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July 28, 1932 - Image 4

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1932-07-28

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I

TH E MICHIGAN iAILY

THURSDAY, JULY 28, 1

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
Publication in the Bulletin is constructive notice to all members of the
University. Copy received at the office of the Dean of the Summer Session
until 3:30, excepting Sundays. 11:30 a. m. Saturda.y.
VOLUME XIII THURSDAY, JULY 28, 1932 NUMBER 27
Excursion No. 10--Put-in-Bay: On Friday, July 29, Professor W. H.
Hobbs, of the Department of Geology, will conduct the Unveri4y party
going on the all-day trip to Put-in-Bay, in the southwestern portion of
Lake Erie 60 miles by boat from Detroit. A trip along the cliffs and visits
to the caves will be of chief geologic ijiterest.
Expenses are substantially below those of previous years: round trip bus
fare to and from Detroit, $1.50; round trip on steamer, special rate to Uni-
versity party, $.55; admissions to three caves, $.30. Students bringing pic-
nic lunches can keep all expenses well under $3.00. Students going in pri-
vate cars need no bus tickets. Steamer tickets and bus reservations( if
desired) must be secured in Room 9 University Hall before Thursday, July
28,5:00 p,im.
At 7:30 a m., from the east entrance of Natural Science building, spe-
cial buses will take the party directly to the dock at the foot of First Street,
petroit. The steamer leaves at 9:30 a. m. On the return trip, the steamer
reaches Detroit abQut 10:00 p. m., enabling the party to be back in Ann
Artor shortly before 12:00 1. in.
Reading Examinations in French: Examinaations to test the reading
knowledge of French requited for the degree of Ph.D., will be offered to
candidates in the departments listed below on Saturday, August 6, at 9
a. m., in room 108 Romance Languages Building. Students wishing to pre-
sent themselves must register on or before July 30, in room 112 or room 100
Romance Languages Building,
This announcement applies only to candidates for the degree of Ph.D.
in the following departments of Greek, Latin, English, German, History,
Economics, Sociology,'Political Science, Philosophy, and Education.
Theatre Picture Exhibit: By arrangement with the publishers, D. Ap-
pleton & Co., an exhibition of original drawings by Thomas Wood Stevens
is on view in the Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre lobby. They are from Mr.
Steven's recent book, "The Theatre from Athens to Broadway," and rep-
resent various phases in the development of the stage.
University Men and Women: The Food Department of the Michigan
League Building is to be closed July 31st for reorganigation and repairs.
k No meals will be served on or after that date until further notice. All other
departments of the League will continue as usual.
University High School Assnembly: A demonstratiop assembly of the
University High School Summer Session will be held at eleven o'clock Fri-
day morning in the University High School auditorium. The program is
being presented by pupils in the general science and social studies clasAes.
Any Summer Session students who are interested are welcome to attend
the assembly.
Golf Demonstration-Women Students: Mr. Raymond Courtright will
give a demonstration of golf strokes at 4 o'clock Thursday on the Mi 6i-
gan Golf Course. Women students registered in golf are to attend this ex-
hibition instead of their regular class.
Mixed and Women's Tennis Tournament: An open tennis tournament
for students is to be held on Palmer Field courts beginning August 2nd.
Entries are to be made at the Women's Athletic Building by August 1st at
the information desk. The events will be: Mixed doubles; Women's
doubles; Women's singles. A charge of 25 cents will be made for.eachi
event. Players may register singly for the doubles events if they wish.
Treasure Hunt-Women Students: Women students are invited to at-
tend the treasure hunt, swim, and supper on Friday, Juy 29th. Students
intending to go should sign up in Room 15, Barbour Gymnasium by Fri-
day noon. A fee of 25 cents will be charged. The party will start from
Barbour .Gymnasium at 5:30 o'clock.
Michigan State College Students: The annual Michigan State College
banquet will be held at the Michigan Union Thursday, July 28 at 6 p. m.
All members and their wives are requested to be present. Professor Car-
rothers and Mr. E. E. Gallup will speak.
Chinese Students- You are urged to be present at the club picnic at
Island Park Saturday, July 30. Please meet at Lane Hall at 2 p. m. Bring
your friends along.
Michigan Dames: Picnic will be held at Portage Lake today. Lunch
will be served at 6:00. Bringyour own dishes and sandwiches; also one
large dish of food to pass. For transportation call Mrs. William Jenkins,
6448.
Wesley Hall: Dr. Fisher will deliver the last lecture in the series
AStatesman of the Living East" today at 4 p. m. at Wesley Hall. His topic
will be "Mahatma Gandhi, Prophetic Statesman of Organized Love."
A Chicago hotel sends all odd A new city hall ahd court house
stamps received on its mail to chari- for St. Paul, )Minn., 21 stories tall
table institutions in Germany which and costing $3,,500,000, will be ready
sell them to philatelists. for occupancy in October.

Map G. 0. P. Campaign Oratory

Grim Wartime Von Papen Now
Jovial Contrast to Bruening 5

BERLIN, July 27.- (AP) -Many
Americans who remember Franz von
Papen, one-time German military at-
tache in Washington and now chan-
cellor of; the German reicll, picture
him as 'stern, military and ruthless.
Instead, should they come to Ger-
many today, they would be surprised
to see instead a Sovial, good-hu-
mored, hail-fellow-well-met type of
man heading Germany's political
government.
Von Papen is the very antithesis of
his studious, over-working bachelor
predecessor, Heinrich Bruening.
Bruening shunned social gather-
ings-von Papen on the first day of
his chancellorship was seen dining
and dancing at a fashionable res-
taurant.
Bruening took no interest in sports
-von Papen was never too busy at
Lausanne to take his daily dip in
Lake Geneva.
Bruening belonged to no club-von
Papen is a director of one of Ger-

many's most exclusive social organi-
zations, the "Herrenklub."
Bruening never catered to popu-
larity-von Papen seems to believe
that a statesman must be seen fre-
quently in public.
Thus, on the very day that he re-
turned from Lausanne, he did not,
like his predecessor on his return'
from visits abroad, closet himself in
the chancellery to wade through ac-
.umulated papers and correspon-
dence, but went straight to the Rot-
Weiss tennis club to see the European
Davis Cup semifinals.
Both Have Personal Charm
Bruening was most reticent when
it came to utterances before the
press. Von Papen fairly exuded press
interviews during the Lausanne con-
ference, and before and after his
return.
Both Bruening and von Papen un-
deniably possess a personal charm.
In Bruening's case his illuminating
smile seems to furnish the frame

that casts' his innate honesty and
personal integrity into sharper relief.
In von Papen's case the smile is
that of a man of the world and of
the professional diplomat who has
disciplined himself to "keep smil-
ing.~
Both Bruening and von Papen are
devout Catholics. If Bruening were
suddenly to appear in the robe of a
cardinal, nobody who knows his as-
cetic face would be surprised. Von
Papen in such a garb is harder to
imagine.
Bruening took to broadcasting on
very rare occasions only. VonPapen
often broadcasts addresses to the
Greman nation,.
Sends Undertaker $680,
Then Commits Suicide
After sending $680 in gold savings
and a white nightgown to the under-
taker, Mrs. Florah M. Bailey, Man-
chester, Mich., widow, yesterday shot
and killed herself in her home. Offi-
cers believe she took her life because
of despondency over ill health. She
leaves a cousin, Mrs. F. Mason, of
Howell, Mich.

(Associated Press Photo)
Rep. C. William Ramseyer (right) of the sixth Iowa district has
been named head of the Republican speakers' bureau for the national
campaign. Conferring with him is Everett Sanders, chairman of the
national committee.
Remem erin Foreign Nations'
Fete Days Is Easy for Hoover

WASHINGTON, July 27.-(AP)-
Probably the easiest of President
Hoover's jobs is remembering the
birthday or ;inational fete day of
every fellow president, king or efn-
peror in the world.
As a matter of fact it's a system-
set up just to jog his memory to
avoid the breach of international eti-
quet that would ensue if no telegram
of congratulation were dispatched on
such a day.
In the state department, a few
paces from the President's office,
what might be called a "birthday
book" is kept in the hands of a cere-
monial officer, skilled in the correct
phraseology of international felici-
tation.
It is the job of this officer-Charles
Lee Cook-to inform the White
House of which birthday and. inde-
pendence day is which, and to see
that the President's messages don't
get into the error of repeating them-
selves year and year.
Drafting messages is comparative-
ly easy as almost without exception
they are brief. Last Saturday, for
instance, "h i s imperial majesty,
Haile Selassie I, emperor of Ethio-
pia," enjoyed a birthday and the
following message was awaiting him
When he awoke in Addis Ababa:
"Permit me to extend to youi ma-
jesty on this birthday anniversary

cordial congratulations of the gov-
ernment and people of the United
tates and my own personal greet-
ings. Herbert Hoover."
Sometimes two or three messages
are dispatched in a week, and some-
times almost none in a month.
BRIGHT SPOT
802 Packard Street
TODAY 11:30 to 1:30
Swiss Steak
Roast Pork
--Browned Potatoes and Carrots
Creamed Chipped Beef on Toast
with Poached Eggs.
Waldorf Saladwith Cold Pork
Sandwich
Fresh Raspberry Whip
Cake - Ice Cream
Coffee - Milk - Punch
30c
Soup
Liver and Bacon
Swiss Seak - Fried Onions
Roast Pork, Apple Sauce
and Sweet Potatoes
Roast Beef, Mushroom Sauce'
Lamb Chop grilled with Bacon
Sausage and Tomato
Mased or Au Gratin or
Candied Sweet Potatoes
Green Beans - Vegetable Salad
, Creamed Corn
Cake - Pie -- Ice Cream - Melons
Coffee Tea Milk
40c

MICHIGAN REPERTORY PLAYERS
SeatsPhone
75c 6300
6
THURSDAY, FRIDAY AND SATURDAY NIGHTS AT 8:15
' The most unusual play pnesented in Ann Arbor!
Gorgeous Costumes, Vermillion Lattices, Jade Green Pavilions
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
" "'()""> fa < t'">)-"'')"!<'"""> <""""" > <"""">r<'"""> <"",'")<'""'>()e''">t<"e"0<'"""' rt""""" t}<'"''"t) " "yo

1

]cantt
Beauty Shoppe
All Experienced Operators
BEAUTIFUL $10 PERMANENT WAVES . $5
Steam Hot Oil Treatment, Facial, Manicures,
Shampoo, Finger Waves, Marcels, Hair Cuts.
PHONE 8878

41

r Prchasec in New York last week!
Nearly 200 New Summer Dresses
at Unheard of Discounts
Manufacturers clearing their stocks, accepted V
our cash and made tremendous concessions to us.
These we pass on to our patrons.
YOUR CHOICE
264 beautiful new summer
SILK ;[
er
_i FROCKS
'Sizes12 to 44- 16'2 to 24
.85
T 7
W ashables, Sheers, Pastels,
Monotones, Prints, etc.
Values to $16.9 5
} YOUR CHOICE
188 bright new crisp
p _COTTON
$3.85 .
Linens, Eyelets, Piques,
4 Seersuckers, Voiles, etc.
Values to $ 5.9.5

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Making ItWork

41

World's Fastest Hair Dryers

and Making It Sell
Time was whep you could sell Mr. John Q Public a
*adio or an automobile merely by showing hin that
it worked. Today he takes :hat for granted.
Now he must be shown that it works better, looks bet-
ter, is easier to operate than any past or present model.
Today the all-important element in an articleis sales-
appeal. And the. all-important member of the manu-
facturer's staff is the man who designs this sales-appeal
into the product-the product engineer. He is the man who
gave you free-wheeling in your automobile, who made
it possible for textile mills to use one machine in place
of several and countless other product improvements
Produ'ct engineering is still in its infancy. But like most
infants, it's growing fast. Already there are product
engineers guiding the destinies of most all our impor-
tant plants. And they're all facing similar problems it
their work.

1 1

MMJESTIC

The First Soviet Talking Picture

ii

Business men, industrialists and engi-
neers-600,000 of them-regularly read
the McGraw- Hill Publications. More
than 3,000,000 use McGraw-Hill books
and magazines in their business.
The Business Week Radio Retailing
System Electronics
Aviation Product Engineering
Factory and Industrial Engineeringand
Management Mining Journal
Power Engineering and
Maintenance Mining World
Engineering Metal and
Mineral Markets
Coal Age Electric Railway Journal
Textile World Bus Transportation
Fnnl ..sitrc AmrianMchnis

Prominent educators
claim "The Road To
Life" to be a Necessary
Leson to every person
inte)ested in sociology,
biology or political sci-
ence, as well as a most

"The ROAD
TO LIFE"

No
Increase
in
Prices
25c
until

Ever alert to new trends in engineering, McGraw Hill
was quick to sense this group's deed for a common
meeting ground. This itprovided in the form of a new
magazine-Product Engineering. Ask your librarian for

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