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July 26, 1931 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1931-07-26

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PAt L 3 VM J

TSE SUMA ER MICISIGAN DAILX

SUNDAY, JULY 26, 1931

PAETaTESMERMCIA AL

--- I

t r ummr
U ljw uw tt i
Pulish." every morning except Monday
durin the Jiversity Summer Session by the
Board in ontrol of Student Publications.-
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled
to the use for republication of all news dis-r
patches credited to it or not otherwise credited
in this paper and the local news published
herein. All rights of republication of special
dispatches herein are also reserved. l
Entered at the Ann Arbor, Michigan, post-.
office as second class matter.
Subscription by carrier, $1.60; by mail,
$1.76.
Offices: Press Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan.
Telephones: Editorial, 4925; Business'
1214.
EDITORIAL STAFF
MANAGING EDITOR
HAROLD O. WARREN, JR.
Editorial Director ....... , ..Gurney Williams
ASSOCIATE EDITORS
C. W. Carpenter Carl Meloy
[,. R. Chubb Sher M. Quraishi
Barbara Hal Fe"leanor Rairdon
Charles C. Irwin Edgar Racine
Susan Manchester Mtlarion Thornton
P. Cutler Showrers

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BUSINESS STAFF
BUSINESS MANAGER
WILLIAM R: WORBOYS
ssistant Business Manager .. Vernon Bishop
'ontracts Manager............. Carl Marty
Ltid ertsing Manager ... .....Jack Bunting
"caunt C r!u ao............hoas Muir
N ght Editor-LYLE R. CHUBB
SUNDAY, JULY 26, 1931

G00D PSYCHOLOGY
Thursday's Bargain Day was good
psychology and Ann Arbor mer-
hants must have known it. Results
howed that people have money
end will spend it when properly ap-
proached. In spite of tons of pub-
ment will be left free to help itself
.cute emergency; that they all
money kept in the sock is the prop-
er procedure in times of depression.
Bargain Day reminded us of war
ays when pretty girls climbed a
rung in a fire ladder every time
someone in the crowd bought a
Liberty Bond, but human nature
being what it is, such methods have
their good points. Ann Arbor ought
to have Bargain Days frequently
from now on until people begin to
realize that normal and sensible
buying will not land them in the
poor-house. The depression will
never end if the nation's purse-
strings are to remain permanently
tied.
-0-..
0ARELESSNESS
Someone at the League permit-
ted a lighted cigarette to drop be-
tween two cushions of a red lounge
Thursday night and the resulting
fire destroyed enough of the up-
holstery to ruin the appearance of
a fine piece of furniture. The per-
son responsible for this example of
thoughtlessness may have been a'
member of the University, may have
been a citizen of Ann Arbor at-
tending the theatre, but his or her
carelessness is a matter to be pon-
dered by all persons who attend
the Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre or
enjoy the other privileges of the
League. Smoking in all campus
buildings was banned because of
great fire hazard due to careless-
ness. Let's not give the League just
cause for following the example of
the University in taking away our
privilege to smoke in the building.
---o-
IThat Others Say

OASTED ROLL
HERE
WE ARE
AGAIN

WHAT'S

GOING ON

Only once before in the his- '
tory of our justly far-famed
University and of the Daily, and {
quite incidentally of that miser-
ably ineffective stepchild for
which it happens that we are
doing this cplumn, the Summer
Michigan Daily, has need aris-
en for a campaign quite as ur-
gent as the one we are about
to propose.
* * .*
Back in the dim ante-deluvian
days when Michigan was a UNI-
VERSITY, Dan Baxter once launch-
ed a campaign that WAS a cam-
paign. So, we repeat, Mr. Baxter's
campaign, known from the rugged
crags of the New England coast to
the sunkissed shores of California's,

Theatres.
Majestic "The Lawyers Secret,"
with Clive Brooks, Charles Rogers,
and Fay Wray. Also Andy Clyde,
Talkartoon.
Michigan "Man in Possession,"
with Robert Montgomery.
Wuerth: "'Hell Bound" with Leo
Carillo.
General
Concert at 4:15 o'clock in Hill
auditorium.
Churches. All churches will hold
services at the usual times. At 7
o'clock at the Presbyterian church
house on Washtenaw avenue, Prof.
Albert C. Jacobs will speak on "Re-
ligion and Family Law."
-----

ii

GRUEN WATCHES D
HAL LE R'S
JEWELERS
STATE STREET AT LIBERTY

WATCH REPAIRING

IAMIONDS

FINE JEWELRY

Qaaca P Pla a
Dance Park lan W amplers Laka
Every Night and Sat. and Sun. Matinees
You'll sure step to CHICK FOWLER'S
Eleven-Piece Whoopee
CHIEF WAMPLER INDIANS
On the Air Over WIBM Jackson Weds. 6 to 7 P. M.
ANN ARBOR
PACKARD ST. GROUNDS

N-

1

MONDAY

iI

1,.

l

General
Educational conference at 4 a'-i

t

wmnter playground (OBOY) as clock in University high school aud-
"Baxter's Ignore The May Pesti--itorium. Prof. Lydia I. Jones, "The
lence Campaign," was the only ap-ICulture of the High School Stu-

EDUCA TIONAL
REGIMENTA TION"

i

Dr. Frank Aydelotte, president of
Swarthmore college, asserts that
the present "regimentation" in col-
leges under which the abler stu-
dents are held back to the mental
pace of the slowest, or even the
average, defeats their own highest
purposes. The result is, he says, that
"we do not do our best by precise-
ly that group of students for which
our higher insticutons exist." Dr.
Aydelotte has earned the right to
speak on ths subject, for at
Swarthmore the abler individual is
given the opportunity to move on
at a swifter pace.
The "regimentation" idea is like-
wise looked upon with disfavor at
the University of Chicago, where
President Hutchins would let the
time spent by a student in college
be determined not by the hours of
credit gained but by his use of the
opportunities offered him and by
his own qualification for going
forward. He might spend one year,
or three or four. And at Johns Hop-
kins, special provision has been
made for geniuses.
This tendency of putting whole
groups through the same intellec-
tual exercises has been described
by those who see in the process the
loss of the flower of the fruit of
culture-the personality of the in-
dividual in its highest expression.
Regimentation has come to mean
orderly formation, and champions
of a process of individualized edu-
cation see in it a dangerous ap-
proach to "mass education" cam-
parable to other products of this
machine age.
We sympathize with those who
point to the wilting "flower of the
fruit of culture" and we admire
Drs. Aydelotte and Hutchins for
their efforts to sort the wheat from
the chaff in their respective stu-
dent bodies, but we do not see how
a painstaking sorting process could
be made feasible in larger institu-
tions under the present system of
management-the only system, we
hasten to add, that makes possible
the control of student bodies that
number from ten to fifteen thous-
and each. Swarthmore is a smaller
college and experiments of this
kind are comparatively easy to car-
ry on, but in any institution of a
more unwieldly size; such individual
treatment would be virtually im-
possible unless the entire organi-
zation were revolutionized.
Such a revolution might prove
worthwhile but we should like to
observe its effects on the smaller
colleges before advocating a dras-
tic change in present methods.
We believe in some sort of edu-
cational standard. It gives the in-
dividual something by which he
may measure his ability. The solu-
tion of the moron and the genius
can be solved to a large degree by
proper college entrance examina-
tions, and different degrees of in-
.. 4lic a inb~onr nh rnr

ESULTS
LONDON

AT

(New York Times)
President Hoover, in summarizing
the work so quickly done at the
London conference, is generous in
praise of the Ministers who loyal-
ly cooperated in adopting a plan
for the financial stability of Ger-
many. He includes Premier Laval
of France. There is glory enough for
all. Mr. Hoover does not file any
claim for the credit of originating
the whole scheme, though it is
clear that his proposals were in the
main adopted. It is no time for the
'assertion of pride. of authorship.
The President is apparently not in
the least troubled by the differences
between the statements issued by
Secretary Stimson in London and
those given out by the Department
of State at Washington. If the Brit-
ish did, as Mr. Stimson declared,
have a good deal to do with both
devising and shaping the plan ac-
cepted, so much the better. The im-
portant fact is that statesmen were
summoned to London to meet an
accuate emergency; that they all
felt the need of acting rapidly; that
they agreed upon the measures to
which general consent was neces-
sary, and left the others out; that
they did, in fact, secure for Ger-
many immediate relief from the fi-
nancial strain under which she has
been laboring and gave her time
in which to turn round to decide
what next ought to be done.
Mr. Hoover himself is far from;
assuming that the entire work of
relief has been done. Only "sound
foundations' have been laid. What
is to be built upon them the next
few months must determine. The
conference clearly expects supple-
mentary efforts to be made, for, in
addition to the immediate exten-
sion of the credit of $100,000,000 for
a period of three months, and other
forms of banking aid, it stipulated
that a committee should be set up
by the Bank of International Set-
tlements to inquire into "'the fur-
ther credit needs of Germany."
Meanwhile, the German govern-
ment will be left free to helf itself
by every other means of negotia-
tion open to it. France has joined
with the other nations in putting
funds at the disposal of the Reichs-
hank b t ismr tha willin it

peal to the Spartan stoicism of the
true Michigan man (and woman
too, so there) that even approached;
the overwhelming proportions of
our little appeal. Lo:;
IGNORE WHITMORE LAKE
* «s *
EVEN YOU CAN SEE HOW IM-
PORTANT THAT IS.
* * *
Witheringham Bilgewater, A.B.,
LL.D., C.P.R., A.W.O.L., (and ES-
QUIRE to you, thank you) just
swept through Ann Arbor in his us-
ual coy manner and left behind him
this:
POEM FOR THE DAY
We glibly speak of caviar
And squab enclosed in glass,
Of luscious sucklings (derrier),
And lemon sauted bass.
We glibly prattle of such things
Though most content we'd be
To gnaw on week-old ohicken
wings
If they were only free.
* * *
Nephew Pltsch has also been
here. That's. one of Pltsch's ido-
sincracies. Being here. He's been
here constantly now, day and night
for two years, including vacations,
so-called. Pltsch, Qudgqp, and the
clock are the only really perman-
ent fixtures in the place. Pltsch
wants us to remind the Great
Reading Public, and the Great Am-
erican Middle Class especially, that
the Rolls Washtenaw County One-
Tenth Century Club is still recruit-
ing members. That is, the Club is
beginning to think about recruit-
ing members. Both of us are.
* * *
Pltsch, who seems just a LITTLE
anxious to keep himself in Rolls at
least most of the time, insists that
we make public a general Rolls in-
vitation to an excursion to the new-
ly discovered lake which nestles be-
hind Natural Science building. As
Our Readers will no doubt remem-
ber, Pltsch himself (modest crea-
ture) discovered this near-famous
watering place by the simple exped-
ient of walking into it one especial-
ly dark night recently.
The body of water, which is here-
after to be known as Lake Whoofle,
in honor of that celebrated family
if local renown, is said to support
the largest shipping on campus. Ad-
vance reservations for a tour of the
lake are being received by Rolls,
inc.
S* * *
According to news dispatches
from Detroit, Saunders Canoe Liv-
ery, it is said, is reported to have
been quoted, it is alleged, as hav-
ing advertised for sale in the class-
ified columns of the largest want-
ad medium in Detroit a number of
used Old Town canoes, it is report-
ed to have been said, it is allegedly
reported.
Canoeing reaches another low
ebb.
* * *
A GENTLEMAN OF PARTS
A brand new novel of the great
silences of the Northwest in 14-
count 'em-14 installments wil be-
gin in this space tomorrow. Modest
little Pltsch Whoofle, author of this
gripping tale of the great silences
of the Northwest, wishes especial
attention called to the fact that nu-
merous postponements of the ap-;
pearances of the first installment
of this gripping tale of the great
silences of the Northwest were due,
not to an atack of amnesia as was
previously reported but because he
forgot. When questioned regarding

his allegation, Pltsch is reported to
have said, "There's nothing to it.
I simply forgot."'
Hoping your the same,

Majestic: "Svengali," with John
Barrymore.
Michigan: "Man in Possession."
Wuerth: "Hell Bound."
General
Educational Conference at 4 o'-
clock in University high school aud-.
itorium, Prof. Benjamin F. Pittin-
ger, "Profesional Leadershinp in
Education."
Lecture at 5 o'clock in Natural
Science auditorium, Prof. Wilber
R. Humphreys, "Popular Ballads."
Concert at 8 o'clock in Hill Audi-
torium, Joseph Brinkman, pianist,
of the School of Music.
----"-
WEDNESDAY
Theatres
Lydia Mendelssohn: "A 1i s o n ' s
House" by Susan Glaspell, staged by
the Michigan Repertory players, di-
rected by Thomas W. Stevens.
Majestic: "Svengali."
Michigan: "Manin Possesion."
Wuerth : "Hell Bound."
General
Excursion No. Six at 1 o'clock
Ford Airport, Greenfield Village;
reservations Summer Sesison office.
Educational Conference at 4 o'-
clock in University high school aud-
itorium, Prof. Howard L. Turner,
"Our Rural Schools, Are They Bet-
ter or Worse."
Lecture at 5 o'clock in Natural
Science auditorium. Dr. Carl E. Gu-
the, "Hidden Story of the Ameri-
can Indian."
--
THURSDAY
Theatres
Lydia Mendelsohn: "A 1 iso n ' s
House."
Majestic: "Svengali."
Michigan: "Never the Twain
Shall Meet."
Wuerth: "Hot Heirs,"' with Ona
Munson.

v TICKET SALE AT
106 SOUTH MAIN

U

ONE SUMMER DAY
Affords ample time for a delightful 120-mile
round tnp Cruise on Detroit river and
Lake Erie from Detroit to
PUT-IN-BAY ISLAND PARK
Scene of the Battle of Lake Erie. Golf, bathing, boating
fiahing, picnic in the grove or dine at the fine hotels. Perry
Victory monument and wonderful caves.
/ C FR THE ROUND TRIP. CHILDREN V
75c WEEKDAYS. $1.25 ad6cSNAS
Return samue day
Str. P-In-Bay leaves foot of First St., Detroit, daily, 9 a.m. Home at 8
p.m., acept FzdI1:15 pam., for Putl-In-Bay, Cer Point ad Sanduaky,OQ
$7 A BARGAIN TWO-DAY OUTING $7
The Crescent Hotel Company and Ashley & Dustin
StemerLine havejoinedtoofferthe extremelylow rateof $7foratwo-day
outingLatPut-In-Bay. Leave Detroit any dayat 9a.m., arrive 1 moon.Lunch
at Crescent Hotel, also evening dinner and room; breakfast and dinner
the acct day. Round trip on steamer and dinner on the boat returning.
CEDAR POINT
Tbe Lkio of America. Special ezemdIoa every Firiday .with over tksse
hours at the Point, $1.50 round trip; other days one hour stopover, fare
11.75 round trip, Cedar Point or andnky. Return same day.
DANCING MOONLIGHTS
Leave Detroit 8:4 p.m. Wednesday - Thursday, 60e.
Home 11:30 p.ma. Saturday, Sunday, 75c.
Finzel's Snappy Bad.

dent."
Lecture at 5 o'clock in West Phy-
sics building. Prof. Floyd A. Fire-
stone, "Some Experiments with
Sound."
.-0.--
TUESDAY

Theatres

PECK'S DRUG
STREET

ASHLEY & DUSTIN STEAMER LINE
FootofFirst Street Uroit, Michigan

TAKE A RISE ON
STR. TAM I 0

TO

I

General

-H R

Lecture at 5 o'clock in Natural
Science auditorium, Prof John W.
Eaton, "The Irish Theatre."

FRIDAY

Theatres

teluIgence in between can e roper - an, Uu is mere L aunw uu nL
ly cared for by a varied curriculum; j would appear, to enter into special
but any revolutionary change in the financial and trade agreements
present system used by larger col-' with Germany, and to endeavor, by
leges and universities - "regimen- direct conference and friendly con-
tal" as they may be-would be ill- cessions on both sides, to smooth
advised until such a change is out the political friction between
proved unquestionably sound. the two nations. To further confer-
We do not heartily approve every ences of this regional kind, atten-
phase of the American method of tion will be turned after the Lon-
college "regimentation," but forj don gathering is dispersed, though
handling ten or fifteen thousand they, also, will be animated by the
students under one roof, so to speak, I spirit which prevailed at London-
we have seen nothing that can com- which was a desire on the part of
pare with the business-like and all to "'cooperate so far as lies with-
economical American system of in their power to restore confi-

Lydia Mendelsohn: "Alison's
House."_
Majestic: "Svengali"
Michigan: "Never the Twain Shall
Meet."
Wuerth: "Hot Heirs."
-o-
SATURDAY
Theatres
Lydia Mendelsohn: "A l i s on' s
House."
Majestic: "Night Nurse," with Ben
Lyon and Joan Blondell.
Michigan: "Never the Twain Shall
Meet."
Wuerth: "Hot Heirs."
General
Excursion No. Eight. Put-in-Bay,
Lake Erie, under the direction of
Prof. William H. Hobbs; tickets at

COME TO DETROIT
any day this Summer, park your car on the dock, and enjoy this all-day
sail over the great International Kighway of Lakes and Rivers. Free
Dancing on the boat. Splendid Cafeteria and Lunch Service. See Detroit
river front, Belle Isle, Lake St. Clair, the Fiats and the celebrated "Venice
of America." This cruise of 61 miles each way'takes you through a con-
stantly changing panorama of rare land and water views.
Port Huron, Sarnia, St. Clair Flats, Algonac
Starting this trip from Port Huror. passengers leave at 3:10 p. m., arriving
in Detroit at 7:45 p. m. Returning, leave Detroit at 9 the next morning,
arriving in Port Huron at 2:10 p. m.
Str. Tashmoo leaves Griswold St. Dock at 9 a. m., Daily and Sunday; arrive
Port Huron 2:10 p. ui. Returning, Leave PORT HURON, 3:10 p. m., arrive
Detroit ?:45 p. . FAUkE8 Tashmoo Park or St. Clair Flats, week days 75c;
Bundays, $1.00, R. T. Port Huron or Sarnia, Ont., one way, $1.10, R.T. $2.
TASHMOO PARK
halbfway between Detroit and Port Huron is Detroit's favorite pleasure park
where you may spend six hours and. return on Str. Tashmnoo in the
,ening. Free dancing in the pavilion; picnic in the grove, baseball, golf
and all outdoor sports and amusements.
" reading G. T. Ry~., between Detroit and Port
Ralroad TiCkets Idt'4clUiEh
Rai roa TicketsHuron, are good on Str. Tash~moo eIthsr dirsctios
Dancing Moonlights to Sugar Island
Drive to Detroit and enjoy an evening of music and dancing on Str.
Tashmoo and in the pavilion at Sugar Island. Tickets 'Sc. Park on the
dock. Leave at 8:45 every evening.
'Rf," POPULAR STR. TASHMOO o.U°dswo°d't

.

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