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August 08, 1931 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1931-08-08

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TM BUS04M BECUMAN, DAIM

SATURDAY, AUGUST 8, 1931

_ _ _01 ..iIG NDAESAUDA. AGST8_13

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Stxiptgmn Utt
lb imsded Preu s i styslly entte
w fe u/bliestioa at a elinws a&e
wsihd tNIt m not aothe Wls.ditsd
lrt PW mdthoels uveibiished
-A 3" t w~ e a. remm&.W p
hwd at -60 Ann Arbor, ihampot
so""WeW~alse matter.
!awilptse.by owsiers, $.10;by mt
OMM. Pm Bsuilding, Maynard Street,
a T sna iUler d, 4f9i Busines
EDITORIAL *TAFF
MANAGING EDITOR
HAROLD 0. WARREN, JR.
isseI Drete, . ... .....urney iliams
A32OCIATE EDITORS
06 *"Ch~v Sher U. Qurishi
qwam alEleanor Rairdon
Maket Marion Thornton
P. Outler Showers
SUSINUS S TAFF

What Others Say
A NEW
NAVAL POLICY
(Daily Iowan)
A navy second to none is the
policy announced by Secretary Ad-
ams, the first military policy of the
Hoover administration. European
critics will register surprise, to say
nothing about the attitude of Am-
erican pacificists, for hasn't the
United States been a staunch back-
er of disarmament?
A study of the new policy reveals,
however, that there is no need of
alarm; no cause for concern lest
the United States should be prepar-
ing for another war. The first class
naval policy is entirely in accord
with the London treaty of cruiser
tonnage limitation. Until this time
the United States has not been tak-
ing advantage of the maximum
tonnage allowance. Only small

SUNKU MANAWO[R cruisers have been constructed. No
WILLIAM R. WOROY the secretary of the navy declare
nGaaar. tyri that fewer cruisers will be built, bu
4dimtiCi ta aa;........lack Buntn that they will be of the larges
-esat.Circu lation.......Thomas Muir
type.
Nigh t E ditor-She r M. Qurhi "Our navy must be s t r o n
SATURDAY, AUGUST 8, 1931 enough,' says the secretary, "to sup
port the national policies and com
merce of the United States, as we
COORDINATED as to guard the continental an
PREPARATION overseas possessions." By this gaug
HAT Dean C. S. Boucher, of every country should measure it
naval requirements, and the secre
the University of Chicago, tary will have the support of ev
calls "the most fascinating scheme ery patriotic countryman in pur
in preparatory education yet de- suing this policy.
vised" has been followed for a year In the well rounded program o
at the Lake Forest (Illinois) Acad- expansion, the department has act
emy with tremendous success. ed wisely in promoting an increas
in air craft. The policy calls fo
There the recitation periods were completion of the rigid airship
extended to ninety minutes, forty- now under construction or appro
five minutes being devoted to dis- priated for and for an extension o
cussion and preparation of the next heavier-than-air activities. Th
day's work. Headmaster John W. maiden trip of Uncle Sam's ne
Richards recently announced the dirigible, "The Akron" next Tues
day will mark the first bold nave
following interesting results of the movement of the United State
plan: compared witn the averages since the Los Angeles took the ail
of the three preceding years, the several years ago. Americans wi.
percentage of failure in all subjects pride themselves in the fact tha
taught in 1930-31 at Lake Forest this country isnow possessor of th
has been reduced forty-seven per- world's largest airship. A progra
cent; and the honor roll has leng- is now afoot to perfect the speedi
thened twenty-one per cent. est and most efficient airplane fo
We are not surprised to learn naval purposes. The program is
that the idea has spread to other modern necessity and in keepin
schools. Any plan that presents a with current requirements of a larg
schedule in which more concentra- nation such as the United State
tion of work is possible, which en- The remarkable aspect of the ex
ables students to taste the routine pansion plan is that the Hoove
of a regular work day, and which economy program is reflected in it
more closely links secondary schools Assembling the active fleet will b
and colleges 'a bound to increase carried on two months of each yea:
the intellectual efficiency of the instead of three. The feat will no
student. We heartily endorse the be accomplished overnight. Yet th
scheme and hope shortly to hear policy forecasts constructive meas
that it has been adopted by all ures that will eventually material
important preparatory schools. ize in an adequate naval defense.,
But at the same time we see in
it a good example of what might ON THE
be accomplished by our colleges. FLGTHE
The present college system of ir- FLAGPOLE
regular classes, "free" days, and the (Daily Illini)
responsibility of the student; he
must, more or less, look after him- For some time we had wondere
self and plan his work effectively. just how long it would be before
He is in a great measure " on his co-eds took up the occupation o
own," dependent upon himself; how flagpole sitting. But at last it has
he manages his schedule is of little come to pass.
concern to the university until he Some ambitious young lady from
gets into trouble over neglected the University of Wisconsin, inteni
studies. The theory of individual upon remaining in school for an-
responsibility is a good idea, in the- other year, and finding her funds
ory, but to most of the less respon- were rather low, decided that it
sble students-the ones who need would't be a bad idea to replenish
boosts now and then-it's the bunk. he treasury; so she turned to the
The haphazard student takes ad- flagpole.
vantage of his uncontrollable lei- So the young lady, a certain Miss
sure, and college experience stamps Betty Fox, of Battle Creek, Mich.,
in bad habits rather than breaks situated herself on the peak of a
them. College students are far flagpole in that city and remained
from being the "men" they are sup- there for twenty-six hours, just long
posed to be. enough to break the women's en-
Further than that, we believe that durance record. But that wasn't
Mr. Richard's plan is the logical be- sufficient.
ginning of a number of years of A department store made her an
training for a business or profes- attractive offer. If she should go
sional world in which office hours to bed publicly in one of their dis-
are generally consistent. If pre- play windows, she would be the re-
paratory schools and colleges were cipient of a little additional prize
to adopt a schedule which re- money. So the young lady retired
sembles a work day in the outside and slept and slept, and slept,
world - which, of course, would while all around milling crowds
preclude the necessity of night pushed and shoved, waiting to get
work -students would lead far a glimpse at this courageous young
more regular lives, there would be lady.
closer supervision free from over- But reports have it that with the
paternalism and the gradual taking exception of the time she stirred
over of the business reins would be and partially exposed one leg, she
comparatively free from the dis- slept like any other 23-year-old
content and chaffing caused by rad- woman. And that's the report of
ical departures from the accustom- men witnessing the long sleep.
ed haphazard daily college life. Now, if any of our charming Il-
Now that Mr. Richard's plan is linois co-eds have an urge of set-
in a fair way to being adopted by: ting a new record, and cashing in
progressive secondary schools, it on the proceeds, no doubt it could
would be a good idea to look into; be arranged. Certainly the pub-

its value as a unit in the college1 lic could not be as tired of co-ed
situation. As we see it, the Lake flagpole sitting as long distance
Forest plan is superior to our col- air flight records, and that sort of
lege system, and if it links up pre- thing. Co-eds, just think what no-
paratory with higher schools, agtoriety lies in store for you.
change that would link collegesj
more closely with the business We hope the Paw Paw man who
world (at least in routine) would is to serve a five-day jail sentence
complete a much desired chain of in week - end installments is the

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Music & Drama
FLORENT SCHMITT: La Tragedie
de Salome: Suite for Orchestra:
played by the Orchestre des Con-
certs Straram under the direction
of the composer: for Columbia
Masterworks Series No. 157.
Florent Schmitt is now rounding
out thirty years' activity in musical
composition which have placed him
among the six or seven foremost
French composers. The first Amer-
ican issue of a major composition
by Schmitt is, as the Columbia fold-
er claims,o"an event of some impor-
tance in contemporary music." For
Schmitt, a pupil of Faure, is gen-
erally given by the majority of
Frenchmen more chance for sig-
nificant immortality than such men
as Ravel-whom America 'knows
thoroughly.
Nadia Boulanger attributes the
peculiar importance of Florent
Schmitt in contemporary music to
a peculiar fusion which he achieves
in music. She puts it thus: "Schmitt
was born in Lorraine and his music
clearly shows the traces of his dou-
ble Lation and Teutonic heredity.
Clarity, balance, restraint-that is,
what we normally call the Gallic
traits-are constantly alternating
with or being fused with the more
Germanic ideals of ponderous force,
imposing construction, abundance
of feeling."
The present work which Schmitt
himself has conducted for Colum-
bia is one of his earliest, though
one of his most famous, composi-
tions. It was originally written in
1907 as interludes and incidental
music for a ballet at the Theatre
des Arts. Later, the music was re-
orchestrated, given strictly sym-
phonic proportions, and has ever
since been one of the popular sym-
phonic suites on Paris programs.
As a ballet, it was adopted by the
Russian ballet, and in her recent
book of nemoirs, Mme. Karsavina
has spoken of her appearances in
it. It is now in the permanent
repertory of the Paris Opera, with
Ida Rubinstein dancing the title
part.
The Symphonic suite is composed
of two Preludes which establish
musically the setting and the ori-
ental atmosphere of the famous
story and of three actual dancing
scenes. The whole musical texture
is very rich: luxuriant in harmonies,
thick in counterpoint, and splendid
in orchestral color. But Schmitt's
most original means of expression
seems to lie in his rhythms. All
the pieces in the suite are full of.
rhythms of nervous force, which,
by virtue of their insistence neat-
ly establish the drama's air of the
sinister. The orchestra under the
composer plays with fine animation.
* * *
The Summer School Orchestra of
the School of Music under the bat-
on of David Mattern, with student
soloists, will give a program compli-
mentary to the public in Hill Audi-
torium tomorrow afternoon begin-
ning at 4:15 o'clock. The public
is respectfully urged by the School
of Music to be seated on time as
there will be no seating during
numbers.
The students who will appear
with the orchestra as soloists are
Mary Zollinger Gibson, soprano,
George Poinar, violinist, and Ethel
Stanton, pianist. The program is
as follows:
Overture, "Sakuntata" Goldmark
Concertstuck for Piano and Or-_

chestra Weber
Ethel Stanton
"Siegfried Idyl" Wagner
Aria, "Vol lo sapete" from "Caval-
leria Rusticana" Mascagui
Mary Zollinger Gibson
Concerto in G Minor for Violin and
Orchestra Bruch
George Poinar
Overture "New Orleans" (Mardi

FIRST METHODIST
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Cor. S. State and E. Washington Sts.
Dr. Frederick B. Fisher, Minister
10:45 A. M.-Morning Worship.
"THE DEMAND FOR PLAIN
SPEECH."
Bishop Adna W. Leonard
of Buffalo.
12:00 N.-Student Bible Class, Wes-
ley Hall.

t . 1 e '1
tt[ th T f i i ti t tu{ m tit 1 t I
n -Aff

6:00 P.
Wesley
Bennett

M.-Devotional Meeting,
Hall. Speaker: Professor
Weaver.

ST. ANDREW'S
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Division and Catherine Streets
Reverend Henry Lewis, Rector
Reverend Duncan B. Mann, Assistant
8:00 A. M.-Holy Communion.
10:00 A. M.-Brotherhood of St.
Andrew's Bible Class, Harley
Kline leader.
11:00 A. M.-Summer Kindergarten.
Miss Eunice Campbell, director.
11:00 A. M.-Morning Prayer and
Sermon by the Reverend Duncan
E. Mann.
Tuesday open house at Harris Hall
from four to six.
I ..

FIRST CHURCH
CHRIST, SCIENTIST
409 S. Division St.
10:30 A. M.-Regular Morning
ice. Sermon topic: "Spirit."
11:45 A. M.--Sunday School follow-
ing the morning service.
7:30 P. M.-Wednesday Evening
testimonial meeting.
The Reading Room, 10 and 11
State Savings Bank Building, is open
daily from 12 to 5 o'clock, except
Sundays and legal holidays.

FIRST
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Huron and Division Sts.
Merle H. Anderson. Minister
Alfred Lee Klaer, University Pastor
10:45 A. M.-Morning Worship.
Sermon: "The Church," Alfred
Lee Klaer.
5:30 to 7:30 P. M.-Social Hour
and Young People's meeting at the
Church House, 1432 Washtington
Avenue.
THE
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCI
B. Huron, below State
R. Edward Sayles, Minister
Howard R. Chapman, Minister for
Students.
9:30 A. M.-The Church School.
Mr. Wallace Watt, Superintendent.
10:45 A. M.-Morning Worship.
Mr. Chapman will speak on
"RACIAL INHOSPITALITY."
Note-No other meetings today.

BE
CONSISTENT
IN
YOUR
RELIGION
ATTEND
CHURCH
REGULARLY

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Any prodigal son can write home
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PATEN'T
Fall marks fashions turning
point and now the earlier foot-
wear prophecies crystalize into
established facts.
PATENT LEATHER IS A
LEADER and in this shop you
can find it in Brown and Black.
Others
$5 to $8

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handsomely boxed for only
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TOLEDO, OHIO
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* * *
MOZART MASS TO BE BROAD-
CAST FROM SALZBURG
A rather unique radio event will
take place Sunday afternoon when
Mozart's Requiem Mass will be
broadcast from the town of his
birth, Salzburg, Austria over the
WABC-Columbia network from 3:30
to 4:30 p.m., E.D.S.T.
Gathered together in the an-
cient cathedral city for the Mozart
Festival this month are some of
the world's greatest conductors,
singers, and instrumentalists, with
the Vienna Philharmonic Orches-
tra, chorus of the Vienna State
Opera, and a cast from La Scala,
Milan.
The Requiem Mass is one of the
strangest Mozart works. Mozart
wrote it in anticipation of his own
death and was not spared to fin-
ish it. It is unique in the traces
in the music of that agony of spirit
which was so intense a part of Mo-
zart the man yet so seldom crept

I

NOW-
Paramount's Surprise Hit!
of A oEd
with
PHILLIPS HOLMES
NORMAN FOSTER
SYLVIA SIDNEY
SUNDAY
"iCommon Law"
with CONSTANCE BENNETT

11; 1

I

I

-I-

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