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July 16, 1931 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1931-07-16

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TvWO

SUl1+IMER MI( IIGAN DAILY

TIiURSDAY, JULY 16, 1931

TWO HE SMMERMICHGAN AIL THUSDAY JUL 16,193

Pubaishe very morning except Monday
durizg the university Summer Session by the
Board in Control of Student Publications.
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled
to the usee for republication of all .news dire-
patdes credited to it or not otherwisecredited
in this paper and the local news published
herein. All rights oarepublication of special
dispatches herein are also reserved.
Entered at the Ann Arbor, Michigan, post-
ofice as second class matter.
Subscription by carrier, $1.50; by mail,
$176.
,Offices: Press Building, Maynard Street,
Ann_ Arbor, Michigan.
Telephones:" EdItorial, 4925; Business
2.1214.
EDITORIAL STAFF
MANAGING EDITOR
HAROLD O. WARREN, JR.
Editorial Director .......... Gurney Williams
ASSOCIATE EDITORS
C. W. Carpenter Carl Meloy
L. R. Ghubb Sher M. Quraishi
Barbara Hafl Fleanor Rairdon
Charles C. Irwin Edgar Racine
Susan Manchester Marion Thornton
P. Cutler Showers
BUSINESS STAFF
BUSINESS MANAGER
WILLIAM R. WORBOYS
Assistant Business Manager .. Vernon Bishop
Contracts Manager............ ..Carl Marty
A dvertising Manager.......... Jack Bunting
Accounts. Circulationk.........Thomas Muir
THURSDAY, JULY 16, 1931
Night Editor-C. W. CARPENTER

FINANCIAL
INFECTION
It must be disagreeable to Presi-
dent Hoover to learn that the mora-
torium plan proposed by him as
a life-saving measure for Germany
and hence a life preserver for the
rest of the world, has not been b
itself sufficient to pull Germany ou
of her financial slough; but it mus
be a source of satisfaction for hin
to realize that his bold step ha
thoroughly' awakened the economi
world to the necessity of pullin
Germany back onto comparatively
safe ground.
Activities during the past fe
days have been fast and furious
Bank runs developed in Germany
hundreds of millions of dollars wer
transferred and bartered abou
with bewildering rapidity, and th
danger of a fatal world-wide finan
cial infection appeared imminen
The result is that Germany ha
been extended credit and a gen
eral panic has been averted.
"It must be realized that th
generosity on the part of Unite
States and foreign banks is some
thing mre than altruistic, for i
is an obvious fact that to save the
Reischbank and associate institu
tions is to confine financial rui
to a limited area; nevertheless it i
gratifying to know that internat
Tonal red tape is being torn up ir.
the present feverish spasm of co
operation.
UNSATISFACTORY
GOLF BALL
The present agitation in favor o
repealing the new golf ball come
out of something more than th
disgruntled murmurings of habit
bound sportsmen unwilling to mak
a change. From every nook an
cranny of the country, whereve
golfers waggle clubs over the "bal
loon" ball, the increasingly insis
tent demand for a change back t
the old ball is remarkably consis.
tent in its objections.
The new ball, decreed by the Uni-
ted States Golf Asociation, ha
proved to be a nuisance from tee t
green; it is short on the drive, er-
ratic in any sort of wind, scarcel
ever .straight n short pitch shots
and a devilishly maddening, frog-
hopping pest on the putting green
Perhaps the U.S.G.A. was justified
in forcing the general adoption o
the new ball on the grounds thai
game was "too easy" but in th
light of the current storm of dis-
approval it is difficult to under-
stand why the Association does not
admit its error and give up the bal-
loon ball as a bad job.
GET
ACQUAINTED
Monday night a Daily reporter
came upon a Scotish female dele-
gate of the British and American
Students Conference endeavoring to
post a letter in what appeared to
her to be a perfectly air tight mail
box. The reporter laughed with
her, not at her, and the communi-
cation was posted satisfactorily
after the intricacies of the Ameri-
can Postal system had been ex-
plained.
,That incident alone suggests that
Summer Session students are of-
fered an unusual opportunity this
week to meet and talk to the visit-
ing group of British students, many
of whom are visiting the United
States for the first time. A half
hour talk with one of them will
prove more interesting than a doz-

What Others Say
EXTRAORDINARY1
PALOOKAS1
(The Detroit Saturday Night) ,
Are you interested in "Mosaic'
Diseases of the Bean?" If you are'
not, put yourself down as a garden
variety moron unable to appreciate
the artistic beauties of higher edu-
cation. For at the University of
Michigan a learned gentleman has
just spent several years preparing
a thesis on the subject, and has
been awarded his "doctor's" degree
for the same.
Perhaps you are not stupid but
only narrow, however. Maybe you
would prefer to read something on
"The Effect of the Oral Adminis-
tration of Bromobenzene to the
Dog . . .", or "The Habitat, Distri-
bution, and Life Histories of the
Crane Flies of Northern Florida."
You will probably laugh and say
that nothing but a lunatic would be
interested in the life history of a
crane fly. That will just stamp you
further as a member of the intel-
lectual proletarist, for a doctor's
degree was awarded on that score
also.
Don't confuse these doctor's de-
grees with the ordinary knife and
pill variety of doctor. The gents
that go in for crane flies and beans
are not ordinary palookas in the
educational world like the strugg-
ling medical students. They are
the intellectual highbrows, the ne
plus ultra of educational circles.
They are the boys who will swarm
out into the big colleges and uni-
versities and teach freshmen rhe-
toric. They are the elite of modern
education-the survivors of seven
or eight or more years of high pres-
sure learning. Their degrees are
"Ph.D." instead of mere "M.D.",
You probably know all about
mice. If you do not, and want to
become educated, write for "A
Comparative Life History Study of
the Mice of the Genus Peromyscus."
If frogs and worms are your spe-
cialty ask for "Life History Studies
on Two Frog Lung Flukes."'
"Flukes," we understand, are some
kind of parasitic worms that live
inside of frog lungs. Be the life of
the party; know about frog flukes.
"Germ Cell Origin and Sex Dif-
s ferentiation in the Common Musk
1 Turtle" is one of the more racy
numbers published at the univer-
sity. But for sheer scientific mas-
Stery of a subject the palm goes t
the man who wrote "The Loco-
1 motion of Snakes and Its Anatomi-
s cal Basis." Now that the locomo-
- tion is understood it should be a
r simple matter to equip your snake
with tire chains and take him out
in all sorts of weather.
Perhaps you go in for light read-
ing. Well, let us recommend "The
Polymerization of Asymmetrica
f Diaryl and Arylalkylethylenes and
Studies in the Quinoidation of Ary-
lalkylchoromethanes." We recom-
mend, also, the dissertation on
"Symmetric Functions and Sym-
metric Functions of Symetric Func-
r tions."
"A Comparative Study of the
Transplantability of Eight Mam-
mary Gland Tumors Arising in In-
bred Mice" is another number
which is sure to have widespread
social consequences in dissuading
mice from inbreeding. "The Life
History of the Trematode" (trema-
tode-flat worm) is a piece of bio-
graphical work which will be to

worms what Boswell's Life of John-
son is to humanity.
For reading in street cars and
subways there are such delightful
bits as "Chromolsome Studies in
Nicandra Physaloides" and "Sporo-
genesis in Begonia Schmidtiana
Regel and the Determination of its
Sex."
There is a dissertation on "The
Seasonal Migration of the Mule
Deer," which will certainly fasci-
nate all lovers of mule deer. Among
the simpler titles which abound in
the list is "Synthetic Laxatives,"
which won a Ph.D. for a student
in chemistry.
It must not be gathered that
Michigan is the only university in-
vestigating the higher realms of
learning in this manner. A doc-
tor's thesis was written several
years ago at another great Ameri-
can university on "The Evolution
of the Hot Dog," and one is now in
preparation at another campus on
"corsets." Education is a wonder-+
ful thing.
o--

infrequently forgotten by social,
theorists. All too often, he said,
scientific discoveries of great im-
portance are made, published, re-
jected or ignored by scientific con-
temporaries and presently forgot-
ten. Acceptance of Avogadro's law
of the interactions of molecules
thus was delayed for forty years.
Everyone knows the story of Gregor
Mendel's experiments on the laws
of inheritance, also buried for a
generation before their rediscovery
made possible the modern science
of heredity. A Russian named Lo-
monossoff, who died in 1765, held
modern theories, Professor Ban-
croft said, of heat, of chemical oxi-
dation and of the nature of light
'waves; all of them a half century
or more too soon to gain scientific
acceptance. These important ad-
vances now stand credited to
others, a fact now unimportant to
Lomonossoff, but which indicates
a faltering of progress by no means
negligible to those who dream of
speeding a scientific millennium.
Professor Bancroft's suggested
remedy is that great scientists must
also be super-salesmen, able to
make the world believe quickly in
what they do. Undoubtedly this
generation possesses several such
men as Millikan, Jeans and Ein-
stein to make science understand-
able constitute, whether conscious-
ly or accidentally, a "sales cam-
paign" remarkably successful not
only in the superficial aim of stim-
ulating popular interest but in pro-
viding increased social and finan-
cial support for all kinds of scien-
tific work. Yet it may be doubted
if all this super-salesmanship in the
world has hastened or could hasten
the weaving of really new dis-
coveries into the fabric of men's
minds.
There seems to be something like
a speed limit to scientific progress
and this, after all, need not be un-
expected. People often think of
scientific discovery as though it
were a process outside of mankind,
like an explorer advancing slowly
over country which may have been
uncharted but was always in exis-
tence. This, philosophers insist, is
a naive idea. What really happens
is inside the human mind. Better
and better pictures, or at least
newer and newer ones, are painted
there year by year to represent
what we are pleased to call reality.
' When Lomonossoff discovered
- something that his contemporaries
would not accept, this was merely
Y because the average mental canvas
- of those contemporaries was not
- yet ready for that particular pic-
° ture. This canvas seems to unrol
at a nearly constant rate, like the
- film of a motion picture camera
If any procession of discovery
a moves too fast for this film it sim-
° ply is not recorded until the facts
come back to march past again
this time more slowly.
e o--
The Wickersham commission
with surprising unanimity de-
nounces "trial by press". We're glad
they've found something nice and
vague they can agree on.
-- -
"Arnold-Forster wants equality
in disarmament," says a headline.
The difficulty, as we see it, lies in
r persuading various Chicago gang-
sters to acquisce in a treaty on
r such terms.
-0-a--
Ii 'I

Campus Opinion
Contributors are asked to bebrief,
confining themselves to less than 300
C words if possible, noymuscomn-
muanications wrill be disregarded. The
S mes of communicants will, however,
be regarded as confidential, upon re-
quest. Letters pub"ished should not be
construed as expressing the editorial
0,3iIuOn Of1The D1. ily.
HELP
BY SPENDING
To the Editor:
Having read the criticism of the
"lavish display of feminine dress"
as voiced in Tuesday's Daily, I do
think that the writer has viewed
the circumstances from but one an-
gle. Does he consider that one of
the many things which is keeping
up the depression is that people are
ceasing to buy as they did in bet-
ter days, regardless of their extent
of wealth? Everywhere shops are
closing down and people are out
of work because trade has been on
a steady decline. I heartily approve
the fact that the women take such
pride in their personal appearance
that they make Dossible the pur-
chase of such things. If the money
were not spent in this way it would
most surely be placed in the bank
and saved, thereby not helping any-
one but the saver. It seems to me
that the best way to help out is by;

GROUCH C
GRIPE
NYAH
There are certain elements in the
life of the Summer Session student
that make Ann Arbor existence far
from ideal. One of the most prom-
inent of thse is the University.
* * *
Ever since three weeks ago when
we registered, we have been trying
to get a permit to drive our car.
After the first two days of filling
out pink slips and white cards, we
ran up against the Regents or
somebody about as bad. They said
we had to have insurance before
we could drive our crate. We said
we had to have a lot of assurance
before we would drive the thing.
* * *
Day before yesterday what our
insurance company wittily terms
its "home office" woke up and sent
us our policy. We dashed down to
the Dean's office with a gleam in
our eye. $15 that insurance had
cost us, but it was worth that to be
able to drive out for a swim in the
afternoon. Then the girl told us
we had to pay another dollar be-
fore the University would permit-
get that-PERMIT us to drive OUR
OWN CAR.
* * *
And that dollar of ours will prob-
ably go to pay another of those
annoying administrative officials-
probably the same one that first
thought up this gag about charg-
ing us a dollar for driving our car.
* * *
But we paid that dollar because
we wanted to go swimming in the
afternoon. And then we discovered
that the moths had eaten up all
the crucial places in our swimming
suit.
* * *
About noon, however, we had full
permission of President Ruthven
the Board of Regents, the office of
the Dean, the Building and Grounds
department, and the graduate
reading rooms of the General li-
brary to not only own but operate
our motor vehicle, and after asking
for divine permission, we walked
. out of U. hall with a new light in
1 our eye and started over to State
Street to get a milk shake for lunch.
And at that point we were stopped
by fivesmall, vociferously importu-
nate females who collectively and
-plaintively demanded that we give
1 our last nickel to send a nameless
little orphan boy who has half-
. dead from tuberculosis and ade-
noids and who had had rickets
when a child and who had never
seen the sun save through a cloud
of nasty old factory smoke and who
didn't know a glass of milk from
a glass of milk off to a six day va-
cation at a Fresh Air Camp where
he would gain fifty pounds, grow
- a foot, become a National diving
champ, learn to box, wrestle, play
ball, and become a good citizen with
high ideals and a reclaimed human
being.
W E B O U G H T A T A
That left us with no dinner.
* * *
To make the day perfect, we went
to see Liliom. Now Liliom, as you
must all know by this time, means
tough in Hungarian. You'll get a
better idea what it means in Chris-
tian, however, if you go see the

show for yourself.
S* *
One scene in particular we
thought was pretty tough. A lot
of people stood around looking at
a young lady in a big skirt who was
looking at a corpse. They kept
whispering to her things we couldn't
hear from where we sat. And she
kept saying, "Yes, yes" to them, all
of which got rather tiresome; so
we went out for a malted milk (the
check came in the afternoon mail)
and when we came back, they were
still at it-whispering and yessing
one another.
* * *
Liliom is a nice show, though. We
were rather interested in seeing it
after reading yesterday's story in
The Daily, where we were informed
in a headline that "Windt Gives Di-
rection."
* * *
We should like to call attention
to the fact that MAIL IS BEING
HELD in the Summer Session of-
fice for a lot of people with fun-
ny names. And we wish that af-
ter Nellie Wee Wee and Mortimer
Piddle and Thyroid Whishy do get
their mail, they would come around
here to the Daily office some after-
noon. We would like to get a look
at them.

SUBSCRIBE
TO THE
SUMMER
MICHIGAN DAILY

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The Broadway
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The funniest picture ever
made to measure for
WILLIAM
Aided and abetted by
DOROTHY MARJORIE
JORDAN RAMBEAU
and others
EXTRA
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RIPLEY NOVELTY
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SUNDAY
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SUNDAY
"ANNABELL'S AFFAIRS"

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ONE SUMMER DAY
Affords ample time for a delightful 120-mile
round trip cruise on Detroit river and
Lake Erie from Detroit to
PUT-IN-BAY ISLAND PARK
Scene of the Battle of Lake Erie. Golf, bathing, boating,
fishing, picnic in the grove or dine at the fine hotels. Perry
Victory monument and wonderful caves.
7 C FOR HE ROD. TRIP. CHILDREN A A
Return same day
Str. Put-In-Bay leaves foot of First St., Detroit, daIly, 9 a.m. Home at 8
p-m., except Fri.,10:15p.m.,for Put-In-Bay, Cedar Point and Sandusky,O.
$ 7 A BARGAIN TWO-DAY OUTING $7
The Crescent Hotel Company and Ashley & Dustin
SteamerLine have joined tooffer the extremely low rate of $7 fora two-day
outing at Put-In-Bay. Leave Detroit any dayat9a.m.,arrive la oon.Lunch
at Crescent Hotel, also evening dinner and room; breakfast and dinner
the next day. Round trip on steamer and dinner on the boat retuning.
CEDAR POINT
The Lido of America. Special excursions every Friday with over three
hours at the Point, $1.50 round trip; other days one hour stopover, fare
$1.75 round trip, Cedar Point or Sandusky. Return same day,.
DANCING MOONLIGHTS
Leave Detroit 845 p.m. Wednesday - Thursday, 60c.
Home 11:30 p.m. Saturday, Sunday, 75c.
Finzei's Snappy Bazd.

SPEED LIMIT
OF SCIENCE
(The New York Herald Tribune)
Professor Wilder D. Bancroft, of
Cornell, speaking recently at the
dedication of the science building
of the University of Southern Cali-

ASHLEY & DUSTIN STEAMER LINE

.

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