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August 04, 1931 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1931-08-04

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TUESDAY, AUGUST 4, 1931

TEM SUM OR MICMGAN DAILY

P Q=

THE SUMER MIUIGAI. DILY P .E TEk

GREINLANDP ARHTY
ON BOARD 'DISCO'
RAMS INTOICEBERG
Radiogram to Hobbs Describng
Accident Delayed; Ship
10 Days Overdue.
CRASH OCCURED JULY 4

gGI\VING
SPOPXtS Wf
By C. H. Beukema.
EALIZING whati
the effect may be,
Bill Tilden, Vinnyl
Richards and the
rest of the tennis,
experts are reluc-
tant to state deft-
nitely what the
outcome of Henri
Cchet's entry into
the professional
tennis ranks is
likelyto be, so far
as French Davis Cup hopes are con-F
cerned, but behind it all they must
be certain that France is holding
the cup for the last time. Perhaps
they wish to spare the emotions
of the temperamental followers of

Balloon Studies by Southern
Part of Expedition Said
to Be Successful.
Crashing into the side of a huge
iceberg near Umanak, West Green-
land, the motorship "Disco," carry-
ing the northern party of the Uni-
versity Greenland Expedition, ran
up on the ice platform which al-
ways surrounds the visible part of
an iceberg, breaking several of the
upper plates of the ship and de-
stroying the anchor, according to
word received here by radiogram.
The party, under the direction of
William H. Carlson, assisted by Max
Demorest, was returning to the
United States by way of Copenhag-
en, Denmark, and was moving
slowly through the ocean at mid-
night on July 4 when the accident
occurred.
The 60 passengers on board rush-.
ed up on deck, finding that the
"Disco", weighing 1400 tons, was
listing heavily on the iceberg which
was more than twice as high as
the mast.
The radiogram notifying Profes-
sor Hobbs of this calamity was de-
layed until July 28 and no further
word has been received from the
party. He is confident that the ship
is delayed for repairs at some
Greenland port, and although now
fully ten days overdue, will soon
report from Copenhagen.'
According to a letter received
August 3 from the southern part
of the expedition, conducted by'
Evans S. Schmeling, the balloon
studies have been extremely suc-
cessful and the party will leave
Evigtut, South Greenland, the last:
week in August on the freighter,
"Wagland" which will make Phila-
delphia direct in 5 days.l

inr~i~.MADDOYINTRODUCES
the tri-color. National High School Orchestra
It has been suggested, but some- Alumni Admitted for
what lamely that Rene LaCoste, Special Courses.-
hero of Davis Cup play in 1927 and
1928, France's first two winning Dr. Joseph E. Maddy, formerly a
y2,rs y ance h's ctwoewinning member of the School of Music
years, may take Cochet's place, faculty, has introduced a new fea-
Richards has said that it is doubt- ture into the National High Schol
fu if LaCoste, playing the type of Orchestra and Band Camp on Lake
game that he does, can come back. Wa-Be-Ka-Netta, of which he is
But, going beyond that, consider- the founder and director. For the
Butngoingeyond hat consder- first time this summer college stu-
ing LaCoste's physical condition, dents who are alumni of the High
his advance in years, and his ab- School organization are admitted
sence from the game, it seems im- to the camp and are offered special
posible that he should be able to courses; these students have their
match the efforts of Austin or Per- own orchestra and band and give
match hegd eor of Austn or Pher- concerts separately from the young-
ry of England or of Wood or Shields er group. Extension courses for
of the United States. And certain- which University credit is offered
ly, if he cannot do it, there is no in the School of Music are part of
one who can, as Jean Borotra is the camp program.
through. Many distinguished members of
Cochet himself might not have the professional musical world visit
been able to retain the cup next the camp and are guest conductors
year, but right now it is interesting at the camp concerts. John Philip
to know whether his skill will carry Sousa, one of the artists who has
him as far in the professional field visited the camp this summer, re-
as it did in the ranks of the simon cently conducted the orchestra and
pures. band concert in the Interlachen
pe* * * Bowl before two thousand people.
The rumor is abroad that Connie Lieutenant Commander Sousa con-
Mack will wreck his batting front ducted some of his own composi-
after the coming world's series, to ines," s a arch which he dedi-r
give the remaining seven clubs in Gated to the Orchestra camp
the American League a look-in dur-
ing the next few seasons. The fact Important among the influences
that the old war-horse is a fine of this camp is the contact of the
sportsman and is willing to abdi- high school student with University
cate after having built one of the of Michigan students and faculty
finest baseball machines of all and his acquaintance with the ad-
times gives credence to the rumor. vantages offered by the School of
And if the box office side of the Music.

C
i

SportsW oman
For the last time this season, the
women's physical education de-
partment will sponsor an open
hockey meet for all women register-
ed in the summer session.
Although it was originally plan-
ned to have but one of these games,
they proved so popular that they
have been repeated every week. The
department furnishes all of the
necessary equipment and any wom-
an desiring to play may do so by
appearing dressed for the game at
7:15 o'clock tomorrow night on Pal-
mer field.
After each meet, refreshments
are served in the lounge at the field
house.
There is still room for a few more
of the women on campus to enroll
in the open swimming meet to be
held at 7:30 o'clock next Thursday
evening in the Union pool.
The program will include a 25
yard free style, side stroke for
form, racing back stroke for form,
sculling 25 yards, retrieving objects,
novelty races, and a water game.
Those entering must sign up in i
Barbour gymnasium at once.

1l
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"It is the mistaken idea of many
women that they can do more good
for the world by keeping their nos-
es to the grindstones and never
once thinking of their health and
physical well-being," stated Dr.
Margaret Bell, director of physical,
education for women, in discussing
the health of summer school stu-
dents recently.
"This is the reason that many of
the women who come to use are so
prematurely old," she continued.
"They don't seem to realize that
just a little time given to setting up
exercises every morning would ac-
complish much towards giving
them better health and more
strength for doing their work as
well as making them all look young-
er."
"Of course, a great deal of out-
door exercis e is highly desirable
and extremely beneficial," Dr. Bell
went on. "But we realize that many
of these women have not the time
to devote to this and it is for them
particularly that we have prepared
a series of setting up exercises call-
ed "The Michigan Daily Dozen"
which will keep them in trim if
they will just devote a few minutes
to them each morning."
The members of the department
have just completed these exerciss
and will be glad to advise any sum-
More Than 250 Make
Trip to Put-in-Bay
Although the slight rainstorm
last Saturday on Lake Erie spoiled
part of the Pun-in-Bay excursion
for a few of the members, most of
the 251 people who took the trip
had a very enjoyable day.
This is more than twice the num-
ber of people who have attended
previous excursions to Put-in-Bay,
under the auspices of the geology
department, -according to Prof.
William H. Hobbs, who conducted
the trip.

MICHIGAN DAILY DOZEN WILL KEEP
STUDENTS HEALTHY SAYS DR. BELL

"Let's WBk"

r
t.
.fi

mer student about them and give
her the set if she will call at either
Barbour gymnasium or the Health
Service and make an appointment
with either Dr. Bell or Dr. Mable
Rugen, professor of physical educa-
tion for women.
"We are particularly anxious to
help those women who have been
enrolled in the various recreational
courses this summer because we
feel that the work which they are
doing now will be totally lost if
they drop it as soon as summer
school closes and forget their health
entirely until next summer," Dr.
Bell stated. "However, we do not
wish to exclude any other woman
who wishes to consult us about
them."

'w
Oh, well.

lit
U.a

1

THE Neolithic men were un-
questionably a smart people
In the heart of the Umbrella
Age they figured out that
strolling in the rain would be
fun if you only didn't get wet.
Nothing more was done about
it, though, until 1836, when
Tower started making slick-
ers. We're - good at it
now, if we do say it.
Fish Brand Slickers, roomy,
well-cut, long-wearing, are
sold everywhere, in a wide
range of models, weights and
colors, for men and others.
Your slicker will soon pay for
itself in reduced taxi and
pressing bills. Look for the
fish on the label. A. J. Tower
Company, 24 Simmons Street,
Boston, Massachusetts.

picture is to be considered, it is al-
most certain that steps will be Women's League Plans
taken to help some of the weaker Friday Evening Party
clubs' of the circuit.I_ _
Receipts at Shibe park have fal-
len off since the Athletics have Friday night the Women's League
taken to winning 75 per cent of will give their regular Summer Ses-
their games. In fact only the Sena- sion party for faculty and students
tors, winners in the first two games of the University. Entertainment
of their present series, have given will be in the form of bridge and
the Mackmen any trouble. And dancing and prominent faculty
those two losses may have resulted members have accepted invitations
partly from the desire of the A's to attend. There will be no admis-
management to reawaken interest sion charge for the affair but Uni-
in the team. versity identification is necessary
for admission.

p

We have all makes
Remington, Royal,
Corona, Underwood

a
t-

I

Colored duco finishes. Price $60
O. D. MORRILL
314 South State St. Phone 6615

4III3RN$

STEPPI NG

INTO A

r 1 ter. :.

MODERN WORLD

II, I

Neatness
of
Appearance
The greatest factor in the forming of first
impressions is one's personal appearance.
Nothing can detract from this more than a
poorly laundered shirt. The Varsity's com-
plete modern equipment for the ironing of
shirts with just the right amount of starch
a s s u r e s the most satisfactory laundering
possible.
Dial 2-3123
For Call and Deliver Service
THE
A-UNDRY Cp-
Liberty at Fifth
We Use Ivory Soap Exclusively

. ..
1
{
I
f

Scientist and

Salesman

THE MODERN PARTNERSHIP

Like every other modern industry, the Bell
System requires the combined effort of scien-
tist and salesman. The commercial man has
again and again shown the public how to use
new products of the telephone laboratory,
and how to make new uses of existing
apparatus.
Transmitting pictures and typewritten mes-

sages over telephone wires are services right
now being actively promoted. Scientific selling
by long distance is among many ideas origi-
nated to increase the telephone's usefulness.
In short telephony is a business, with prob-
lems that stimulate commercially minded men
and a breadth of opportunity in step with the
fast moving world of industry today.

BELL SYSTEM

I~Omni

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