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August 14, 1930 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1930-08-14

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THURSDAY, AUGUST 14, 1930

THE $Ui UWM MICHIGAN DAILY

GREEN OFFERS 9AiD
TO IAI M. BRUCKER,
ATTORNEY_ GENERAL
Retiring Governor Prepares to
Swing Vote by Introducing
Attorney at Ionia.
TO RETIRE IN JANUARY
Green Finds Chance to Praise
Executive's Qualities,
Urges Nomination.
(By Associated Press)
IONIA, Aug. 13.-Gov. Fred W.
Green came home today to submit
to his neighbors a report of his'
custody of the state's highest of-
fice. Although he does not sur-
render the executive chair until
January, it was his formal farewell
to public life and a greeting to the
home folks to whom he will soon
return.'
In his gesture of adieu to official{
life, the governor offered to drape
the administration mantle over the
shoulders of Wilber M. Brucker, at-
torney general. Figuratively, he
proffered Brucker his support for
Republican gubernatorial nomina-
tion. With his aproval, Brucker
was invited to appear on the Gov-
ernor's day program of Ionia Free
Fair.
Shows Friendship.
The arrangement was ample evi-
dence of political friendship, for,
Gov. Green and his business asso-
ciates have much to do with the
fair. Even more significant was the,
acceptance of an invitation by the
governor to introduce Brucker.
This gave the executive an oppor-
tunity he evidently wanted to
praise the attorney general, laud
his qualifications, and urge his,
nomination.
Old Rivalry Repeated.
Four years ago, from the same
platform, Gov. Green anounced his
candidacy for the governorship. He
then pitted himself against Alex
J. Groesbeck, who was seeking a
fourth term as governor. Today
the political battle cry of 1926 was
inferentially repeated.
With Gov. Green stepping aside
Brucker was pushed forward under
the campaign slogan, "Beat Groes-
beck." The war between the Green
and Groesbeck factions thus was
assured of perpetuity, even though
lines within the groups have
changed and both the Brucker and
Groesbeck organizations are far
different than were the Green and
Groesbeck battalions four years
back.

UNIVERSITY MUSEUM FIGURES SHOW
STUDENTS' INTEREST IN WILD LIFE

Pursutt of the complexities of
higher education does not dim the
common curiosity about the lives
of the furry wild things of the wood
and the lowly crawling things ofx
swamp and stream, judging from
the attendance at the tiny Univer-
sity of Michigan Museum Zoo on
Washtenaw Avenue in Ann Arbor.
Early in the spring of 1930 the
Museum completed a small circular
animal house and a reptile pond
to accomodate living specimens.
The buildings were the gift of an
anonymous donor.
As soon as the weather permitted
placing the animals outside they
began to attract attention in an un-
expected way, and by June had
over one hundred visitors daily. By
July it was found necessary to em-
ploy a custodian to guard the place,
his chief duties being to prevent
children from six to sixty from
pelting the turtles in the reptile
pond in an attempt to stir them
from their usual state of sun-baked
somnolence. In a single week in
July there was an afternoon and
evening attendance of 1698 people,
Sunday being the most popular
LEAGUE TO FETE
STUDENTS TODAY
All women enrolled in the Sum-
mer Session are invited to attend
the last tea of the season which
will be given at 4 o'clock this after-
noon in the garden of the League
building, by the undergraduate
staff of the Michigan League.
Students in the schools of Library
Science and Physical Education are
especially invited, and women fac-
ulty members of these schools will
be guests of honor. Those who have
not attended the former teas will
have an opportunity to meet Miss
Lucy Elliott, dean of women during
the Summer Session.
The social events sponsored by
the League during the summer
have been in charge of Isabelle
Rayen, '31, president; Roberta
Reed, '31, secretary-treasurer; and
Margaret Morin, '31, social chair-
man, assisted by Jessie Winchell,
'31. The League library has been
in charge of Cecilia Shriver, '31.1
Miss Lucy Elliott has assisted and
advised the committee during the
summer.
The entertainment for the sum-f
mer school students provided by
the League has included a bridge
party, an informal dance, teas hon-
oring the Play Production depart-
ment, the faculty wives, Mrs. Ilgen-
fritz, Dean Kraus and Mrs. Kraus
and Miss Elliott, and a formal re-
ception.

with 602, the average for other
days being 183, acocrding to Philipp,
Sankuer, custodian.
From the beginning the familiar.
fascination for reptiles made the
snake and turtle pond the most
popular department. Almost any
time finds a ring of observers of
all ages contemplating the smooth
undulations of the blue racer or the
stodgy crawl of the hod-nosed snake
which also entertains when angry1
by puffing his stout body and his-
sing loudly to comouflage himself
as a dangerous fellow. In addition
to these there are a variety of com-
mon grass snakes and a black wat-
er snake.
Though less spectacular the tur-
tles seem equally interesting. These
range in size from a silver dollar
to that of a large platter, and in-
clude snappers, box turtles, leath-
er-backs, painted, Chinese and land
turtles. Competition in the turtle
kingdom for a place in the sun is
strenuous, and furnishes enter-t
tainment for the frivolous as well
as material philosophical specula-
tion on evolution and the survival1
of the fittest for more sober stu-
dents.j
The animal house, a circular red,
brick structure topped by a bronze
weathervane by Carleton Angell,
Museum sculptor, contains two
black bears, several raccoons, a red
fox, coyote, two opossums and sev-,
eral specimens of Mephitis meph-
itis, or common skunk, safely de-
odorized.
SPORTALK t
A not so mighty Purdue eleven
will face plenty of tough opposition
in the 1930 gridiron campaign, due
to the loss of several of its most
prominent men.
Welch and Sleight, All-Americans
of last year will be missing from
the Boilermaker lineup.
Purdue will clash with Baylor for
the first time in what is regarded
as one of the foremost intersec-
tional games of the season. Last
year, it will be remembered, Pur-
due ruled the Western Conference.
And Baylor-experts pick the
Southerners to win the Southern
Conference championship. Yes,
the Purdue-Baylor battle should
prove to be mighty interesting.
For the first time since 1910 the
Boilermakers will meet the Univer-
sity of Iowa. This game will mark
the eighth 1peeting between the
two schools.

FASHION PLATE
The Fall coats which Paris is now
creating will show many exciting
silhouettes which suggest the most
popular effects of the recent dress-
es. Some of the styles from which!
you will make your selection are
predicted by Eleanor O'Malley inj
McCall's for September:
"Regardless of the seasons, Paris
usually shows very new lines first
in dresses, perhaps on the theory
that if they look unfamiliar and~
startling, they will be worn indoors
among friends. Later on, as soon as
the new features are assured suc-I
cess, they appear in coats, to be
worn outdoors among strangers.
"So the new season's coats do
many things characteristic of the
new dresses. The distinction be-
tween serviceable or sports coats
and coats for afternoon is more
marked than ever. Silhouettes are
more varied, with fit and fulness
skilfully introduced. Typical of the
new coats for practical wear is one
cut on princess lines with a double-
breasted front closing and a narrow
bet to marktthe waist. A flattering
type of coat has one of the new
up-standing collars to frame the
face, sleeves that widen toward the
elbow and a circular flounce.
"Sleeves are more interesting,
with trimmings or cut often widen-
ing the sleeve at the elbow or above
it. 1

Miss Talley May Sing
Again at Metropolitan
(By Associated Press)
CHICAGO, Aug. 13.-The girl of
the golden west, Marion Talley, has
foundathe west not as golden as the
east, after all.
Stopping off in Chicago Tuesday
on her way to New York, the young
diva said the drought had ruined
the corn crop on her 800-acre Kan-
sas farm and hinted she may meet
the loss by returning to New York.

PORTABLE
TYPEWRITERS
We have all makes.
Remington, Royals,
Corona, Underwood
Colored duco finishes.

O. D. MORRILL
314 South State St. Phone 661
FALL
f ootwear

$5 .SO

I

17
black
degrees
3
coPying
At af
dea les
Buy
a
dozen

Superlative in quality,
the world-famous
:PENMiS
give best service and
longest wear.
Plain ends, per doz. $1.00
Rubber ends, per doz. 1.20

26 NEW STYLES
As always, "first with the newest."
Featuring; brown, blue, green, and
the very popular black mat kid and
moire.
$5.50 to $8.50
Jacobson's

v
1
Ca my_ nn

ot.

ADDITIONS DAILY TO OUR TABLE OF
BARGAIN BOOKS
50c each
University
_______us Bookstore

CLEA RANGE
OF
ALL Summer Apparel
All Spring and Summer garments must be sold-and our determination
to dispose of them is evident in the remarkably low pricings. Note some of
the final clearance values mentioned below, and remember, there are many
more throughout the store.

:i 1-/

11~

A1 V

/1
l

COATS

$98.50 Values $39.50

$59.50

$39.50 $19.50 $19.75 "10.50
$29.50 $14.50 $15.00 $6.95

i

WHY are Kellogg's Corn Flakes the most
popular ready-to-eat cereal in the world?
Matchless flavor is the answer!
Just pour milk or cream into a brim-
ming bowl of these crisp and golden flakes
tomorrow. An ideal dish to enjoy late at
night. Delicious and easy to digest.
Ask your fraternity house steward or
your favorite campus restaurant to serve
Kellogg's-the original Corn Flakes.
4/tao

Three Splendid Groups of Suits at Less
Than Half Price

$29.5O

The most popular cereals-served
in the dining-rooms of American
colleges, eating clubs and fra-
ternities are mad. by Kellogg
in Battle Creek. They include
ALL-BRAN, Pep Bran Flakes,
Rice Krispies, Wheat Krumbles,
and Kellogg's Shredded Whole
Wheat Biscuit. Also Kaffee Hag
Coffee-th. ecoffee that lets
you sleep.

BLOUSES ODDS and ENDS
COTTON BLOUSES Rack and Table
$2.50 Values . . . . . . . $1.15 Vaues1

CORN FLAKES

CON
FA S
. AKS

SILK BLOUSES
$3.95 Values . . . . . . . . $1.95
$6.95 Values ........ $3.25
$12.50 Values..... ... $5.00

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