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June 22, 1930 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1930-06-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

JULY 20, 1930

THE SUDS= MICMGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, JULY 22, 1930

JULY 20, 1930 THE SUMMEL~ MICHIGAN DAILY
TUESDAY, JULY 22, 1930

MARIONETTE ,PLAY
TO OPEN JULY 28
Tatterman Puppets to Appear
in Two Performances at
League Theatre.

Establishes New High
Altitude Flying Mark

STRONG ARM OF LAW TRIES VAINLY
TO LASSO YOUTHFUL TREE-SITTERS
(By Associated Press)

LASSIFIEU
ADVERTISING

ACCLAIMED BY

CRITICS

The Tatterman Marionettes will ..'} .. 4.'**r' r'
be presented in two performances
of "Pan Pipes and Donkey's Ears"
by the William Duncan and Edward
Mabley company on Monday, July >
28 in the Lydia Mendelssohn the-
atre under the auspices of the Play a
Production department. Ruth Alexander,
Mills and Dunn, in their book, Kansas farm girl, who flew into
"Marionettes, Masks, and Shad- Aviation's Hall of Fame when she
ows," have said, "William Duncan recently established a new 26,000
and Edward Mabley, creators of the foot altitude record for women at
T a t t e r m a n Marionettes, have San Diego, Calif.
brought to the marionette stage,. - - -

unusual imagination and skill."
Much interest in the career of
the marionette has been evident
during recent years in America.
Perhaps the best known name as-
sociated with its promotion is that
of Tony Sarg, who has given con-

League to Entertam
With Bridge Party
Thursday Afternoon
All women enrolled in the Sum-
mer Session of the University are

CHICAGO, July 21. - The law'
shook an angry fist at endurance
this-and-thatters today and shout-
ed up at young Chicago to come
down out of the tree.
There was a conference called
today between juvenile and proba-
tion officers to see what could be
done. Meanwhile the department
of health was beginning to get
worked up about the business.
While the law was unwinding its
red tape with a view to lassoing
the tree sitters, et cetera, the
beaming sun was beating them to
it, driving the enduring adolescentsi
from the tree tops and into the'
comparative coolness of t h e i r
homes.
The health department an-
nounced that the tree-sitting con-
N]ESTLE
PERNE T WAVE
(Yrculine..
for RE-WAVING
As often as the new hair
growth requires, your hair
may be re-waved safely -
gently - beautifully with x
NESTLE Circuline.
. .
o

tests were apt-if carried too far-
to result in physical breakdowns if
not actually breakage. It pointed
out that permits from the depart-
ment are necessary of public ex-
hibitions in which life and limb
are endangered.
The law had a triumph-the cur-
few ordinance-which requires that
children up to age of 17 must be
off the street between 10 p.m. and
6 a. m. One argumentative young
tree sitter pretended to see a flaw
in this, in that a tree sitter is off
the street when he's tree-sitting.
Whether or not this argument will
put the law up a tree remains to
be seen.
Numerous complaints have been
made.

WANTED

HELP WANTED -- FEMALE-
Teachers (175)-for High School
and Grades wanted at once.
CONTINENTAL T E A C H E R S'
AGENCY, 316 Brooks Arcade
Bldg., Salt Lake City, Utah. 2-27

LOST
LOST-Saturday morning probably
on campus - pair glasses in
brown leather case. Mynette
Long, 106 Tappan Hall or call
3378. 17, 18, 19
LO0S T - (near libary)-Howard
open face gold watch. Watch,
chain and knife probably attach-
ed. Reward $10.00. Call at 322
N. State or phone D. S. R. Rice
at 9544. 17, 18, 19

1

siderable time to experimentationiinvited to attend an informal bridge

with the puppet.
The marionette has had a varied,
though continuous career through
the centuries. Hlaving its beginning
in the Oriental countries, it has
undergone many changes in its
passage from country to country.
The Japanese have been able to
develop the marionette to its high-
est degree of perfection, creating
creatures who were capable of
countless facial expressions, not un-
like the human.
Rome is credited with the pos-
session of three kinds of marion-
ettes: the Burattini, worn like a
glove; the Factoccini, jointed dolls
strung across the knees; and the
type which is in use today, the pup-
pet worked by strings and wires
from above.
The Tatterman Marionettes are
of the latter type and have been
acclaimed by many critics. They
were recently shown in New York
for 11 weeks and are at present on
a 20-week road engagement.

party to be given from 4 to 6 o'-
clock Thursday afternoon, July 24,
in the Kalamazoo room at the
Michigan League building, accord-
ing to an announcement by Mar-
garet Morn, '31, social chairman
of the League for the summer.
Following the bridge, light refresh-
ments will be served.
Guests may come in groups of
four, or wait until they arrive to
be seated at tables.
This is the first affair of this
kind to be sponsored by the Lea-
gue. Assisting Miss Morin are Isa-
belle Rayen, '31, summer president
of the League and Jessie Winchell,
;31.
McGILL UNIVERSITY: The Mc-
Gill Daily, student newspaper, re-
cently noted an increase in the
force of the curses used in men-
students. It maintained that the
men are being driven to greater
virility by the encroachments of
women on the field of mild swear-
ing.

Ii

BLUE

BIRD

HAIR SHOPPE
5 Nickel's Arcade
Phone 9616

r

1

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