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August 01, 1931 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1931-08-01

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PACE T9

TAE SII1I+IlV ZR MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, AUGUST 1, 1931

PAGE_. ,.WO___HE SUMMER _.wICHIGA.N DAILY SATURDAY. AUGUST.......... 1 19 x.

rabtsei e ry morning ecept Monday
hi the university Bummer esin by the
goa in Control of Student Publications.
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled
to the use for republication of all news di-
pates credited to it or not otherwise credited
in this paper and the local news published
herein. All rights of republication of special
dispatches herein are also reserved.
Enutered at the Ann Arbor, Michigan, post-
*flee as second class matter.
Subscription by carrier, $1.60; by mail,
$1.78.
Offices: Press Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan.
Telephones: Editorial, 4925; Business
2-1214.
EDITORIAL STAFF
MANAGING EDITOR
HAROLD 0. WARREN, JR.
Editorial Director............Gurney Williams
ASSOCIATE EDITORS
C. W. Carpenter Carl Meloy
.. R. Chiibb Sher M. Quraisli
Barbara Nal Eleanor Rairdon
Susar Manchester Marion Thornton
P. Cutler Showers
BUSINESS STAFF
BUSINESS MANAGER
WILLIAM R. WORBOYS
%sistant Business Manager .. Vernon Bishop
,ontracts Manager.............Carl Marty
c..singManager......... Jack Bunting
n C rculation......... Thomas Muir
N ght Editor-LYLE R. CHUBB
SATURDAY, AUGUST 1, 1931

What Others Say
THE FRIENDLESS
COLLEGE
(New York Times)
Summer lectures continue to find
all manner of fault with the Amer-
ican college. Dr. Clarence C. Lit-
tle, who has been a college and uni-
versity president in two states, crit-
icizes the unintelligent methods of
admission to college; the easy cur-
riculum open to those who are ad-
mitted; the autocracy of the pro-,

EROLL
SUPPRESSION
THREATENS
ROLLS SERIAL
Developments following the pub-
lication yesterday of a question-
naire designed to sound public sen-
timent on the stupendous Rolls Se-
riel indicate that plotters are at-
tempting to prevent any expression
of popular opinion on the matter.
We have evolved this theory after
an interview with Pltsch Whoofle,
who hinted that such was the case.
"Developments following the publi-
cation yesterday of a questionnaire

I

fessional coach; the fraternities designed to sound public sentiment
which he called "splendid centres on the stupendous Rolls Serial in-
of hypocracy"; the education of dicate that plotters are attempting
young men and women in the same to prevent any expression of popu-
institution, and the abuse of auto- lar opinion on the matter," Pltsch
mobiles and liquor by students. declared.
Colleges will be as popular as ever Answers poured in steadily yes-
with youth, no doubt, next Fall, and terday morning after the appear-
parents will be eager to find the ance of the questionnaire, but as
means to give their sons and daugh- soon as we got through reading it,
ters a higher education. Coeduca- there was a sudden lull. After that
tional institutions will still be con- there were no more replies.
sidered as helping more students Statements from prominent read-'
than they have spoiled. As for auto- ers cast no light on the nature of
thrustIthe plot. Following are a few of the
mobiles and liquor, they thutstatements:
themselves into the college campus Joseph A. Shrdlu, dean of
from the social ways of the grown- sents:."Sdntknwany-
ups outside. They are not distinct- stdents:out idon't know any-
ively "college evils," nor are they President Alexander G. Yu-
essentially or exclusively "partners" ion: "We cannot enforce radical

FIRST METHODIS'
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Cor. S. State and E. Washington Sts.
Dr. Frederick B. Fisher. Minister
10:45 A. M.-Morning Worship.
"THE UPWARD LOOK."
Bishop Herbert Welch
of Pittsburgh.
12:00 Noon-Student Bible Class,
Wesley Hall.
6:00 P. M.-Devotional Meeting,,
Wesley Hall. Speaker: George W.
Sample, Judge of the Circuit Court,
FIRST CHURCH
CHRIST, SCIENTIST
409 S. Division St.
10:30 A. M.-Regular Morning
ice. Sermon topic: "Love."
11:45 A. M.-Sunday School follow-
ing the morning service.
7:30 P. M.-Wednesday Evening
testimonial meeting.
The Reading Room, 10 and 11
State Savings Bank Building, is open
daily from 12 to 5 o'clock, except
Sundays and legal holidays.

ST. ANDREW'S
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Division and Catherine Streets
Reverend Henry Lewis, Rector
Reverend Duncan E. Mann, Assistant
8:00 A. M.-Holy Communion.
10:00 A. M.-Brotherhood of St.
Andrew's Bible Class, Harley Kline
leader.
11:00 A. M.-Summer Kindergarten.
Miss Eunice Campbell, director.
11:00 A. M-Holy .Communion,
sermon by the Rev. Henry Lewis,
"Preparation for Holy Commun-
ion.
7:00 P. M.-Sunset service at the
Presbyterian Church house, speak-
er Dr. E. H. C. Oliphant, "Toler.
Tuesday open house at Harris Hall'
from four to six.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL
CHURCH
Allisen Ray Heaps, Minister
Sunday, August 2nd, 1931
10:45 A. M.-Sermon by Mr. Heaps.
"THE RELIGION WE NEED."
Last preaching service until Sept.
13th.
Soloist-
Organist-

FIRST
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Huron and Division Sts.
Merle H. Anderson. Minister
Alfred Lee Klaer, University Pastor
10:45 A. M.-Morning Worship.
Sermon: "Three Young Men."
Alfred Lee Klaer.
6:00 P. M.-Social Hour for Stu-
dent at the Church House.
7:00 P. M.-Union Vesper Service
in the Grove at the Church House,
1432 Washtenaw Avenue. Prof.
Earnest H. C. Oliphant of Sarah
Lawrence College, Bronxville, N.
Y. will speak on "Tolerance and
Complacency."

IL

FIVE BILLION
DOLLARS

THE STORY on page three of this of co-education.
As to the unwise use of leisure,
issue having to do with the what Dr. Little says is true, but it
cost of crime in America presents is also true of the life of tens of mil-
some startling figures. Five to sev- lions who do not go to college. One
en billions of dollars a year for of the chief ends of a college educa-
crime is an almost incredible tion is to prepare men and women
amount; and yet when one reflects for the highest use of leisure. It is
upon the present organized and sys- not a "problem" in the vocational
tematic methods employed by gangs and professional school. The college
and racketeers, it seems quite pos- sometimes seems a friendless insti-
sible that seven billions is more tution, but perhaps those who crit-
nearly correct. Whatever the fig- icize its shortcomings and try to
tire, it is a colossal price to pay for mend them are after all its best
the inefficiency of society, which in- friends.
cludes every phase from home in-
fluences to law enforcement bodies.
Most of the crime can be confined EXECUTIVE'S
to larger cities where opportunities FOOL
for graft and all kinds of easy mon-
ey are numerous,kand it is in these (The New Yorker)
centers that federal forces, work- From our tailor-who seems to
ing with comparatively few men, think of us as an executive- comes
have accomplished more than the a note announcing that he has es-
combined efforts of metropolitan tablished a new group of custom-
police. The swift, sure and uncom- tailored suits called the Executive
promising punishment of crime Group. The enlightening thing
leaders like Al Capone by federal about his letter is his explanation
courts will help a great deal in dis- that the suits are to be priced at
couraging organized crime; but a ridiculously low figure and that
meanwhile, city police forces are it is solely an emergency measure
hampered by ponderous laws and because ordinarily he couldn't pos-
proclivities toward graft that pre- sibly afford to sell such high-qual-
vent wholesale and permanent ity garments at such a low price: he
clean-up campaigns among the les- is doing it to "keep busy during
ser criminals. It is here that social these depressed times." This con-
influences should step in; education vinces us that the only thing busi-
will accomplish many things that nessmen fear, or can't endure, is
threats and violence will never be idleness, and that, regardless of
able to do. It is difficult to imagine whether they are making profit or
an idealized society, created by ed- not, just to be busy is something.
ucation, and free from crime, but it To make him envious we dispatched
is nex ertheless true that organized a note back, saying that we our-
crime could not breed in an en- self were so rushed we couldn't even
vironment controlled by suitable spare time to buy a suit of clothes
social influences and protected by -even a suit designed to make us
simple but effective laws. look like an executive, instead of
Parental control seems a small (as is really the case) an executive's
item in the vast multitude of crime fool.
causes but its importance cannot
be over-emphasized. Probate Judge
H. A. Snyder of Cadillac recently ..
stated that "when Dad tore down Campus Opinion
the woodshed to build a garage he Contributors are asked to be brief,
was furnishing transportation to confining themselves to less than 300
thepeitntiryfo hs on onin words if possible. Anonymous com-
the penitentiary for his own son in munications will be disregarded. The
many cases." It sounds far-fetched names of communicants will, however,
be regarded as confidential, upon re-
but there are thousands of cases to quest. Letters published should not be
construed as expressing the editorial
confirm his statement. To mention opinioi of The Daily.
a recent one: fifteen-year-old Vin-
cent Corry has just been sent to
serve an eighteen-year stretch at MISLEADING
Joliet for slaying a policeman with A RTICLE
a gun that the boy's parents knew
their son was carrying. A criminal To The Editor:
nipped in the bud-but at the cost The Washtenaw County Civic
of his whole career. League takes issue with you on
Perhaps the day will come when your editorial this morning. Your
public sentiment will become so first citation is a case of a rum-
strong against organized crime that runner in Nova Scotia; the next is
the masses will rise up and strike. a bootlegger in Indiana and the
Perhaps a time will come when the third, some racketeers in New York.
public will realize that crime costs You then lay the entire blame for
every American citizen in the these and all racketeering to Pro-
neighborhood of fifty dollars a year. hibition and say that "The major-
Perhaps we may see the day when ity of Americans regard Prohibi-
ponderous public opinion will be- tion as a joke, and its enforcement
come so insistent that crime will be virtually impossible."
crushed by an avalanche of action. It is just such articles as this that
Perhaps-but there is not much in- help break down the laws of the
dication of it at present. People country.
would rather pay the five or seven While it is true that in many of
billions and "mind their own busi- our large cities, the officials have
ness." made little effort to enforce this
! law, conditions are vastly better
Sir Hubert Wilkins is still strug- than in saloon days. This law is be-
gling to get the "Nautilus" to the ing better enforced every year; Ann
North Pole. At his present rate of Arbor is an example of that.
progress we predict that he will be The metropolitan press is wet and
met there by a brass band and the organizations against Prohibi-
blasts from North Pole factory tion are paying to have much of
whistles. their propaganda published in these
papers. That does not represent the
The new profile "Derby" hats that majority, however.-
stylists are forcing on women is Attorney General Mitchell says

measures upon an unwilling
public. Controlled experimen-
tation is the only solution."
Dean Edward H. Zxcvbkq:
"School of Education, 774, en-
gineering college, 227, Gradu-
ate school, 2,093."
Police Chief O'Brien: "I nev-
er heard of him."
The Ann Arbor Daily Etaoin:
"Perhaps, but on the other
I hand ....."
JoeGluch, '33: "I never read
the books column. Gorman's
too highbrow for me."
Ann Arbor Tr*b*ne: "He who
looks after his wife and his
house has enough to do.-French
Proverb."
* * *
You can see pretty well that the
plot against the great Rolls Serial
is getting out of our control. May-
be we shouldn't have said anything
about it.
r* r
A record crowd took the Rolls Ex-
cursion to Lake Whoofle, in the
back yard of Natural Science audi-
torium, yesterday. He didn't have
very much fun, but thought the
trip highly educational.
- -
* * *
Record Crowd.
We picked up the following
little gem in a local morning
tri-weekly: "Would you call a
dog? Then speak of the nurse-
ry as they do not carry a stick.
-African Proverb."
It takes the new blood of the
African to think up something in-
genious like that. Think what a
pleasure it will be to say to the
children: "Go to the do not carry a
stick."
The final vote on our Stupen-
dous Rolls just came in. The totals
are as follows:
Tropical Adventure, 0; Mys-
tery Stuff, 0; Great Northwest,
0; Mad, Mad Youth, 0; Futur-
istic, 0; The Hell With It, 1
We don't like the results any bet-
ter than you do, but the United
States is a republic, and the ma-
jority must rule here just as it
does in the United States. So here
it is:
To Be Continued)
eering of the country. Your edi-
torial and many like it in the wet
press, would lead to infer that all
racketeering and practically all law
violation is due to Prohibition in
the United States; you even include
Nova Scotia.
If those who write for the Press
would encourage Loyalty to our
Government, instead of writing
misleading articles in opposition to
this law, it would be far better en-
forced.
C. W. Melick, Secretary.
The Washtenaw County Civ-
ic League.
(With all due respect to Secre-
tary Melick, The Editor wishes to
point out that yesterday's editorial
embraced no criminal incident that
was not directly caused by Prohibi-
tion; that the editorial did not
blame all crime on Prohibition; and
that The Daily will never urge loy-

TiE
FIRST BAPTIST (IURCH
E. Huron, below State
R. Edward Sayles, Minister
Howard R. Chapman, Minister for
Students.
9:30 A. M.-The Church School.
10:45 A. M.-Morning Worship
conducted by Rev. A. R. Chapman.
12:00 N.-Student and friends meet
for 35 minutes in west transept of
the church.
7:00 P. M.-Union Service on
Presbyterian Church House lawn
at 1432 Washtenaw Avenue.

1' 1

I' 11

I

Ti LONG, LEAN
HAND OF FASHION
O
Like Fu Chow How's hairy hand, it vi-
ciously clutched our k1;roats-demanding
that collars be piane l We impaled our
Adam's apples. We felt as a bull must
feel, receiving tine aatador's thrust. The
fronts of our shirts sh;wed crimson. We
reviled and rebelled, but relentless fashion
insisted on fastened collars. Then came
Swank! It looks like a pin, but isn't. You
slip Swank on and slip it offrwithout sword-
play and blood. The long, lean hand
of fashion is long and lean no longer--but
rather like a pale hand that is loved be-
side the Shalimar. Get a Swank today.
Keep your collar neat and trim. Gold-
filled or solid gold. Plain, f.ancy and sport
designs in various lengths. Jewelers' or
men's shops. 50 cents to $10.
SA N K
LOOKS LIKE A PIN-BUT ISN'T
4 tv d.ae ar & Wilde Co., Makers of
* -a ' C uff Buttons and Carlton Auto.
', ghters . . . Attleboro, Mass.
Fu
to EUROPE
Merry-making never gets a minute off in the IMM
Tourist third cabin. The crowd, food and accom-
modationsareright, but the price seems all wrong
-it"s almost too low for such a marvelous voyage.
In 1930 the record number of 60,522 passengers
traveled in IMM Tourist."
$105 up
NO CLASS DISTINCTIONS on the Tourist
third cabin liners de luxe. Penniand and Western-
land. Their entire former cabin accommodations
are devoted exclusively to Tourist. The only
steamers of their kind in the world.
Also delightful Tourist third cabin accommoda-
tions on the Maientic, world's largest ship. OlYmpic,
Homeric, Selgenland, Britannic and many others.
Several weekly sailings to principal European
ports and British Isles.
Send for literature describing Tourist 3rd cabin.
No. 1 Broadway, New York City,
Dlgby 4-5800, or authorized agents.
WHITE STAR - RED STAR
AT[ANITIC' TDA SDE'hDT.

ONE SUMMER DAY
Affords ample time for a delightful 120-mile
round trip cruise on Detroit river and
Lake Erie from Detroit to
PUT-IN-BAY ISLAND PARK
Scene of the Battle of Lake Erie. Golf, bathing, boating,
fishing, picnic in the grove or dine at the fine hotels. Perry
Victory monument and wonderful caves.
FOR THE ROUND TRIP. CHILDREN
75c W3EKnAYS. $1.25 and 65c SUNDAYS.40
Return same day
8tr. Puit-Bay leaves foot of First St., Detroit, daily, 9 a.m. Home at 8
p.m., except Fri.,10.:15 p.m., or Pt-In-Bay, Cedar Point and Sandusky,O.
$7 A BARGAIN TWO-DAY OUTING $7
The Crescent Hotel Company and Ashley & Dustin
StamerLinehave joined tooffertheextremelylowrate of$7foratwo-day
outing atPut-In-Bay. Leave Detroit any day at 9a.m., arrive 19 oon.Lunch
at Crescent Hotel, also evening dinner and room; breakfast and dinner
the next day. Round trip on steamer and dinner on the boat remnk~
CEDAR POINT
The Lido et America. Special excurions every Friday with over the
hours at the Point, $1.-0 round trip; other days one hour stopover, Tara
$145 roun trip, Cedar Pointor Sandusky. Return same day
DANCING MOONLIGHTS
Leaew Detroit 8S pm. NWednesday - Thursday, 6c.
Home 1:30 p.m. Saturday, Sunday, 75c.
T"fL .I Finzel's Snappy Band.

ASHLEY & DUSTIN STEAMER LINE
Poat of First Street Detroit, Michigan

after the prom

The most popular ready-
to-eat -cereals served in
the dining-rooms of
American colleges, eat-
ing clubs and fraterni-
ties are made by Kellogg
in Battle Creek. They in-
clude ALL-BRAN, Corn
Flakes, Rice Krispies,
Wheat Krumbles and
Kellogg's WHOLE WHEAT
Biscuit. Also Kaffee Hag
Coffee - the coffee that
lets you sleep.

AS A late-in-the-evening snack,
Kellogg's PEP Bran Flakes are
a wonderful dish. Here's favor
that every ,one loves-the
famous flavor of PEP. Here's
whole wheat for nourishment
- the goodness of the whole
grain. And there's just enough
extra bran to be mildly laxative
-to help keep you feeling fit.
Enjoy these better bran
flakes often-for breakfast, for
lunch. You'll never tire of their
wonderful flavor.
Made by Kellogg in Battle
Creek. In the red - and - green
package.
1 RA FAEP
BRAN FLAKE-

r
l
'
"';'

PEP
mNRAKEuS
NM MA

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