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August 02, 1932 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1932-08-02

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MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY,, AUG. 2

THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY, AUG.
_________________________________________________________________________________________________ I ~ - _______________________________

Japanese Kill
Gen, M} , Wipe
Out His Troops
Force of 20,000 Route!
Near Hailu; Entire Staff
Trapped by Invaders
HARBIN, Manchuria, Aug. 1.--/P)
-Gen. Ma Char-Shan, unlettered
battler who was twice leader of the
northern Manchurian armies against
Japan, is dead, kris body riddled by
Japanese bullets.
He died with his boots on, they
said, this former bandit whose name
blazed briefly across the first pages
a of newspapers of the world last fall,
when the Japanese invasion of Man-
churia began.
His body was found Wednesday in
a mud hut in the squalid little village
of Ankuthen, 40 miles northeast of
Hailu. His staff officers were piled
in pools of blood around him, his
army, which once numbered 20,000
men, wiped out.
Fought to Last
Trapped between two Japanese di'-
visions which had pursued him since
the day he left the cabinet of Henry
Pu-Yi at Changchun andy went back
to the north to renew his fight against
the invaders, he and his army fought
gallantly to the last.
They stood with their backs against
a mountain side, retreat cut off, and
the Japanese pressed in until they
had annihilated the last man.
Several times during the four
months he was hunted Gen. Ma was
reported killed or captured. But he
always escaped. Sometimes he even
resorted to the movie practice of
using several "doubles" to hide his
real whereabouts.
Sure of Victory
But Geri. Matsuki the Japan,ese
commander, was certain this time.
He announced he was bringing the
body back here.
Gen. Shigeru ;H o n j o, Japanese
commander - in - chief, whose army
Gen. Ma fought in the Nonni bridge
and Tsitsihar campaign, pr ised his
opponent's courage today a said he
regretted Ma was "led into fighting
for the wrong cause."
After the Pu-Yi regime was set up
at Changchun Ma became minister
of war. Later he disappeared and
returned to fighting in the north.
He explained his compromise . with
the Japanese was only a ruse to learn
the secrets of the new government.
Faris' Human Nature
Class to Hol4 Picnic
The class of Prof. Ellsworth Faris
in the study of human ,nautre will
hold a picnic this afternoon at the
Firep ace. The party will meet at 5
o'clock at the Women's' League build-
ing. 'Tventy-five or 30 students will
attend the affair.
Leonard Bestrom, superintendeit
of schools at Baroda, Mich., is chair-
"nan of the committee in charge.

E

Mechanic Prince Greets Brother in Detroit

(Associated Press Photo)
, The former Prince Frederick of Prussia (left), son of the former
crown prince of Germany, who is now working in an automobile factory
in Detroit, met his bromner, Louis Ferdinand, when the latter arrived
from Germany. He had driven to New York from Detroit in 14 hours,
Universit to Continue Radio
Programs Over WJR Next Year

Chief Fore ter
Of U. S. Visits
Michigan Camp
Major Stuart Discusses
Forestry Program with
Professor Craig
CAMP FILIBERT ROTH, Aug. 1.
--(Special)' Major R. Y. Stuart, chief
forester of the United States For-
est service, has returned to his Wash-
ington office after visiting the Uni-
versity camp near Munising.
Mr. Stuart conferred with Prof.
Robert Craig, Jr., director, and made
numerous inquiries about the pro-
gram and the equipment of the camp.
He was accompanied by regional for-
ester E. W. Tinker of Milwaukee and
by forest supervisor Leslie Bean, who
is in charge of the Upper Peninsula
national forests.
A recent trip to the Upper Penin-
sula branch of the Michigan State
Agricultural Experimentation sta-

tion at the invitation of G. W. Put-
nam, director, gave the forestry stu-
dents a chance to view the plant
breeding plots and to note certain
cultural practices which have appli-
cation in forestry ;nursery work.
A storm of 2.35 inches rainfall
here furnished ideal conditions for
disposing of dangeruos slashings
from old nearby logging operations.,
Quick to take advantage of this the
foresters have had a day's experience
in slash disposal through burning as
a means of reducing fire hazarg. I
Special forestry torches and other
modern equipment were tried out in
the work.

BAY CITY PILOT CRASHES
BAY' CITY, Aug. 1.-(P)-A test
flight, one of many he had in his
years of flying, has ended the career
of William Schwab, 43, veteran Bay
City pilpt.

4 Swim at
Newport Beach
sPortae Lake

3
.

:4

Selected speeches from the Uni-
versity of Michigan and WJR, De-
troit, radio programs have been
printed by the University. These are
in addition to the copies of the
speeches, printed in leaflets, and dis-
tributed to listeners throughout the
country.
Forty thousand of the leaflets were
published during the year, but the
supply has now been completely ex-
hausted.
Plans were also announced in the
new booklet for' the continuation of
Scientist changes
Way Small Insects
Bear Their Young
Prof. A. Franklin Shull, university
of Michigan zoologist who several
years ago succeeded in controlling
the wing growth of certani insects,
now can control the way they may
bear their young.
In experiments with aphides, known
as plant lice or ant ccaws, Professor
Shull pre-determined whether the
aphides should be pviparous, that is,
producing their young from eggs, or
viviparous, producing their young
alive.
Either kind could be converted
into the other by treating the par-
ents with different conditions of light
and temperature.

the radio programs through the com-
ing year. One hundred twenty-three
programs are being planned and will
include broadcasts of the Parent-
Teacher series at 5 o'clock Sunday
afternoons, the continuation of the
Michigan University of the Air at 2
o'clock on Monday, Tuesday,
Wednesday, and Thursday each
week, and the Saturday evening pro-
grams with a series of related talks.
The hour for the Saturday night
broadcasts has not yet been an-
nounced.
The broadcasts will again be under
the direction of Prof. Waldo Abbot,
of the English department. They
were first arranged by Leo Fitzpat-
rick and John Eccles of the WJR
station in Detroit
Series are already being arranged
for the next year and will include
talks on national, city and state tax-
ation problems, and historical dis-
cussions ofnpresidents and presiden-
tial elections.

mU

I

MICHIGAN REPERTORY PLAYERS
present

"cOnce in a Ljfetine"

1

1..- ____ -_ _. -- - i

I

BRIGHT SPOT
802 PackardStreet
TODAY 11:30 to 1.30
Spaghetti and Meat Balls
Vegetable Salad
Banaua-Nut Salad with Minced Ham
Sandwich
Hot Meat Loaf Sandwich
Mushroom Gravy
Roast Beef and Roast Pork
Potatoes, Salad and Spinach
Ice Cream -- Cake
Fresh Peach whlip
Coffee -- Milk
30c
5:30 to 7:301
Soup
Individual Chicken Pies
Breaded Veal Cutlets
Roast Beef
Lamb Chop griled with Sausage
Bacon and Tomato
Sjiaffed Pork Chops
Mashed or Au Gratin Potatoes
Lima Beans - Scalloped Tomatoes
Vegetable Salad
Lennon Pie Ice Cream Cake
Coffee Milk Tea

f
"Chocolate Soda,
Please"
Certainly, and a .mighty deli-
cious one it will be. too. A
good service of rich creamy
chocolate, two scoops of ice
cream (any flavor), cold car-
bonated water, and topped
with fresh whipped cream.
15c
Calkins-Fletcher
Drug Company
Soda Fountains

GEORGE S. KAUFMAN'S LAUGH HIT
Once mi n Lifetime" is the finest spontaneous knockout
of the season'"-Robert Garland in the New York Telegram
All OPENING WEDNESDAY
5eats
75c Phone 6300
LYDIA MENDELSSOHNTHEATRF
HEAT'-

A

F

I &

I

A Final Effort at.. .

STOCK CLEARANCE
athe, Most Sensational Reucios
All this week. and next, We will offer a quality bookstore stock
at the most drastic reductions ever given in Ann Arbor.

I/3

L

rm

this week's dinner specials

11

Fiction as low as 19c per volume or 3 volumes for 50c
The popular $1.00 series of fiction reduced to. . . . 73c
1Non-fiction at One Half Off.
All reference books 15c and 25c, formerly priced $2 & $3
A large table of new fall Juvenile Books at One-Third Off.
Leather Goods and Felts at one-half off.
These and many other features in books deserve your inspection of these bargains at prices which
will never be duplicated.
The Famous Black and Gold Library and a beautfiul stock ofi
FINE BINDINGS-Unusual Volumes with permanent value-
ONE-THI RD OFF
Those famous "Michigan Purps" formerly selling at 1.25
now offered for 29c. A real Michigan souvenir.
These next two weeks will see many hundreds of the most sensational bargains
Slater's Two Campus Bookstores

., 0 *50c
* Q*, 50c

tke
den

I

U;

.

a

]III

East University Avenue

State Street

-

MICHIGAN

UNION,

CAFETERIA

I 1 N 1 ', I A"

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