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July 29, 1932 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1932-07-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

4ty Concerts, Student Recitals Announced for Session

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CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING

4> .

Elinor Wortley
Plans Graduate
Recital Monday
Suminr Students Invited
To Attend Musicale in
Oill Auditorium
Talented Musician
Chamber Music Class to
Make Appearance Hera
On August 4
Miss Elinor Wortley, advanced
organ student under Prof. Palmer
Christian,' will give a graduation re-
cital at' 4:15 o'clockaMonday in Hill
auditorium. Summer Session stu-
dents and townspeople are invited
to attend.
Miss Wortley, whose home is in
Windsor, Ont., was graduated from
the University with the degree of
Bachelor of Arts in 1931 after mak-
ing a very creditable record. She is
b member of Pi Beta Phi sorority
and before coming to Ann Arbor had
studied music at McGill university
and in Detroit. She possesses a bril-
liant style, excellent musicianship
and a fine technic, according to
music school facul-ty members.
Outstanding Numbers
The program which she will play
on this occasion includes two out-
standing, pieces of organ literature,
the Bach, Passacaglia and Fugue,
and the Franck, B minor Chorale.
The program in full is as follows:
Menuett et Gigue en Rondeau,
Rameau
Passacaglia and Fugue in C minor,
Bach
Adagio (Symphony VI).... ..Widor
Allegro (Symphony IV) .......Vierne
Choral in B minor........... Franck
Prelude.:.................Schmitt
Concert Variations .. ,.. ...Bonnat
Complete Series
Other concerts to take place dur-
ing the Summer Session are as fol-
lows:
Regular faculty concert by Joseph
Brinkman, pianist, and P a m e r
Christian, organist, at 8:15 o'clock
Tuesday night, Aug. 2. The program
will consist of American music.
Student recitals will be given by
the chamber of music class at 8:15
o'clock Aug. 4 under the direction of
Pi of. Hanns Pick, and at 4:15 o'clok
Aug. 5 Guy Filkins, organist, will be
heard in a graduation recital. John
Fuess, organist, will give his gradua-
tion recital at 4:15 o'clock Aug. 8,
and Frank Collins, Jr., will offer his
organ recital at 4:15 o'clock Aug. 11.
Circus Plans Program~
For Crippled Children
Crippled children at the University
hospital will be entertained by per-
formers and clowns from the Hagen-
beck-Wallace circus next Tuesday
when the big show arives in the city
for two performances.
: Transportation to the hospital for
the performers will be furnished by
members of the Ann Arbor Kiwanis
club. Alton P. W. Hewett, chairman
of the Kiwanis child welfare commit-
tee, said yesterday that the circus
had gladly agreed to entertain the
confined children.
SWIM at
Newport Beach
Portage Lake

THE CRIMSON-STAIN
MYSTERY
0
Black and bloody tales of weird brutality
emerged from the Campus Laundry. Shirt
fronts and collars were continually found
spa ttered wi th gobsof gore. Police bclievel
that the undergradls were careless with
their raspberry jam. imagine their con-
s"ernation.iwh}en it eveloped that stu-
dents dislike raspberry! Then suddenly,
the stains ceased. Swank had come to
owr"Swa'k lookerlik " a pin, ut isn't.
'Vet it keeps your collar trimly in place,
Swank has no poinots-and that's its big
point. You don't. transfix your collar, and
punch it full of ,oles. You don't stab your
neck and thumb, and make theselook:as
though you had caressed a cactus. No
putncture'. ?ains, or pink stains. Jewelers'
or men's shops. Plain, fancy and sport
designs in various lengths. Gold-filled or
solid gold. 50 cents to $10.

hI Midst of B ttle Police $top Ex-Soldier Picketers

aemies of Hitler Organize
To End Nazi's Rush to Power

BERLIN, Germany, July 28.-(AP)
-Antifascists of Germany, led chief-
ly by Philip Schneidermann, veteran
socialist campaigner, and Karl Hoel-
termann, head of the republican
reichsbanner, are waging a bitter war
against Hitlerism in the closing days
of the campaign leading up to the
July 31 reichstag election.
Planes, trucks, motorcycles and
radio are the modern devices used to
disseminate anti-Hitler propaganda
to the remotest farm house.
Soap-box oratory at city street
corners, spell-binding at thousands
of mass meetings, huge parades with
banners, placards, music, symbols
and u n i f o r m s demonstrate the
strength of the army of voters
pledge, to uphold democracy.
Woment conducted 'house to house
canvasses; youths, when not on
"field duty" drilling and marching,
distribute pamphlets and newspapers
by the million.
Irk parades the "schufo," shock
troops of the reichsbanner revived
since the ban on political uniforms
was lifted, lead the way. Behind
them come men, women and children
in more or less orderly battalions,
singing republican songs and shout-
ing defiance to fascism.
The "iron frontfrs," as these anti-
fascists call themselves, have a new
scarlet flag. It shows three diagonal
darts, representing the will to pierce

Hitlerism and symbolizing "activity,
discipline and unity."
Another device is a new salute, a
balled fist raised high. It shows
what the iron front thinks of the
fascist salute of the brown shirts, an
open palm at arm's length.
The darts have a good practical
application. Drawn through one of
"the thousands of nazi swastikas
painted on every back fence in Ger-
many, they completely obliterate it.
On the other hand only a full can
of paint can overcome the darts.
Also a few deft daubs can change
the swastika into a caricature of a
wildly retreating nazi.
Leaders of the social democrats
and of the centrists parties are high-
ly encouraged by the showing that
their campaign forces are making in
the provinces and smaller cities.
"We never have been in ar better
fighting mood," said Hoeltermann.
"It is as if we were just back from
a long vacation."
So the fight has become bitter.
Hitler has been made the subject of
uncomplimentary phrases.

TYPEWRITERS, all makes, bought,
sold, rented, exchanged, repaired.
O. D. MORRILL, 314 So. State.
--c
TYPEWRITING AND M I M E O-
GRAPHING promptly and neatly
done. O. D. MORRILL, 314 So.
State St.--c
LOST AND FOUND
LOST -Green Parker fountain pen.
Finder call 3506. Liberal reward.
-0
LOST--Pair of glasses in case. Find-
er call Michigan Daily, dial 21214.
--1
LOST-Not if your furs are stored
here. Our policy protects your furs
completely 12 months. Zwerdling's
Fur Shop. Complete fur service
since 1904.. -c
WANTED
WASHING AND IRONING WANT-
ED-Will call for and deliver.
Soft water used; washing done
separate. Phone 2-3478. -c
WANTED-Laundry. So f t water.
21044. Towels free, socks darned.
TYPING-Theses a specialty. Call
M. V. Hartsufl, 9087. -0

the law.

Oklahoma' ' Past Governors

California, on July 1 ,had the great-
est number of licensed pilots, 3,497.

, - . Ii

Are Active in State Politics

N"

OKLAHOMA CITY, July 28. -
(AP)-Oklahoma governors may be
impeached, but they live through it.
As the commonwealth prepares to
celebrate the silver annivarsary of its
statehood* this fall, it finds all eight
of its past chief executives active -in
business.
Charles N. Haskell, first governor
of the state who took office in 1907
when the capital was at Guthrie,
made and lost a fortune in oil. Now
he is interested in gas distribution
systems at Muskogee and Sapulpa.
He is still 'active in politics and was
a delegate to the 1932 democratic
national convention.
Robert L. Williams, second gover-
nor, is federal judge for the eastern
district of Oklahoma.
Lee Cruce for years has engaged
in law practice at Ardmore, Okla.,
and is interested in hotel properties
there.
J. B. A. Robertson opened a law
office in Oklahoma City following his
retirement from the governor's chair.
J. C. (Jack) Walton, first Okla-
homa executive to be impeached, has
turned his attention -to the oil in-
dustry. This year he re-entered state

politics as a candidate for corpora-
tion commissioner.
Ed Trapp, Walton's successor, now
deals in oil and gas leases and royal-
ties.
Henry S. Johnston, impeached and
removed by th 1929 legislature, re-
turned to law practice at Perry,
Okla., but the following year ran for
the United States senate. His race
v7as unsuccessful.
But this year he filed as a candi-
date for the state senate, hoping to
defeat Jo Ferguson, 'who voted to
remove Johnston as governor.
W. J. Holloway, who took the chair
upon Johnston's removal, remained
in Oklahoma City when his term ex-
pired to open a law office.
Meantime the incumbent Gover-
nor Murray, against whom threats of
impeachment have frequently been
made but never carried out, has his
hands full politically.

MAJESTIC
LAST TIMES TODAY
The First Soviet Talking Picture

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t
s
.
N,
,
4
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-.

It's so Easy to Replenish
Your SUMMER WARDROBE,
i in The Collins Shoppe.. .
CLEARANC
Crepes ... Chalk Crepes... Chiffons
Shantungs ... Sheers ... Organdies
(bought to sell at $16.75 to $25)
95

Prominent educators
claim "The Road To
Life" to be a Necessary
Leson to every person
interested in sociology,
biology or political sci-
ence, as well as a most
valuable document of
the greatest experi-
ment of cowtemporary
times.

"The ROAD
TO LIFE"
_4n intimate picture of Rus-
sian social problems told
dynamically to thrill you -

Nu
Increase
in
Prices
25c
until
2 P.M.
Evenings
40c

.

REMEMBER: English Titles make this pieture as readily under-
standable as the silent films of a few years ago.

~7&~LW42zrSppe
East Liberty at Maynard
"Exclusiveness without Extravagance"
INTO A MODERN WOLD

0

R IDE at'
MULLISON
SA DDL E STA BLES
. OUT WEST HURON ST.
PHONE 7418

NOW-
- also - LAUGHS AND THRILLS
C¢YFOR EVERYONE
"Fast
CARTOON p dF S
AND NEWS CompanionS"
25c Until 2. P.M. Race Track Melodrama of
3c A fter 2the sort that entertains
30c Aftr 2 % very minute!
40c Nights MI!H
X41 _--

STEPPI NG

7

.

U

71

LC 1ET

PRICES

I

v

IN 18 YEARS

Finding Our Prices

So

Low Many

Bought Two and Three Pairs

I

w-
Fitting the service
to the customer's needs

. . ,

1500 Pairs Shoes Must Be Sold
For Cash in Just Three Weeks
CET TO THIS SALE AT ONCE

Bell System service is custom-made. Each of
the 65,000,000 telephone calls handled in the
average day must meet the exact wishes of
the person making the 9all.
Telephone men study a customer's com-
munication needs, then advise the type of
equipment that fits them best. For depart-
nent stores they may recommend the "order
turret" -- a special switchboard for taking
orders by telephone. Thus they enlarge the

store's service and simplify ordering for the
customer. They develop equipment and plans
for brokerage houses, police departments,
nation-wide sales forces -- and all manner of
business firms.
The telephone industry continues to grow
by fitting its service more and more com-
pletely/ to the user's needs. For men with
insight and the ability to coordinate, the
opportunity is there4

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