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June 30, 1930 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1930-06-30

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TAE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, JULY 30, 1930

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Published every morning except Mondey
during the University Summer Session by
the Board in Control of Student Publications.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication of all news
dispitches credited to it or not otherwise
credited inrthis paper and the local news
pubiished herein.
Entered at the Ann Arbor, Michigan.
postoffice as second class matter.
Subscription by carrier, $x,5o; by mail,
$ 2.00.
Offices:: Press Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan.
EDITORTAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
GURNEY WILLIAMS
Editorial Director .... . Howard F. Shout
City Editor -.... ....Harold Warren, Jr.
Women's Editor .... ........Dorothy Magee
Music and Drama ditor. . . William 7 Gorman
Books Editor......Russell E. McCracken
Sports Editor ...............Morris Targer
Night Editors
Denton Kunze Howard F. Shout
Powers Moulton Harold Warren, Jr.

never privileged to see. Surely the
attendance is not sufficiently un-
satisfactory at any time to war-
rant a failure to secure these. If
flms of a high order were regu-
larly shown, the theatre owners
would certainly find the increased
interest of the students and citi-
zens large enough to guarantee a
greater use of their playhouses for
entertainment and recreation.
--p

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Editorial Comment

f

,'

Dorothy Adams
Helen Carrm
Bruce Manley

Assistants
Cornelius H.
Bertha
Sher M.

Beukema
Clayman
Quraishi

Constance M. Wethy

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
dEORGE A. SPATER
Assistant Business Managers
William R. Worboys Harry S. Benjamin
Circulation Manager........Bernard Larson
Secretary ........... Ann W. Verner
Joyce Davidson Dorothy Dunlap
Lelia M. Kidd ~
WEDNESDAY, JULY 30, 1930
Night Editor-Harold O. Warren
MOTION PICTURES
We have mentioned this before
on numerous other occasions; we
have deplored the situation as it
exists; we have solicited and sug-
gested improvements; but the floodl
of poor and mediocre films has con-
tinued to pour into Ann Arbor.
There is but one mitigating cir-
cumstance, that they are no worse
now than they were during the reg-
ular session. This, however, may
evidence a lack of interest on the
part of the local theatre magnates
and their mighty overlord in the
grade and variety of pictures that
the Ann Arbor populace, student
and otherwise, has to see; it may
show supreme assuredness that
they will go to see them, no mat-
ter what kind they may be.
Possibly, and it is only barely
possible, they are unable to secure
films of a better quality. If this
is the case there would seem to be
few- advantages to the maintaining
of a huge chain of theatres. If a
producer on so large a scale is
forced to accept what is sent
them, he is surely business man
enough to obtain the inferior ones
for a low price. But the peculiar
angle of this is that the admission
price for all of them is the same.

COLLEGIATE DRINKING
(From The Dartmouth)
Contrary to the rabid assertionsr
of matronly sewing circles and pes-
simistic male reformers, the college
student of today is sober ninety-f
nine one-hundredths of the time.
When he does drink, it is usually
to parade his drunkenness,-at a
football game, at a dance, during a
vacation, at a social gathering,-
and it is on such occasions that a.
shocked older generation is most:
liable to see youth in action. False'
conclusions are natural.l
It is proable that if any of the
undergraduates who sometimes get
thoroughly oiled on midwinter
Saturday nights were to be com-
pletely isolated, with no chance of!
anyone seeing his antics, and no
possibility of telling anybody about
them afterwards, he would find
something more interesting than,
drinking to do.
Since the pecuniary element lim-;
its undergraduate liquor consump-
tion from one angle, and since
moral considerations limit it to a
certain extent from another, it is
evident that much of the too wide-.
ly scattered ballyhoohabout "the
deplorable state of affairs in Ameri-
can colleges with regard to the
liquor situation" is founded upon a
basis of fairly flimsy fact.
p

ASTED ROLLr
T OTRUE WORDS
IS SPOKE FROM
THE CHEST
While the press may be muzzled,
Rolls this morning is barking-par-
don, embarking on a policy of rev-!
elations which will turn the cam-
pus upside down.
Aided by the Planting and Dig-
ging department of the University,
Rolls wholly favors the annual
summer shake-up and dig-up.
Formerly pedestrians were safe.
from the pit-falls of college life.
Today, and for the last few weeks,
treaders of the campus walks
marched carefully, fearful that at
every step they might suddenly fall
through the campus.
This is decidedly not a criticism.
We are strictly in favor of the P.
and .D. department's system of
starting to plant an electric light
pole and ending up by filling in a
cistern in back of University hall.
But, asks we, what if somebody, us
excepted, of course, should fall into
the inter-corner rapid transit tun-
nel for allowing heat to wander
from here to there? We refer of
course to the gigantic excavations
back of Memorial hall.
We may be digressing. But we
wonder whether the recent hot
weather which has resulted in fill-
ing all lectures with "Uhs" and
"And-uhs," not even fastened to-
gether by a few bolts, although
also as a result of the weather the
nuts are present, has not resulted
from the opening of the heat tun-
nels. The P. and D department
should offer some announcement.l

C About Books
MRS. HEY WARD'S
"RAILWAY STATION" NOVEL.
Three A Day by Dorothy Heyward;
The Century Company; Price $2.50;
Review Copy from Wahr's Univer-
sity Bookstore.
Dorothy Heyward is the wife of
Dubose Heyward and was co-au-
thor with him of the splendid book
of negro life, Porgy. Mr. Heyward
surely must have been the better
half, for there is no evidence in this
book by Mrs. Heyward of writing
of the calibre of Porgy. The novel
is a very light one, flimsily written,
and its only literary value rests in
its abundance of colloquialisms of
the stage. These are quite interest-
ing, and something that should be
watched, for out of such broken
language, or dialect, if you chose to
call it by that name, may develop
a truly American dialect fiction.
But the story is trite and dull. The
Characterization is not particularly
acute.
Three A Day is the story of life on
a vaudeville circuit. Ric, the hero,
leaves, early in his twenties when
success is smiling upon him, a vast
audience to wait for him while he
sits home in his bathtub composing
a concerto. For this heresy he is
thrown off the concert stage, and
lives in a garret where he com-
poses very poor mtisic. At last he
hitches up with a musical pair, Jan
and Tad, and the three fight the
conventional obstacles in the road
to stage success until they land a
contract for a three-a-day at the
Palace (theuPalace is the symbol of
success). But again R.ic forgets to
show up because of that wretched
concerto. Jan is peeved at this un-
forgiveable sin, for she had been
born and bred in the ethics of the
stage that "the curtain must go
up." They go back to a two-a-day
routine, and after a time Jan makes
up with Ric. But he is doomed to
be a second rater always because of
the hybris he displayed in his early

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HAS OPENING'
NEL BROUGHT
WEATHER?

THE HEAT TUN-
ON THE HOT

CRIME AND WAR
(From The Daily Illini)
"Unconsciously the United States
is preparing for war on a tremen-
dous scale," writes James Stephens,
Irish philosopher, in the New York
Times magazine.
"Americans will deny this, will
say that it is unthinkable," he con-
tinues. "I have read a great num-
ber of short stories in a great num-
ber of your 'magazines. Have you
ever stopped and considered that
most of the plots of your short
stories are based upon violence and
crime? Crime is in the air here."
By developing in the public mind
an acceptance of violence and
crime, these stories and newspaper
reports take the first step in foster-
ing acceptance of war, the Irish-
man points out. As soon as we
automatically accept violence and
crime, he believes our foreign re-
lations will show new and violent
tendencies. Jingoism and war
might logically result.
There is some basis in his charg-
es that the public mind does influ-
ence a nation's attitudes. Recall
the public hostility to the League
of Nations idea because many of
our citizens held to the long-taught
principle that the League would
end our "splendid isolation." Ab-
olition of war depends not alone up-
on statesmen negotiating peace
treaties, but upon the point of
view of the masses they represent.
In passing, we might point out
that 70 per cent of all money ap-
propriated by the Congress recent-
ly adjourned went for the prepa-
ration of and payment for future
and past wars. This fact, combined
with more wide-spread education
in the horrors of modern war,
should offset any "unconscious ac-
ceptance" of war which Mr. John1
Public might get from readingj
crime stories.

* * *
Here is our diary, showing the
result of the sweltering, listering,
broiling, frying and etc. weather,
all of which means that our goose
m ll f a M-M ^%Ia

At no one time in the last month
or two has there been more than
a single picture of major interest
or importance in the city. This,
we realize, is largely a matter of
taste and consideration, but when
we find such a large majority of
the campus and town population
agreeing with us, there must be
some foundation for it. Ann Ar-
bor is sufficiently large and suf-
ficiently intelligent to deserve
something better.
Of course, as we intimated be-
fore, the fault may lie in the mo-
tion picture producers. We have
heard a great deal about catering
to the public taste, which is de-
scribed as consisting of a mixture
of sex, jazz, and brainlessness. If
the result of satisfying this de-
mand is to throw on the theatre
screens of the country such trite,
sentimental, low-comedy pictures
as we have been forced to witness
on the majority of our visits to the
motion picture houses, it is time
that some long and loud com-
plaints were made.
The theatre is recognized as one
of the most potent educational
forces in America, along with the
press and the radio. Three-fourths
of the nation experience all the joy
and romance of their lives vicar-
iously through this medium. If
the sum total of the effect of this
education has been a history of
sordid crime, a deadening of re-
ligion, a general moral decadence,
it is not too much to suggest that
it has been the wrong kind of edu-
cation.
True it is that there have been
some signs of change for the bet-<
ter but they are few and isolated.1
Some of the great epic pictures,
one or two more powerful of theI
war dramas, and the simpler and '
more realistic of the romances have I
shown the possibilities.t
However, the fact remains thatI
thre are many notable nroduc- t

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nTnaz we are cooked. twenties when he let a full housei
July 27-Sunday. Met a Sorosis wait forty-five minutes for him on- i
sister from Alabama. Hot evening ly to have the money returned at
"Why," said she "You look hot',; the box. The story ends on this
"Wy," sid" e " look hot? note.
Alabamy Bound is a good song. Mrs. Heyward, however, in thej
July 28-Took a home-bred Mich- story, had possibilities for a good
igan girl to audible portraits. News novel. The story of a second rater
real-Atlantic squadron. "Is that," can always present opportunities
she says coyly, "a battleship?" for writing, and interesting writing.
Especially in this case with Ric,
July 29-Still warm weather. And whose violation of the most holy of
just suppose the P. and D. depart- holies of theatrical ethics offers a
ment should line the heating tun- kind of foreboding to his second
nels with ice-packs. We ask you, frateness, does she have a splendid
would that help? opportunity. When one looks at
But that is only what we wrote such a portrait of second rateness
down. As a matter of fact we went ,as is found in the portrait of the
canoeing Saturday, but dared not artist in Aldous Huxley's Antic Hay,1
record it for fear we might be iand places it beside Mrs. Heyward's
found out. picture of Ric, there is quite a1
draft. I think the latter cannot
She seemed like a nice girl. come up to Huxley because of the
Didn't smole Didn't drink. Ob- shallowness of her work, she is not
jected to profanity. Even discover- intense, or deliberate enough in the
ed that she goes to church. working of her effects. I think she
So, liking her, and who knows has been too interested in writing a
why, we said, "May we go to church story that would appeal to the Sat-
with you tomforrow?" She said yes.urday Evening Post reading public
So that was all arranged (Thisi s to spend enough time on fine draw-
So utt was all arraged (This ings of character, to spend enough
t sd time to develop fully a significant
must wear a tie and a coat." idea for her novel. It is because1
But having gone to the Sorosis Huxley has done this that his story
habitation to apologize for not is a better one. One does not need'
having gone to church, she and we to exert oneself a bit to read about!
entered upon an argument. She and understand the people of Mrs.'
referred us to "Either the fifth or Heyward's book, they are all quiteI
the twentieth chapter of Exodus. stereotyped, romanticized; you havej
[ forget which, but if you read all met them all before in other
of Exodus you will find what I wretched "railway station" novels!
mean." such as this is. You will probably
always meet them as long as there
By mistake we read the fifth and are railway stations to sell such
twentieth chapters of Proverbs. If novels in.

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Varsity
Methods

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Shirts-that are white, spot.
lessly clean and comfortably
ironed.
Collars-that fit perfectly.

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shrunk.

fluffy and

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THE STUDENT AND MILITARISM
(From The Butler Collegian)
The effect of military training
upon the student has never been,
demonstrated. Since the introduc-
tion of forced military service into
the schools we have been able to
see the effect only through pa-
rades, fake manoeuvers and other
"make - believe." If war were to
thrust itself upon the United States
now, would those men who had
been trained in compulsory service
in state universities prove the
worth of their military education?
It is not necessary to be a jingo-
ist to see the value of military
training for the student. Among
the numerous elective courses now
offered in universities, it would
seem to be a sort of balance wheel.
The average college student needs
discipline. He needs to be taught
how and when to obey. He needs
to have ingrained into him a little
respect for his superiors. The main
difficulty that college heads have
found with incorrigible students is
their tendency toward irreverence.
What is better for the abolition of
this irreverence than a taste of

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you don't know it, they are warn-
ings against wild women and
strong drink. Don't ask us if there
is a destiny that "heaves through
space and moulds the times with
mortals for its fingers." In my
diary I noted down 12 resolutions
for next *ew Year's day. And the
mere 10 commandments are in the
discard. Have been for a long time,
but don't you dare tell. Don't you
dare!

And while we are on the subject
of making confessions, we will
make a few that other folks don't.
Did you know that Michigan
moonshine goes sour when made
into cocktails? Somebody told us
that. This is not a personal state-
ment.
Do you know why three personal
friends have fastened their frater-
nity emblems to the bottom of the
mattress this summer? We know.
Do you know why summer is no
time to date red-heads?
Do you know what football play-
ers do in the summer when they
can't get their names in the paper
for carrying ice?

R.E.M.
Alec Waugh, whose "Hot Coun-
tries" was the Literary Guild's
choice for May, has departed for
England where he will play cricket
and drink beer. He will return in'
the early fall to witness the publi-
cation by Farrar and Rinehart of
his new novel, "Sir, She Said," and
will then proceed westward to set
sail from San Francisco for Tahiti.
Did you catch the fast one?
i a
And as a final note we toss out
the following headline, without
comment, but filched from the
front page of the Daily:f
TEXTBOOK SELLING
ON ETHICAL BASIS
STATES EDMONSON
We're glad to know it.

To be brief, let us launder
your clothes in our modern
plant with the ultimate of
care and exactness that is so
typical of Varsity Service.

Phone 4219

i
Liberty at Fifth

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