100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

July 06, 1932 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1932-07-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY P

University Finds
New Methods to
Treat Paralysis
Nearly All Patients Can
Be Saved by Quick Ac-
tion, Hospital Learns
Many Are Immune
Blood Transfusion From
One Who Has Recovered
Increases Resistance
Nine-tenths of the people in cities
have had infantile paralysis and
therefore are immune to it.
This is the conclusion reached by
the contagious staff of the Univer-
sty hospital as the result of re-
search and observation performed
d0irg a recent epidemic in this
section of the state.
Until very recently only correc-
tive treatment was considered possi-
ble, but in the light of new discov-
eries, direct medical aid is now an
established fact. Working on the
theory that the disease is caused by
a specific virus, too small to isolate
by existing methods, the University
hospital staff has developed a course
of treatment which has been a
marked success.
Of more than a hundred cases ad-
mitted to the hospital before paraly-
sis has actually set in, only two pa-
tients were left with any residual
paralysis. All others recovered with-
out ay. lasting physical handicaps.
- The recently developed treatment
depends upon the well-known prin-
ciple of osmosis, the physical phe-
nomenon by which a liquid of less
density passes through a membrane
into a more dense liquid. The par-
ticular effet which is often the di-
retcause of death in this disease is
the flow of fluid into the brain cells.
the ' additional pressue causes
paralysis of various nerve centers
which 'control the heart action and
breathing.
When this pressure appears in a
polio case, glucose is injected into
the patient's veins, greatly increas-
ing the density of the blood stream.'
The fluid in the brain passes by
osmosis into the veins to dilute the
more dense liquid, and the pressure
is greatly decreased.
The procedure, which was devel-
oped for all polio cases in the epi-
demic here last fall, is first to get
the patient to a well-equipped hos-
pital and put him in isolation to
prevent contagion of others. Then
the patient is given either a spinal
injection of serum, or, in the very
successful treatment developed at'
the University hospital, a blood
transfusion.
If possible the transfusion is given
by a person who has recovered from
an acute attack of the disease. The1
more recently the blood donor has1
had the disease, the better the effect
upon the patient. However, since1
nine of every ten city people havei
built up a resistance to the disease,
nearly any person will serve.
The reason for the transfusion is
that the human body builds up a
group of antibodies when attacked
by this disease, just as it does in
small-pox and certain other diseases.
In acute cases when the transfusion
SPECIAL!
Regular Six Dollar
Oil Permanent Wave

$3.00 compcte
Shampoo and Marcel $1.00
Shampoo & Fingerwave 75c
Manicure......... .50c
All Work Guaranteed
Open Evenings
COLLEGE
BEAUTY SHOP
300 South State Street
Phone 2-2813

Rival Candidates Have a Friendly Talk

Gifts Totaling
$100,000 Come
To Unversity
Contributions to Science
And Research Head List
Of 1931 Donations
Gifts amounting to almost $100,-
000 have come to the University in
the course of the last year, it was
recently revealed by Dr. Frank E.
Robbins, assistant to the President.
The total of $99,043.18 does not
include a $10,000 contribution from
Cleveland toward the work done by
Prof. Leroy Waterman in his exca-
vations in Iray, nor does it include
an allowance for the Lake Angelus
observatory, which has been given
with all its equipment to the Uni-
versity.
Contributions toward the expense
of research and other scientific work
formed the major part of the dona-
tions. Under this general division
there is a total of $60,720.32. Money
for research fellowships amounted to
$14,500, and additions to student aid
funds totaled $6,607.86. The student
aid receipts included a donation of
$1,000 made by the 1933 J-Hop com-
mittee.
Gifts ranged from ancient Chinese
musical instruments to several valu-
able collections of books. A trumpet
of "historical interest" was given
for the Stearns collection of musical
instruments by Nicholas Falcone, di-
rector of the Michigan band.
Among the valuable collections of
books was the gift from Dr. Leroy
Crummer of a collection of books
bearing on the history of medicine
and from Mrs. Crummer a collection
of 40 editions of Castiglione's Il
Libro del Cortegiano. Mrs. Alfred
S. Warthinhasg resented to the
Medical library the "Dance of
Death" collection, made by the ]ate
Prof. Alfred S. Warthin. F. -Ray-
mond Evershed, an English barris-
ter, gave to the law library four vol-
umes of "The Records of the Hon-
orable Society of Lincoln's Inn; The
Black Books."

HOW THEY
STAND
NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pct.
Pittsburgh..........38 29 .567
Boston............. 39 34 .534
Chicago............37 34 .525
Phillies............39 38 .506
St. Louis .......... 35 36 .493
Brooklyn ...........35 38 .479
New York .........32 35 .478
Cincinnati ..........35 46 .432
N. York 100 000 110 0- 3 9 0
Pitts. . .100 001 100 1- 4 13 1
Walker and Hogan; Swift and
Grace.
Cincinnati 702 031 001-12 15 1
St. Louis . .002 100 001- 4 10 2
Lucas and Lombardi; Lindsey and
Mancuso.
Only games scheduled.
AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pct.
New York .........50 23 .685
Detroit .............41 29 .586
Philadelphia........43 31 .581
Washington........ 40 34 .541
Cleveland ...........39 34 .534
St. Louis .......... 35 36 .493
Chicago ............26 44 .371
Boston .............14 57 .197
No games scheduled.
EDUCATION
LEAGUE

Ann Arbor Spends
Its Fourth of July
Safely'and Sanely
About a dozen of Ann Arbor's
demi-monde, evidently peeved at the
laws around here which prohibit
noisy firecracker and skyrocket dis-
plays, took to other holiday diver-
sions and as a result are now cool-
ing their heels in Sheriff Andres'
hideaway at the corner of Ashley
and Ann streets.
Not the least of these is Richard
Kovack, 217 S. 5th avenue, who got
his signals crossed, evidently, and
entered an apartment house on S.
4th avenue. One of the three girls
living at this address obtained a
rather good description of him, un-
fortunately, and police picked him up
yesterday in time for Justice Jay H.
Payne's justice court session. He is
to pay $15 and costs or serve the
county for 10 days. Kovak admitted
he was drunk.
Three others, led by Tony Christ-
off, obtained a quantity of moon-
shine and were off to spend the
Fourth in a big way-and at last
reports were trying to cover a bond
of $500. Tony had no intention of
taking the rap, and diligently tried
to get hold of his employers, his at-
torney, or anybody else to get bond,
but he didn't seem to be putting

himself across very effectively.
While he was telephoning, the door
opened and a gentleman entered,
peering about the office.
Richard "Apartment" K o v a ck
spied him.
"What'd they say?" he asked.
"Nothing," was the reply.
Kovack reluctantly heard thei,
three-inch brass key turnint
lock (behind him). The boys mu
have been trying to get that $15
Comparatively speaking, it was a
safe and sane Fourth, though. The
state law forbidding fireworks f±unec-
tioned so well that police declared
they hadn't heard a single report
all day. Only one raid was staged
by county officers and there were no
automobile accidents, fatal or other-
wise.
The lone raid was engineered by
Officers Dailey, Randel and Mattis
who swooped down on the Georg
Staebler establishment, Plymout h
road, Ann Arbor township, and con-
fiscated one gallon of homebrew
beer, two pint bottles of the same
and two and a half pints of moon-
shine whisky. Other equipment for
the manufacture of liquor was de-
stroyed.
SWIM at
Newport Beach
Portage Lake

Associtted Press Photo
Speaker John N. Garner (left) and Charles Curtis were friendly
enough when this picture was taken recently but they will figure prom-
inently in the battle for ballots in November. Mr. Garner is the Dem-
ocratic candidate for; vice president and Mr. Curtis was renominated
for the post by the Republicans.

S

}

: ,

University Joins Price-Cutting
Rush; Offers Falls Tour at $15

W.
Faculty ............. 1
Teachers ............1
Superintendents ..... 0
Principals........... 0

L.
0
0
1
1

Pct.
1.000
1.000
.000
.000

Shorthand, Typewriting and
: n- Y
Related Subjects
Special, part time, intensive courses for Uni-
versity of Michigan Summer Session Students.
Ann Arbor Secretarial School

(Continued from Page- 1)
the party crosses into Canada and
stops' for some time near the ,rink
of the Canadian falls. The next ob-
jective reached after a 'ride along
the brink -of the precipitous gorge
wall is at the railroad bridges over
the Whirlpool rapids.
"Another halt is made at the
is given, the additional blood not
only strengthens the patient, but
actually introduceshantibodies al-
ready developed to combat the-
disease.
The success of this treatment in
all of the 150 cases treated at the
University hospital 'was very satis-
factory, and the characteristic com-
plications were treated separately
as they arose.
The so-called "iron lung" or res-
piratory machine, installed at the
University hospital recently, was
also used in several cases where the
inter-costal muscles and diaphragm
had become paralyzed. The doctors
were able to keep patients breathing
long enough for treatment to take
effect and'.relieve complications of
the disease.
Doctors warn that quick action is
the prime factor in the treatment.
If treatment is given before paralysis
sets in there should be only a small
percentage of deformities and deaths
from the disease, they claim.

Whirlpool and those who wish to
take the aerial railway trip across
the Whirlpool may ao so at this
point. Not far beyond is Niagara
glen, a beautiful wooded park near
which the Canadian falls was cap-
tured by the American under con-
ditions similar to, though reversed
from, those now obtaining at the
cataracet.
'In Canadian Hlcights park, the'
last stop on the Canadian side,.
stands the Brock monument, from
the top of which a fine view of the
basin of earlier Lake Iroquois is ob-
lower end of the Gorge and the
basin of earlier Lake Iroquois is ob-
tained. From Lewiston on the
American side the return route, un-
like the trip down the gorge, fol-
lows the base of the gorge embank-
ment near the river's edge. A stop
is made opposite the Whirlpool
rapids, the most spectacular view
perhaps in the entire district."
Saturday night the party will ob-
serve the night illumination of the
falls, a spectacular play of varicol-
ored searchlights upon both the
American and Canadian falls.
Approximately 50 students will
leave the campus at 12:45 o'clock
today for Detroit to participate in
the third University tour which will
include a visit to points of interest
at the Ford Motor company, River
Rouge.

Yesterday's Results
Faculty 10, Principals 5.
Teachers 14, Superintendents 9.
Tomorrow's Games
Faculty vs. Superintendents.
Principals vs. Teachers.

205 S. State St.

Phone 3330

CHIC
BEAUTY SHOPPE
Shampoo
and Finger Wave
50c
Permanents . $3 and Up
Oil Shampoo and
Finger Wave . . . . 75c
Shampoo and Marcel $1.00

i1

Michigan Repertory Players
Present
Stephen Phillip's Delightful Romance
"PAOLO AND FRANCESCA"
~'OPENING TONIGHT'
WEDNESDAY THROUGH SATURDAY
SPECIAL MATINEE: FRIDAY AFTERNOON AT 3:1S5
All Seats 50c
SEASON TICKETS AT $3.50 for the Remaining Six Plays
Single Admissions 75c For Reservations, Phone 6300
C'<){-(> C-t-t<--)>{< O <)--C} -()>0<)- f)---- <--'-) > p 4<= > f>

Marcel . . . . . . .
Manicure . . . . . .
Phone 2-2757

. 75c
. 75c

205 Michigan Theater Bldg.

MAJESTIC

25c Until 2 P.M.
30c after 2; Nights 40c

Starting Today!
JOAN BLONDELL in
"The Famous Ferguson Case"
Extra-Edgar Kennedy Comedy-Hearst News
ti~i.: " -. r '.
CONSTANCE BENNETT
kTom LowellNell
Tomorrow Sherman Hamilton
"THUNDER r ® n
-.. "WHAT PRICE
Tallulah BakheadHOLLYWD
Charles 'Paul-Chailey Chase Comedy
Bickford Lukas PARAMOUNT NEWS
MICHIGAN
if 4'

J ACOBSON'S

After-The-Fourth

clerace

Beg ins Today

DRESES

With Drastic Reduction on Each Individual Garment !

BETTER VALUE DRESSES

All late spring and summer models and materials ...
Tub Silks, White and Pastels, Sheers, Prints, both
light and dark . . . a wonderful assortment of plain
colors. Eaeh dress is a bargain in itself.

SPORT DRESSES
We have a few white and pastel flannel sport dresses
$5.00 2 for $7.00
COTTON DRESSES
In dotted Swiss and voiles, eyelets, one- and two-piece
linens; piques, all desired colors. For hot weather.
$5.95 2 for$11.00

i
'
;:
',.
Iii
I

L.

Names

Addresses -

I

-of all
Sudens
may be found,
in only one

$1.95

1 '"

100 Printed Voile Dresses in pastel shades. All sizes

One
cool

group
days.

KNITTED DRESSES
of knitted one- and two-piece dresses for
Values to $12.75.
$4.95

$6.95

$5.95

$4.95

Phone Numbers-
Home Towns-

place

-A'

COATS

An opportunity to buy a coat at a fraction of its former value. Coats Less Than
for travel, town and country. Our entire stock will go at.. . . . Half Price

F

Group of Silk Coats, $12.75 Values, for only. . . . . . . . * . . . . . . . . $7.95

THE SUMMER STUDENT DIRECTORY

25 dozen Wayne
All sizes. $1.95

HOSE
Knit Hose . . . all summer shades.
values

Brassiere
cluded in

BATHING SUITS
Tops, sun backs, all shades and- sizes} in-
this group.

. /1

II

79c
SLIPS

. $2.95
WOOI SIIIr

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan