
R e a l G
Use th
WIL S(
SUPE
GOLF
Special

olf Game
3 new.
SHOT
BALLS
price ... $1.00 for three

J
HATS $1 and $2.98
Dark and light models.
Brimmed and turban effects.
GLOVES 98c a pair
One lot of kid and fabric gloves.
Up to $1.95. White with colored
trimming,

All colors.

1

11

LtOVES
One lot of

$1.98 a pair
tans, whites, lock

SILK HOSIERY 77c a pair
Mojud full-fashioned silk hosiery n
desired shades.
LINGERIE
*$.69 a $2.49
Slips, teddies, dance sets and gowns
in white, flesh and tea rose.

75c Value
Pejinsylvania I ennis Balls ..... .3 for $100

browns. Values to $3.95.
FISH NET CAPS 69c each
WVhite and colors.

I

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I

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