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July 31, 1931 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1931-07-31

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TIE SUMMER M OMGAN DAILY

F'RMAY, JULY 31, 1931

Immunw

r

sR r loan ai1u
Pr tshee ery morning except Monday
:::1:e anirerslt1 Summer ssion by the
eeardgin ontrl oStudent Publications.
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled
to the use for republication of all news dis|
V tes credited to it or not otherwise credited
this paper and the local news published
heroin. All rights of republication of special
dispatches here are also reserved.
Enteredat the Ann Arbor, Michigan, post
office as second class matter.
Subscription by carrier, $1.50; by mail,
$1.75.
Offices: Press Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan.
Telephones: Editorial, 4925; Business
2-1214.
EDITORIAL STAFF
MANAGING EDITOR
HAROLD 0. WARREN, JR.
Editorial Director .........Gurney Williams
ASSOCIATE EDITORS
C. W. Oarpenter Carl Meloy
i. R. Chu bb Sher M. QuraisMi
harbara Hall Eleanor Rairdon
Susar Manchester Marion Thornton
P. Cutler Showers
BUSINESS STAFF
BUSINESS MANAGER
WILLIAM R. WORBOYS
Assistant Business Manager . Vernon Bishop
Contracts Manager. ....... eCarl Marty
Advertising Manager. .....Jack Bunting
Accounts. Circulation ........ Thomas Muir
Night Editor-GURNEY WILLIAMS
FRIDAY, JULY 31, 1931

TWISTING
THE THORN

What Others Say
OVERCROWDED
PROFESSIONS
(New York Times)
Mass production of chemists, law-
yers, doctors, dentists, architects,
nurses, veterinarians and half a doz-
en kinds of engineers has resulted1
in a haphazard relationship be-
tween supply and demand in the
"practical professions." The coun-
try needs all the first-class men it
can get in any of them, but has
more mediocrities than it can use,
especially since they are not well i
distributed. Mr. T. Swann Harding,
in the August Current History, sets
forth facts in the professions and
the conditions they and those they
serve are facing. He has no pana-
cea to suggest, but thinks it might
help the young men about to be-1
gin the study of medicine or law if
they could find out what their
chances of success are.
When times were normal or bet-
ter the New York Chemists' Club
warned young men "with university
degrees and impressive experience"
that it was useless to list their
names because there were so many?
more chemists than positions open.
Now the list of names has length-
ened and the list of openings
shrunk. Turning to the law, we find
the number of requests for admis-
sion to the New York bar enor-
mously increased in the last ten
years. An army of a million and a
half caring for the health of the
nation has not kept us from tooth-
ache or tuberculosis. Crowds of doc-
tors and dentists in certain centers,
and deplorable lack of medical fa-
cilities in other sections, keep the
practitioners poor and the populace
ailing. Architects are badly located.
Last April 800 architectural drafts-
men were out of work and 500 of
them were destitute. Good engi-
neers of all kinds are in demand,
but there is a surplus of those with
only ordinary talent or training.
Unless a student has un-
mistakable talent and enthusi-I
asm for one of the "overcrowded
professions," he should consult the
director of vocational guidance of
his university before taking the
plunge. There is just one definite
shortage, and that is among gradu-
ates of veterinary schools.
Campus Opinion
Contributors are asked to be brief,
confining themselves to less than 300
words if possible. Anonymous com-
munications will be disregarded. The
names of communicants will, however,
be regarded as confidential, upon re-
quest. Letters published should not be
construed as expressing the editorial
opinion of The Daily.

I N Nova Scotia a rumrunner uses
gas in escaping coast guards; in
Indiana a bootlegger shoots two
federal dry agents; and now in New
York, beer racketeers shoot down
five innocent children in their
"museling in" feud. Part of the
Vfel's toll of prohibition-the thorn
in our sides. There is nothing hu-
maorous about the incidents them-
Lclves but it is the whole situation
per se which gives rise to a loud
hollow and mirthless horse-laugh
from those of us who have watched
the : 13-year bungle of "enforce-
ment."
Following the Harlem shooting
last Tuesday, New York Police Com-
missioner Mulrooney immediately
dispatched a dozen detectives with
orders to round up every beer rack-
eteer in the city. He did the only
thing he could do, with conditions
the way they are, but the uncon-
scious humor of the situation is an
apt illustration of the country's
greatest farce. The New York Po-
lice know who the b.eer racketeers
are but they let them alone until
someone is shot down and killed;
then there is a great scurry and
bustle, a spasmodic session of cut
and dried investigation; and final-*
ly everything quiets down and the
boys (not the police) go back to
their beer-running. What else can
be expected, when a vast majority
of American citizens regard prohi-
bition as a joke and its enforcement
virtually impossible?
Very wearily we ask the same old
unoriginal question How longisthe
burlesque to continue to deplete
government funds, provide a breed-
ing opportunity for gangs and
turn every second citizen into a
technical law-breaker?

About Books
The Poetry of Wallace Stevens
HARMONIUM: by Wallace Stev-
ens: Alfred A. Knopf: Reprint
1931.
Even when this, his first and only
book of verse, appeared in 1923 Wal-
lace Stevens was considered in the
little review circles one of the few
"certainties" in contemporary
American poetry. The apparent
demand which has necessitated this
reprint (a rare demand made on
good modern poetry) may mean
that a rather larger circle is think-
ing so.
Gorham Munson has suggested
that the poet of this volume is a
dandy. The perception was rather
neat. Stevens is certainly a dandy.
The dandyism is so faultless and
pure it's whimsical. But because
he is keen, subtle, wary, Stevens
is whimsical with quite a difference.
He is very sophisticatedly whimsi-
cal. Because he is wise, he can be
fastidiously whimsical; that is, he
can be aware of his whimsicality.
Being aware of it, he can nurse it
and exploit it. And what is more
important, he can seek safety and
comfort in it.
Wallace Stevens is one of the
most ingenious "escape" poets in
the contemporary scene. Ingeni-
ous, because he nearly faces his ex-
perience; at least one nearly be-
lieves that he has. The escape
comes only in the fact of his mono-
cle-which so dictatorially deter-
mines the -way he faces it that in
effect he is turning away. He is
able to get into his poems a mini-
mum of presentation and resolu-
tion of his experience. But the es-
sential qualities of his poems are
the poetic equivalents of the quali-
ties of his unrumpled, neatly placid
"dandy" attitude. Te prevent the
"torments of confusion" from rum-
pling his attitude, Stevens deliber-
ately delimits his attention to a
connoiseur's interest in the par-
ticular elements which taken to-.
gether might mean confusion. He
deliberately refuses to relate things,
objects, events, etc. (and in this,
his connection with the Imagist
movement is obvious). Confusion
only grows out of relations. In
fastidious attention to particulars,
out of relation, there may be a
satisfying pleasure and comfort.
The whole attitude is a quite
plausible way of living; not at all
unrespectable or unintelligent in an
age when nearly all attempts at re-
lating seem to lead to chaos.
But the resulting poetic product
is not quite as plausible in its
sphere as is the determining atti-
tude in its sphere. To realize the
poetic equivalent of his fastidious-
ness Stevens had to develop one of
the most deft, intricate techniques
in contemporary poetry. Poetical-
ly, Stevens asserts his fastidious-
whimsicality by the establishment
of a "super-sophisticated township
of the mind," a township:
where: "the Lord feels a subtle
quiver" at a young maiden's
prayer, "that was not heaven-
ly love"
where: death is conceived as a
fastidious march of the
worms to heaven's gate, car-
rying limb by limb in their
bellies
where: "Victoria Clemintina, ne-
gress took seven white dogs

to ride in a cab."~
where: "the hair of my blonde is
dazzling, as the spittle of
cows threading the wind."
where: "an inchling bristles in
these pines. bristles, and
points their Appalachian
tangs, and fears not portly
Azcan nor his hoos."
where: "a parakeet of parakeets'
prevails a pip of life amid a
mort of tails."
A calculating technique is clear-
ly necessary to poetically locate and
qualify this sort of township. Stev-
ens has that technique. With
something of Miss Sitwell's her-
metic art (her bewitching toying
with the senses and her talent for
tantalizing sound) Stevens achieves
charming vignettes. With nearly
impeccable craftsmanship (which
is for a long time, in reading him,
interesting for itself) he has creat-
ed a delicious idiom.
But ultimately, I think, his poet-
ry will be somewhat repudiated for
its deliciousness. One ultimately
has to think of Stevens as an ex-
tremely talented poet who writes
delightful readable luxuries. It is
quite probable that the integration
he personally achieves by his "dis-
tortions with strange malice" is val-
uable to himself. But for the read-
er his poems don't seem to yield
a significant integration. Their ap-
peal is almost purely decorative.
Steven's method of externalizing
his dandy attitudes was not a d..

TAsrED ROLL
NO RESULTS,
TO SPEAK
OF
At this writing, our appeal yes-
terday for the public's wishes on our
Mammoth Serial has fallen pretty
flat. We asked what sort of story
would be nicest, and right now,
"Futuristic" is leading by a large
majority named Joe Mfwyp.
* * *
BUT, rather than disappoint any-
one, we'll wait one day longer. Just
fill in the enclosed ballot and mail
it to TOASTED ROLLS, Toasted
Rolls Bldg., Maynard Street.
* * C
BALLOT
Signify by markng X below,
which way you want Rolls'
Mammoth serial to go:
Tropical Adventure ..........
Mystery Stuff ...............
Great Northwest ............
Mad, Mad Youth ............
Futuristic ....................
The Hell With It ............
* * *
TODAY IS THE BIG DAY
What you have been waiting for
is here today-Rolls' Excursion to
Lake Whoofie. Just assemble in
front of Angell hall at 1:30 o'clock
-you may be the only one there,
but don't let that get you down.
There will be no guides (one of the
purposes of this tour is to teach
our students self-reliance and in-
itiative)-just start off promptly,
B
A
Map of Campus
following the map from Angell hall
(A) to Natural Science building's
back yard (B).
There you are, then; take a good
look at the lake and its rowboat,
and return to Ann Arbor at 7:30
o'clock, tired but happy. If you're
not happy, you can come up and
tell us about it. But we won't be
here.
* * *
TESTIMONIAL
"I took your art lessons yesterday,"
says Zilch Whoofie, Racine, Wis.,
"and am vastly pleased. I have since.

MAJESTIC
TODAY
John Barrymore
"SVENGALI"
SATURDAY
SHOCKFD!.
' . . . Even a night nurse
who has seen EVERY-
THING gets the shock of her
lifetime on THIS night
watch !

w.

TYPEWRITING
MIMEOGRAPHING
and
A speciality for twenty
years.
Prompt service . . . Experienced oper-
ators . . . Moderate rates.
O. D. MORRILL
314 South State St. Phone 6615
ai

A.

-tiV

THE UMM~R MCHIAN AILYFRIAYJULY31,193

I
I
I

CARTTER'S
E A
SCENTN
T D
15 CENTS

1

..
A

11

r

- 0--

HAPPY
LANDINGS

T EMPORARILY held up by a de-
feet in their radio set, the Lind-
berghs have at last begun their
long hop to the Orient. It may be
true, as officers of the Canadian
Royal Force maintain, that Lind-
bergh has chosen a hazardous
course over the northern part of
Canada in preference to a safer
course of equal length, but some-
how our faith in Lindbergh's ability
as a navigator cannot be shaken by
such pessimistic murmurings. Ever
since May, 1927, when the Lone
Eagle made the first solo flight to
Le Bourget, Paris, we've never for
a moment doubted his judgment in
areonautics. After four years in the
spotlight as the ideal aviator in
whose hands lies, to a great de-
gree, the success of commercial air
travel, Lindbergh must feel his re-
sponsibility; and now, with his wife
as a passenger-co-pilot, in fact-it
is hardly to be supposed that Lind-
bergh did not carefully consider all
possible dangers of the itinerary he
mapped out for the long flight west-
ward.
At any rate, we wish the Lind-
berghs a swift, safe journey and
happy landings-not only for their
own sakes but because the continu-
ance of public confidence in air
travel depends considerably on the
success of every flight the Lnd-
berghs set out to accomplish. Cer-
tainly they have everything in their
favor: scientific apparatus, scien-
tific knowledge, the greatest of skill
-and the best wishes of millions of

7
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1

OUR WARRING
MINERS
To the Editor :
In an editorial comment you re-
ferred to the unrest in the bitu-
minous coal fields as "civil war." To
most of us who must judge by news-
paper reports, this is a startling
assertion. Last week I had the op-
portunity of interviewing an old
Kentucky resident who was in Ann
Arbor. "This country is now wit-
nessing the start of civil war," he
declared. In 60 years he had never
seen such turmoil at the mines.
In the east of the state the gover-
nor, has sent the state militia to
guard the mines of the big Repub-
lican operators, but the small own-
ers in the west are mostly Demo-
crats and have to hire Burns de-
tectives. He further stated that the
miners are disarming the police
forces and are amassing a supply of
arms and ammunition. A guard
steps out to light a search-light and
is shot by a sniper in the hills. A
"scab" gets to work for a few days
and is kidnapped.
The miners are determined to
fight for their organization, to fight
hunger and starvation. For months
and -for years the miners have not
seen actual dollars. They are forced
to live miserably in Company
homes, to buy at high-price Com-
pany stores. Such purchases are
deducted from the miner's pay and
when he goes to get his pay slip
it generally shows a balance against
him. The miners are suffering,j
their children starving, their ba-

* * * I
Now we'll turn you over to Mr.!
Gorman.
PLTSCH WHOOFLE,

Zilch Whoofle
becamera nationallyet
commercial artist. Let
work go on."

recognized
the good

-who feels as sorry as you.

One lovely woman among men of
the night!
Nurse
with
BEEN LYON
JOAN BLONDELL
CLARKE CARLE
A L LAN L A N
Also

but was rather based too exclusive-
ly on Steven's very personal talent
for bizarre sensations. His wierd
world, described in buffonlike sig-
nificance for the reader.
The integrity of the early T.S.!
Eliot's attitudes and mode of speech
stand out in contrast to Stevens'
work. There is clearly a close rela-
tionship between Stevens' dandy-
ism and Eliot's LaForgueanism. But
wit and irony proved a more sig-
nificant poetic focus than did fas-
tidiousness about sensations.
Through wit and irony, real atti-
tudes towards presented experi-
ence proved posible. Stevens' fastid-
iousness ultimately shows up as an
escape, with little meaning. Eliot's
attitude never denied or distorted
his experience. Stevens struck an
attitud of self-defence and trans-
lated the qualities of that attitude
into poetic terms. The nature of
the experience which necessitated
the self-defense seldom comes
through; as it always does in Eliot.
So that Stevens, as he appears in
his poetry, is almost a dandy in
vacuo.
That Stevens himself is not un-,
conscious of what has been said l
here, there is the evidence of the
poem "The Weeping Burgher,"
where is said in part:
"It is with strange malice
That I distort the world."
and
"Permit that if as ghost I
come
Among the people burning in
me still,
I come as belle design

HEARST NEWS
"THE SALESMAN"

NMI4ICH1IGAN'
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Twain Shall*
Meet"
With
CONCHITA MONTENEGRO
LESLIE HOWARD
C. AUBREY SMITH
Peter B. Kynes immortal
love story of the South Seas.
Directed by
W. S. VAN DYNE
the man who made
"TRADER HORN"
"PARTNERS"
Comedy Act
"NIGHT CLUB
REVELS"
Musical Revue
PARAMOUNT NEWS
SUNDAY
ED. G. ROBINSON
JAMES CAGNEY
in
"SMART MONEY"

WEDNESDAY -
KAY FRANCIS
"Transgression"

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Large Selection of Easel Frames
NO APPOINTMENTS NECESSARY
Annex Store-Phone 4161

bies need milk. The Miner's Relief:
is attempting to shelter them and:
their families in tent colonies and;
are securing food and clothes from!
all parts of the country.
The miners are marching, de-t
manding relief. They are being mett
by armed forces of the operators,
answer to your editorial query is.
and the state. The war is on. AnX
Imperative. What is the UnitedE
States going to do in the face of so.:

i

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