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August 04, 1932 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1932-08-04

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!, 1932 THFV MICHITGAN DATLI

Intramural
Lundberg Wins'
Handball Title;
Beats Anderson,
eventy Enter in Tennis
Singles Tournament This
Summer
Golf Is Popular
Swimming Program Draws
To Close; Employ Point'
System

Sports

Reach

Finals

as

Blast Rocks Park Avenue Hotel, 5 Are Killed

Summer
Lamont Resigns Post;
Chapin Is Appointed
WASHINGTON, Aug. 3. - (A')
Shifting his cabinet line-up for the
fourth time in four years, President
Hoover today accepted the resigna-
tion of Robert Patterson Lamont
as secretary of commerce and im-
mediately named R o y Dikeman
Chapin; of Detroit, to fill the post.
Lamont's resignation was handed
in, the President said, because of the
necessity of his immediately re-en-
tering private business. The Chicago
engineer-financier was absent from
the capital today.

Federal Government Gets Only
30 Cents of Taxpayer's Dollar

CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING

With the Summer Session now
drawing to a close the various sport
events which have been sponsored by
the Intramural department have
progressed to the finals in certain
competitions while in others cham-
pionships have been declared.
The final game in handball was
played between Lundberg and Ander-
son with Lieidberg winning the
championship 21-5 and 21-2. In the
semi-finals Lundberg defeated Phelps
who was the all-campus champion
last year.
In horseshoes Nisen is to meet
Hiuser in the finals to fight it out
for the championship. In the semi-
finals Nisen defeated Redniss while"
Hiuser defeated Sahlen. Redniss was
runner-up in last year's horseshoe
tournament during the Summer Ses-
sion.
Colean i Finals
The tennis singles with 70 entries,
the largest number to participate in
any tournament run by the Intra-
mural department this summer, has
progressed rapidly. In the upper
bracket, Coleman has reached the
finals and is now waiting for the
lower bracket to be completed. In
the lower bracket Lewsi and Nisen
are pitted against each other in the
semi-finals with Lewis favored to win
the match. Tennis double matches
are also progressing and have reached
the quarter-finals.
Golf, another sport with a large
number of entries, has reached the
quarter-finals with the following men
still in the r unning:
Brauer has alreadys won his quar-
ter match from Redniss, last sm-
mer's champion, Patterson plays Kal-
lenbach, Hrdy plays Willson, and
O'Bryon plays Adel in the other
quarter-final matches. These
matches must be played this week
so that the semi-finals and finals
can be played next week, according
to officials at the Intramural build-
Fraternity Active
In the tap dancing class training
and instruction has been carried .on
during the stier session with a
large number in attendance. Sigma
Delta. Psi, the nation'al honorary ath-
letic fraternity, has also been active
throughout the Sumner Session with
)many of the' candidates attaining
success in the various athletic events.
The summer Intramiural swimming
program is nearing conipletion with
only three more events t' be ruh
the 150-yard niedley race, and the
200-yard free style and diving com-
petition. Individual pdints'are given
to each man accordin'to the place
he finishes. "The four highest rank-
ing men in the nine vents run so far
are: Lou Diamond with 840 points,
R. P. McLeish with 620, B. R. Walling
with 120, and J. W. Wehauser with
120.
RIDE@t
SADDL9 STabLES
tPt'NE 718
Newprt Beach
Portage Lake

#I

"An explosion shook the 42-story Ritz Towers hotel on New York's fashionable Park avenue, killing five
firemen and-injuring more than 26 persons. The explosion occurred in a paint shop below the street while
firemen were fighting a basement fire. The blast smashed the front of a je'welry shop and more than $100,-

000 in gems were scattered in the street.

(Associated Press Photo)

Guy Filkins,
Organist, Will
Give Program
Students May Hear Well-
Known Musician Here
Tomorrow Afternoon
Guy Filkins, distinguished Detroit
organist who has been a student
under Palmer Christian for some
time, will give a graduation recital
at 4:15 o'clock tomorrow afternoon
in Hill auditorium. He has won wide
recognition as a church organist,
radio performer, and concert artist.
For a number of years Mr. Filkins
has been director of music'"at the
Central Methodist church, and has
done much teaching in Detroit. The
program he will provide is ds follows:
Choral Prelude, "Helft mir Gottes
Gute Preisen".........I... . Bach
Aid in D . .....................Bach
Toccata and Fugue in D minor. Bach
Cantabile (Sonata VII).....Guilmant
Scherzo (Symphony IV)......Widor
Piece Heroique ............ Franck
Up the Sagueney ........... Russell
To the Rising Sun ........ Torjussen
Rhapsody Catalane ........ Bonnet
First Air Mail Trrier
Wi1 Take to Air Again
NEW BRITAIN, Conn., Aug. 3.-(1P)
-The first airplane to carry mail
will rise again aft6r having been
grounded for years.
The craft, flown by the late Charles
K. Hamilton on the first. non-stop
flight from New York to Philadelphia
June 13, 1910, is being rebuilt by
John H. Hadigan, New Britain pilot.
S"pecial too
GOOD FOR ONE WEEK
Three 8x1O sie Po a one
in a H andsomc Lealitretle
Frame, for only
$2.50
Tliese arc of ti ei ct quality
mnoney can buy.
also
Students' Application Photos
3for$1-or12for$d
Macl & Coe
4161 Annex

Minnesota Economist Proposes
Definite Rent in Farm Products
ST. PAUL, Aug. 3.-R)-A new lord should receive exactly these
"compromise" type of farm lease, amounts of grain as rent.
combining advantages of share leas- "Such an agreement would give
ing and cash renting, is proposed by the capable tenant the same incen-
William L. Cavert, agricultural eco- ould cashrmaximu nd oid reieveas
nomist at the University of Mimneso- the landlord of the necessity of look-
tf. ing after division of the crop. The
He suggests a lease in which the tenant would take the weather risk,
tenant ag'ees to deliver a specified while the landlord would take the
number of bushels of certain grains price risk."
-instead of splitting 50-50 with the
owner of paying a cash rent. Florida City Tries
Such a lease, he believes, would
provide added incentive for .the ten- 'Stree LlightSaving
ant.
"A tenant and a landlord," Cav- Time to Cut Costs
ert explains, "might agree-that their
particular farm would average a to- LAKE WORTH, Fla.-R)-Some-
tal production of about 2,400 bushels body here thought there should be
of corn1,800 bushels of oats and a "street light saving time," and
900 bushels of barley for a period of there'll be a lot of moon watching
years. as a result.
"Under a share rental system Under a, new order issued by City
where the landlord gets one-third, Superintendent George W. Fisher,
he would receive 800 bushels of corn, Lake Worth street lights will be,
600 of oats and 300 of barley at the turned on each evening at dusk to
local elevator. burn until 11:30 P. M. If the .mbon
"It might therefore be agreed, is shining brightly, the lights will
under the new plan, that the land- go off half an hour before midnight.

TYPEWRITERS, all makes, bought,
sold, rented, exchanged, repaired.
O. D. MORRILL, 314 Sot State.
-c
TYPEWRITING AND M I M E O-
GRAPHING promptly and neatly
done. O. D. MORRILL, 314 So.
State St. -c
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Not if your furs are stored
here. Our policy protects your furs
completely 12 months. Zwerdling's
Fur Shop. Complete fur service
since 1904. -e
WANTED
WASHING AND IRONING WANT-
ED-Will call for and deliver.
Soft water used; washing done
separate. Phone 2-3478. -c
WAITED--Laundry. So f t water.
21044. Towels free, socks darned.
-c
WOMAN driving to Laramie, Wyom-
ing after Summer School wishes
passenger. Call 22203. -1
WANTED-Half - time. or 'full - time
business position. Young woman
with business and Univ. training,
thorough experience in academic
routine. -1
TYPING--Theses a specialty. Call
M. V. Hartsuff, 9087.- -0
FOR RENT
FOR RENT--Furnished 'apartment
with private bath and shower for
3 or 4 adults. Also furnished
apartment for 1 or 2, and single
room. Shower, continuous hot
water, garage. Dial 8544. 422 E.
Washington. -0
FOR RENT--Well located 4 room
apartment. Frigidair, steam heat,
furnished, 4 adults one child.
Phone 3408.--

.L

Ring out the old-
Ring in the new
Suddenly the industrial leader awakes to take stock of
his plant. He finds that, under his very nose, it has-grown
antiquated. New'days-new ways. Each new machine
rings the death knell of old ones now in use. And the
steady stream of new and better tools often takes indus-
try by surprise.
American Machinist has taken it upon itself to stave off
this day of reckoning in our metal-working plants. It has
appointed itself an advance guard of modern industry...
scouting for the new.;. bringing word of it to the lead.
ers of industry .. pointing out to them the wrinkles and
signs of age on our industrial brow.
It doesn't wait for them to take stock, of themselves.
Every five years American Machinist takes stock for them.
And it brings them the cold facts through an exhaustive
and rigid nation-wide survey. In 1925, it pointed out
that 44% of all machine-tool equipment was obsolete. In
1930, its census set that figure at 48%. It placed that
data before responsible men. And it showed them how
to bring their plants up to date.
There is probably a McGraw-Hill paper covering the in-
dustry you intend to enter. Get the jump on your first job
by keeping abreast of what its leaders are thinking and

/

4
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r < t ,
_ .. °;
\ '""
-
.,
.. , . '°
4$
\ M MA

B~usiness men, industrialists and engi-
neers-600,000 of them-regularly read
the McGraw-hill Publications. More
than 3,000,000 use McGraw-Hill books
and magazines in their business.
The Business Week Radio Retailing
'Systemi ' ' Electronics
Aviation Product Engineering
} Factory and.Tndustrial Engineering and
Management Mining Journal
Power Engineering and
Maintenance Mining World
Engineering Metal and
Mineral Markets

Sponsoring the new wind blown brim which
is kind to the face. . . in the most o ut-

standzng fall shades . . . flack, Beetroot,
and Ainamese (a lovely warm broiyn) . .

I

Coal Age Electric Railway Journal
Textile World Bus Transportation
Food Industries American Machinist
Electrical'World Engineering News.

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