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August 05, 1931 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1931-08-05

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WEDN S AYAUGUST 5. 1931

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NAYY ORGANIZATION
W ILL PERMIT QUICK
XPANSION CLAIM
Department's Policy Statement
Emphasizes Importance of
Rapid Mobilization.
PLANS FOR EMERGENCY
Fleet Should Be Strong Enough
to Support National Policy,
Adams Believes.
WASHINGTON, Aug. 4.-(A)-
Maintenance of the Naval estab-
lishment In such a state as to per-
mit rapid expansion in the event of
war was emphasized in a new state-
ment of the United Statesnaval
policy made public today by the
Navy department.
The principal change In the
statement, which bore the signature
of Secretary Charles Frances Ad-
ams, from that enunciated in 1928
under Secretary Wilbur was a call
for organization of the navy "as
far as possible so that only expan-
sion will be necessary in the event
of war."
In line with this principle was an
addition to the operating policy
which would provide for operating
"Naval dstricts, yards, stations and
bases for the maintenance of the
fleet and their operation in peace
so that these actiiities can be ex-
panded for war."
Prepare for Emergency.
Industrial mobilization in time of
war was contemplated under anoth-
er new provision. This said a part
of the policy was "to determine
emergency materialneeds; to plan
for their procurement and1 to co-
ordinate these plans with those of
the War Department."
It was described as fundamental
that "the Navy should be main-
tained in sufficient strength to sup-
port the national policies in com-
merce, and to guard the continental
and over-seas possessions of the
United States."
It repeated the statement from
the previous policy that it was the
intention to "create, maintain and
operate a Navy second to none and
In conformity with treaty provi-
sions," changing the phraseology to
provide for conformance to the
London treaty as well as the Wash-
ington agreement.
Would Build to Limit.
Whereas the cruiser building pol-
icy of two years ago definitely de-
clared against building any more
small cruisers, the new statement
specified simply that it was the in-
tention "to build and maintain
cruiser tonnage as allowed by treaty
provisions."
The scope of the heavier-than-
air policy was considerably enlarged
to provide for operating airplanes
"from air-craft carrier, battleships,
cruisers and with marine expedi-
tionary forces to their full author-
ised complement" for developing
the types of airplanes best suited
for "increasing the effectiveness of
naval vessels, destructive attacks on
all classes of naval objectives, and
for scouting and patrol."

War Secretary to Make Philippine Survey

Patrick J. Hurley (left), Secretary of War, is shown here with
Manuel Quezon, leader of the Philippine senate, with whom it is be-
lieved he has been conferring on the question of Philippine independ-
ence. Speculation is rife at Washington as to the significance of Secre-
tary Hurley's visit to the islands, during which he will study their status
on behalf of President Hoover.

CENSUS INDICATES
CAIN FOR NEGROES
Slight Decline in White Growth
Rate Shown in Government's
Racial Classification.
WASHINGTON, Aug. 4.-(/P)--
Racial classiffication of the Unitedl
States population was announced
today by the Census Bureau, show-
ing marked gain in Negro growth
rate and a slight loss in White
growth rate.
Duringthe last decade, the Ne-
groes increased by 13.6 per cent
as compared with 6.5 per cent in
the 10 years previous. The White
race increased 14.8 per cent as com-
pared with 16 per cent the decade
before.
Even when adjustment was made
for the approximately 700,000 Mexi-
can population counted as "white"
in 1920, the percentage of increase
for the white population was but
15.7 per cent in 1930.
Blames Lower Birth Rate.
The Census Bureau said the
white decline obviously was due to
the falling of the birth rate and the
restriction of immigration.
Nearly two-thirds of the entire
Negro increase took place in the
north, and the census bureau as-
sumed that large numbers of south-
ern negroes migrated northward.
However, the negroes in the south-
ern states increased by five per
cent.
Georgia, only state with more
than a million Negroes in 1920 de-
creased by 11.2 per cent, and Vir-
ginia and South Carolina also lost.
Mississippi gained by 8 per cent
and became second state with more
than a million Negro population-
1,009,718.
Negroes Gain in East.
New York state gained by 108 per
cent, making-the Negro population
412,814; New Jersey by 78.3 per cent
to 208,828; Pennsylvania by 51.5 per
,cent, to 431, 257.
Highest in percentage of Negro
gain was Michigan, 182 per cent,
with a present Negro population of
169,453. Illinois, gaining 80 per cent,
now has 328,972 Negroes; Ohio with
66.1 per cent has 309,304.
Because of the growing import-
ance of the Mexican population, the
Census Bureau said, it was given a
separate classification for 1930.

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BIDS TO BE TAKEN
ON MUSCLE SHOALS
Commission Will Try to Lease
Properties in Interests
of Agriculture.
FLORENC7, Ala., Aug. 4.-(JP)--
The Muscle Shoals commission will
receive proposals in Washington,
Sept. 1, for lease and operation of
Muscle Shoals "in the interest of
fertilizer production and of agri-
culture."
Chairman Sam F. Hobbs, of
Selma, Ala., made the announce-
ment following the commission's
organization meeting. Simultane-
ously Edward A. O'Neal, president
of the American Farm Bureau Fed-
eration, announced his organization
would submit a bid for lease of the
entire Muscle Shoals project.
General policies with reference to
disposition of the $150,000,000
nitrate plant and hydro-electric
development were discussed by the
commission at its meeting here.
In his announcement, Chairman
Hobbs said:
"The Muscle Shoals Commission
appointed by the President and the
legislature of Tennessee and the
governor of Alabama will on Sept.
1, 1931, at 10 a.m., receive at 1734
New York avenue, Washington,
D. C., proposals in writing for the
leasing and operation of the Muscle
Shoals propect to be operated in the
interests of fertilizer production and
of agriculture . . . together with
any proposals that any concern
desires to make with regard to pro-
jects up river above Muscle Shoals,
or the benefits to be derived there-
from by the Muscle Shoals project
.with a view to submitting such
,proposals to the President of the
United States and to Congress.. ."

Sports woman

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_ES 0 C I E T Y
Residents of Helen Newberry will
act as hostesses to the women who
reside in Mosher--Jordan halls on
Saturday afternoon. Tea will be
served from 4 until 5 o'clock, and
the affair will be informal, having
as its purpose to acquaint the two
groups with each other.
The afternoon tea to be held at
Mosher-Jordan halls tomorrow
from 4 until 5:30 o'clock will be
given for the faculty, although
students on campus will also be
welcomed. There will be an hour
of social dancing also. Members
of the faculty have been invited by
the girls who are students in their
classes.
League to Give Final
Dancing Party Friday
Concluding its social program for
the summer, the Women's League
is holding an informal party for all
faculty and students of the Uni-
versity Friday night in the League
building. Katherine O'Hearn, pres-
ident of the League, and Janice
Gillette, social chairman of the
;League, are in charge of the affair.
There will be dancing with Ken-
neth Lundquist's orchestra furnish-
ing the music. A bridge party at
which prizes will be given is sched-
uled for 9:30 o'clock.
Music School Recital
Thursday Is Cancelled
The concert of operatic numbers
by School of Music students, an-
nounced for Thursday night, has
been cancelled, it was stated yes-
terday by Prof. JameshHamilton,
under whose direction the concert
was. to have been given.
WILLIAMETTE COLLEGE-So-
rority rushing rules approved here
recently prohibit conversation with
rushees concerning other houses
and expenditures of money on rush-
ees.

FACULTY MEMBERS
FETED AT LEAGUE
Visiting Professors of Several
Colleges and Departments
Are Entertained.
Faculty of other universities in
the Summer Session here were en-
tertained yesterday afternoon by
the Women's League at the third
of a series of teas given for non-
resident professors. The guests of
honor at the tea were from the
colleges of Medicine, Dentistry,
Engineering and Architecture,
Pharmacy, and the Health Service
staff.
Hostesses at yesterday's tea were
Mrs. Edward H. Kraus, Miss Ethel
McCormick, Miss Katherine Noble,
Mrs. Emil Lorch, Mrs. Edward
Stalker, Mrs. Edward Eriksen, Dr.
Emmeth Schultz, Mrs. C. H. Stock-
ing, Mrs. Lewis McGrain, Miss Gom-
berg, Mrs. F. G. Novy, Mrs. Carl Hu-
ber, Mrs. A. H. White, Mrs. Robert
K. Brown, Mrs. C. V. Weller, Mrs. J.
D. Bruce, Mrs. Theophile Raphael,
Dr. Margaret Bell, Mrs. Harley A.
Haynes, Mrs. F. H. Aldrich, and Mrs.
Arthur C. Curtis.
Students assistants were Kather-
ine O'Hearn, Janice Gillette, Miriam
Heidelberg, Dorothy Pearse, Mary
Colburn, Mildred Buddenhaggen,
Gladys Baker, Erie Weber,
BRIGHT SPOT
802 Packard Street
Today, 11:30 to 1:30
Lamb Stew with Carrots
Peas and Hot Biscuits
S Ice Cream or
Banana, Nut Salad
Fruit Jam Sandwich
Coffee,Milk
t 30c
5:30 to 7:30
Baked Ham, Raisin
or Stuffed Pork Chops
Meat Loaf, Tomato Sauce
Roast Beef, Horseradish
French Fried or Candied Sweet
Potatoes
Cucumbers or String Beans
35c

All matches in the second round
of the tennis tournaments must be
played off this week. This applies
to both the beginners and inter-
mediates, and it is necessary that
the round be completed by Friday
so that the tournament can be fin-
ished before the end of the Summer
Session.
Those wanting to play in the last
open hockey game of the season
are asked to be dressed ready for
play at 7:15 o'clock tonight on Pal-
mer field. Refreshments will be
served after the game in the field
house as usual.
The last outdoor swimming party
of the Summer Session will be held
next Friday afternoon at one of the
nearby lakes. Cars will leave Bar-
bour gymnasium at 5 o'clock and
return about 7:30 o'clock. Those
planning to attend are to sign up
and pay Mary J. Damm before Fri-
day noon. The fee includes trans-
portation and supper.
Ex-Congressman Faces
Criminal Libel Charge
CHICAGO, Aug. 4.-(JP)-Former
Rep. Stanley Kunz (Dem.) was ar-
rested Monday on a warrant charg-
ing him with criminal libel.
The warrant was obtained by
Charles Granata, brother of Rep.
Peter C. Granata (Rep.), who de-
feated Kunz for re-election fron
the Eighth Illinois District.
Charles Granata, who was active
in his brother's campaign, charged
Kunz accused him of having gang
affiliations.
Kunz posted $500 cash bond foi
his appearance in court.

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SPORJSWOR9:s
As a native of Michigan, the writ- to have great possibilities. Wallie
is naturally interested in the Shang and Joe Dugan were picked
te's lone representative in ma- up.
league ball, the Detroit Tigers.
has followed the work of the The team coasted along for
ngals since the days when Cobb, awhile, maintaining a .500 average.
awford and Veach patrolled the Then it slipped, and soon afterward
ter gardens, Dauss was the main- both Gehringer and Alexander were
iy of the hurling corps-in short injured. Since then it has won less
ice the late Hughie Jenning's Ee- than one-third of its games and at
h was the familiar signal for at- the moment is in the cellar, even
;k by the striped cats. with its infield stars back in shape.
The spectacle of the Tigers this The team carried the most potent
ar is the most disheartening in attack in either league a few years
cent history. It is disheartening back, now it is hitting at a .264 clip,
cause the team, figured at the yin seventh place. In fielding it is
art of the campaign as a possible tied with Cleveland for sixth place
ntender for fourth place, has with an average of .963. Only St.
ne a complete somersault, and Louis, fielding at a .961 rate, is
ems to have nothing to recom- farther down. Its leading batter,
end it now-not even fighting Alexander, is in 18th place with a
alities. mark of .322, Stone is second
Stanley Harris was doped to among the Tiger stickers with .304
aild a ball team in three years. and Gehringer third with an even
s first step when he came to De- .300.
lit was to remove the causes of Its hurling, considered weak in
e dissention which kept the team years back, is no stronger now.
wn during the Moriarty regime, Charlie Sullivan is leading with
iefly Harry Heilmann and Harry three games won and one lost, but
ice. He then proceeded to build. the regulars are not faring so well.
is first two years netted him little, Sorrell leads with eight games won
ad he was expected to produce and as many lost, Whitehill has won
is year. Young talent was eight and lost 11, Uhle has put
ought in freely, and, fortified away five and lost 11, and Tommy
ith such veterans as Gehringer, Bridges, the Evansville wizard,
lexander, McManus, Whitehill, crashed through with only five wins
nrall TThla n nvi ,u,.wvmtn ~as dV naaa~1t

Special Purchase
Silk Hosiery
In a 3 Day Sale

Wednesday,

Thursday, Friday Only
This is our No. 555
No Mend we form-
erly sold at
$1.39
Special Price
From Factory
79c
Pair

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$ 750
You can wear these!
have all the new dash
the derby crowns, the
feather trimmings.

"Empress Eugenie"H
Midsummer Ensembles

They're not too extreme, but
... the dip over the right eye,
swing to the brims and smart

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Among the Best and at
Reasonable Prices
FREEMAN'S
DINING ROOM
Lunches 40c, Dinners 60c
Sunday Dinner 75c
ONLY ONE BLOCK NORTH FROM HILL AUDITORIUM

a

a !Service Weight
We made a special purchase from No Mend Hosiery Company and
as a result YOU may save emphatically on these all first quality,
full fashioned, pure silk hosiery! With fine mercerized tops and re-
inforced heels. Cradle soles, neat French heels. All good summer
and Early Fall shades.

Third Floor
Goodyears ,

Annex Store

4O.

124 South Main Street

Telephone 4171

Phone 4161

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