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July 13, 1929 - Image 1

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1929-07-13

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THfE WEATHER
Generally Fair with Possible
Showers

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MEMBER OF THE

ASSOCIATED
PRESS

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Vol. X, No. 17 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, JULY 13, 1929 PRICE FIVE CENTS

EDUCATOR DESCRIBES
DALTON PLAN METHOD
IN ADDRESS AT UNION
EXPLAINS AIM OF EASTERN
SCHOOL AS PROVIDING
VARIED WORK
FORMAL CLASSROOMS
DISCARDED IN SYSTEM
Studying Done in "Subject Shops";
New Schedules Made Daily
for Individual
"A New Thing Each Day," is the
aim of Miss Helen Parkhurst,
principal of Children's University
school, New York city, who spoke
on "The Dalton Plan at Work" to
educators at the Union last night.
She describes her school as one
which is attempting to make it
possible for both teachers and chil-
dren to do things in their own way
and to establish individual methods'
of thinking and working for them.
The plan of the school is to give
children subject matter in the form
of a job which roughly corresponds
to a month's work. The pupils may
organize their time as they wish,
that is, they may spend several
days entirely on history and when
that unit is completed, they may
turn to an entirely different sub-
ject. Their progress is marked by
charts and they are absorbed, not
only in their job, but in seeing "how
the game works.'
There are no formal classrooms,
the work being done in laboratories
or "subject shops" where a great
deal of activity is constantly going
on. Time for definite instruction
is afforded by the building up of
new schedules each day for the
teachers on the basis of the achieve-
ment of a group of pupils and their
readiness for the next unit of
work. Individual differences are
given much attention but the con-
ference groups are fairly large in
order that each may benefit
through a directed interchange of
experiences and interests. In these
conferences plans are made which
are carried out during the "labor-
atory" periods.
Each teacher is responsible for
a carefully selected group of chil-
dren in whom she is deeply inter-
ested and with whom she can thor-
oughly sympathize. She must watch
that the energies of those in her
advisory group are safeguarded and
they may advance as quickly as
they can, Miss Parkhurst explained.
GRADUATE SCHOOL
RANKS FIRST IN SIZE
Enrollment figures for the Sum-
mer Session published in the Thurs-
day issue of The Daily erroneously
credited the School of Education
.with the largest registration and
enrollment increase of any college.
The Graduate school has the larg-
est with 1,405 students, showing a
gain of 206 over last year. The
figures originally given for the edu-
cation school referred to elections,
and not number of students.
The College of Literature, Science
and the Arts has 906 persons en-
rolled, the School of Education

being third with 505. Eight hun-
dred seventy-six of the elections
made in this college are by stu-
dents registered in the Graduate
school.
Teachers Fund Board
Has Special Meeting
Convening for the purpose of
discussing the formulation of cer-
tain policies governing the business
procedure of the Board, the State
Teachers Retirement Fund board
held a special meeting in the office
of Dr. J. B. Edmonson, dean of the
School of Education, last Thursday ,
afternoon.
Those attending were President
E. C. Warner, Mount Pleasant; Mrs.!
Nellie Chisholm, Muskegon; Mrs.
Georgianna Larabie, Lansing; T. J.
Knapp, Highland Park; Prof. James
Glover of the University, and State

Lindy, Anne, Mary Open Air-mail Service

INTERLOCHEN M USIC1 Willy To Turkey?3
CAMP OFFERS UNIQUE
SUMMER ACTIVITIES.

This famous trio was photo-
graphed at the air terminal, Glen-
dale, California, just before Lindy
took off in the giant Ford tri-mo-
tor, City of Los Angeles, on the
first leg of the trans-continental
ISAACSDIC SE
PERNICIOUS ANEMIA

Prof.

Fisher Will Speak Before
Group on Activities of
Safety Practice

INSTITUTE MEETS TODAY
Opening with a lecture on "Child
Hygiene" by Prof. Edith S. Bryan
of the University of California the
fourth Public Health institute of
the Summer Session resumed the
series of lectures given each week-
end for the benefit of those inter-
ested in public health work of any
description. The presiding officer
was Dr. C. A. Neafie, health officer
from Pontiac, Michigan.
As the principal feature on yes-
terday's program Dr. Rophael Isaacs
of the Simpson Memorial institute
of the University spoke on "Pub-
lic Health Aspects of Pernicious
Anemia."
"From the public health point of
view there are three principal
points of interest in the disease of
pernicious anemia. They are, first,
the early recognition of cases; sec-
ond, tl3e importance of following
the beginning treatment with the
continuous use of liver or potent
liver extract for the rest of the
patient's life, and third, the pre-
vention of the disease in those who
are constitutionally susceptible,"
Dr. Isaacs stated. He also gave a
review of the ymptoms, their cause
and the newer discoveries in the
treatment of the disease.
As a final interesting feature, a
description of an individual who
was more susceptable to pernicious
anemia was given by Dr. Isaacs.

air-rail service from Los Angeles
to New York. Pictured left to right
are Mrs. Charles A. Lindbergh, Mary
Pickford, who christened the first
plane taking off, and Lindy, who
is technical advisor.
NAVAL DISARMAMENT
PRHOBLEMDISCUSSED
Statement Construed as Indicating
Greater Intention to Join
Forces with League
EXPLAINS GIBSON VISIT
(By Associated Press)
LONDON, July 13.-Prime Minis-
ter Ramsay MacDonald and Ambas-
sador Dawes, for the third time
since the ambasador arrived in
Great Britain, have met and dis-
cussed naval disarmament.
But aside from a promise from
the British premier that he would
make a statement soon on the mat-
ter there was nothing to indicate
after the meeting, which lasted
several hours, what took place
there.
The ambassador said he had had
a talk with Mr. MacDonald, but!
could make no further statement
at present.
About the same time the Amer-
ican embassy issued the following
statement:'
"When the preparatory commis-
sion at Geneva adjourned in May
it was for the purpose of giving
time for some direct discussions
between the governments in regard
to the naval problem. The ex-
changes are now in progress and
Mr. Gibson's visit was for consulta-
tion in connection with this."
It was assumed from the state-
ment Ambassador Gibson had come
here from Brussels on another visit
since his trip to June 24, and had
conferred with Mr. Dawes and pos-
sibly others.

THREE HUNDRED STUD E N T S
FROM 36 STATES ARE
REPRESENTED
MANY NOTED MUSICIANS
ARE GUEST CONDUCTORS
Swimming, Canoeing, Ball, Track
and Other Sports Feature
Summer Program
With an approximate enrollment
of three hundred students and a
faculty of forty teachers recruited
from the ranks of the country's
leading symphony orchestras and
the staffs of many of the more
prominent educational institutions,
the National High School Orches-
tra and Band camp, under the di-
rection of Joseph E. Maddy of the
School of MVusic, has begun its sec-
ond season of activity at Interlo-
chen, fourteen miles east of Tra-
verse City. Student players from
36 states, the District of Colum-
bia, aftd Hawaii are represented in
the personnel of orchestra and the
band.
Noted Conductors Appear
Four programs are presented
weekly, two by the band and two
by the orchestra, in the Bowl, a
large natural amphitheater on the
wooded shores of one of the lakes
from which the camp takes its
name. Nationally famous music-
ians act as guest conductors at
these concerts. The roster for the
present season is composed of such
names as John Philip Sousa, Ed-
gar Stillman-Kelley, Howard Han-
sen, Leo Sowerby. The progranms
presented are not only of an ex-
ceptional musical excellence but
consist of some of the greatest mas-
terpieces in musical literature. To
date the orhcestra has included in
its performances Beethoven's Sym-
phony No. 3 "Eroica," Bizet's L'Ar-
lesienne Suite No. 1.
Green to Address Camp
Recognizing th, unique oppor-
tunities for close contact with and
observation of the finest type of
music instruction, Teachers college,
Columbia university, and the Cin-
cinnati Conservatory of Music as
well as the School of Music of the
University have established exten-
sion departments at the camp, and
courses in various branches of pub-
lic school music and theory of mu-
sic are being conducted by staff
members of these organizations.
During the summer the camp will
be addressed by a number of wel-
known speakers among whom are
Gov. Fred W. Green, Dean Edward
H. Kraus of the University Summer
Session, United States Senator A.
H. Vandenberg, Dr. John Erskine,
noted author.
Amy Loomis Success
Understudying King
(By R. Leslie Askren)
Substituting for Shirley King in
the part of Rosalie, heroine of Salis-
bury Fields' comedy, "Wedding
Bells," Amy Loomis, manager of
the Mendelssohn Theatre, scored a
distinct triumph last night. Miss
King was taken seriously ill with
an attack of ptomaine poisoning
but managed to appear Thursday
night. Last night her condition
became more serious and Miss
Loomis offered to take the part.
Director Wallace called rehearsal
at 1 o'clock yesterday afternoon.
At 8:30 o'clock Miss Loomis "went

on" and carried her part through'
flawlessly. An appreciative au-
dience demanded several curtain
calls.
Miss Loomis' interpretation dif-
fered distinctly from Miss King's.
The scheming Rosalie was played
as a delightfully intelligent woman,
swift witted, and with all the
charm of a high comedy character.
Miss Loomis, able and experienced,
brought many of the well tried ac-

John N. Willys
Auto magnate of Toledo who is
reporteud disposing of his holdings
in order to accept an ambassador-
ship. It is believed that he is slat-
ed as envoy to Turkey.
FARM BOARD MEMBERiS
CONFER WITH HOOVER
Chares Wilson Appointed to Board
Leaving One Vacancy Yet
To Be Filled
ABANDONS VIRGINIA TRIP
(By Associated Press)
WASHINGTON, July 13.-Aban-
doning his week-end trip to the
Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia,
President Hoover conferred at
length today with Alexander H.
Legg, chairman of the new Federal
Farm board and Carl Williams, onej
of its members.
They were the first of the ap-
pointees to arrive in Washington,
and the President had planned to
take the mto his fishing lodge to
go over the farm situation with
them. Bad weather and impossible
roads interfered.
Meanwhile it was announced at'
the White House that Charles Wil-
son, former New York state com-
missioner of agriculture, had been
appointed to the board, leaving but
one vacancy to be filled. Unlike the
other members, Wilson will rep-
resent no particular branch of'
the agricultral industry. He is a
practical general farmer, and in ad-
dition has been in close touch with
the fruit and dairying industriesI
of the Northeast.
The membership of the board to-
day is as follows: Secretary Hyde
of the Agricultural department, ex-
officio. Legg, chairman, represent-
ing business and finance; James C.
Stone of Lexington, Ky., vice-chair-
man, representing tobacco; Carl
Williams of Oklahoma City, cotton;
C. B. Denman, of Armington, Mo.,
livestock; Charles C. Teague of Los
Angeles, fruit growing; William S.
Schilling, St. Paul, dairying, and!
Wilson, representing general agri-
culture.

ENDURANCE AVIATORS
TERMINATE BRILLIANT
FLIGHT OF_24 HOURS
I IMMINENT DAMAGE TO PLANE
FORCES "TOUGH HOMBRES"
TO EARTH
BOTH FLYERS PRAISE
SHOWING OF ENGINE
Previous Mark Shattered by More
Than 72 Hours; Plane Was
"Gassed" 37 Times
(By Associated Press)
CULVER CITY, Cal., July 13 -
After 10 days and a quarter of an-
other in the air, two flyers com-
pleted a new aviation epic here to-
day when they brought their plane
Angelo to earth, bearing a new re-
cord for sustained flight.
Loren W. Mendell of Los Ange-
les, and Roland C. (Pete) Rein-
hart of Salem, Ore., upon landing
their Buhl sedan aeroplane at 2:13
o'clock, had been aloft 246 hours,
43 minutes, and 32 seconds, exceed-
ing the previous record by 72 hours,
42 minutes, and 33 seconds. The
Angelo, powered by a second-hand
Wright Whirlwind motor, left the
ground Tuesday morning of last
week at 7:29:30 o'clock. Since that
time the previous record had been
established at Cleveland.
The gruelling battle between man
and machine in this magnificent
test in the skies ended in a draw
in as much as both man and en-
gine were ready to carry on. It was
a fabrication of the second-hand
ship which gave way. The flight
was brought to an end when the
tail droup started fluttering and
made it impossible to carry on the
thirty-eighth refuelling.
"We had to give the engine credit
for everything," was the first com-
ment of Chief Pilot Mendell as he
clambered from the ship. "Never
before has an airplane engine done
anything like this." If the engine
could talk, perhaps it would have
paid (a light compliment to the
men, for never before have two
men undergone such a test.
The old Angelo had traveled
some 17,000 miles before the flight,
and the Wright Whirlwind had a
similar record of some ~450 hours in
the air before it was refitted for
this flight. In fact it was just an
undertaking of experienced parties
for the two flyers were trained to
discipline and endurance in the fly-
ing conditions in the World War.
BASEBALL SCORES
American League
Philadelphia 10-8; St. Louis 0-2.
Cleveland 3; Washington 2.
New York 12; Chicago 2.
Detroit 13; Boston 12,
National League
Pittsburgh 6; Philadelphia 4.
New York 4; Chicago 3.
Cincinnati 4; Boston 3.
Brooklyn 8; St. Louis 7.

SOUTHERN EDUCATOR SAYS SUMMER
SESSION IS FOE OF PROVINCIALISM

SCHINZ FAVORS MORE OPPORTUNITY
FOR FACULTY-STUDENT CONTACTS

i

Discipline of Summer S t u d y
Develops in Short Time Powers
of Endurance, Fortitude
In his attempt to defend, analyze,
and explain the summer session,
Edgar W. Knight, who, because he
teaches at the University of North
Carolina, knows whereof he speaks,
emphatically insists, "The summer
school is probably the most effect-
ive institution in American educa-
tion for putting provincialism and
narrowness of view to rout."
In enlarging this statement by
adding that discipline, which flour-
ishes vigorously in the summer ses-
sions of large colleges and univer-
sities, develops in those few weeks
the powers of endurance, patience,
prudence, and fortitude, Knight
succeeds in giving a pretty sweep-
ing statement of the merits of the
summer school.
The diversity of interests and the

I

cause of this. very characteristic,
must undergo a sterner discipline1
than that which prevails during
the winter session, when students1
are, on the whole, nearer one type.j
The result of this discipline is, as
Knight asserts, a routing of pro-
vincialism and a nearer approach
to the open-minded state. r.
The disdain which once kept
teachers from joining the staff of
the summer session is now com-
pletely dispelled, Knight believes.
The professor has found that the'
students whom he instructs in the
summer are eager for knowledge,I
and are more willing to accord him
appreciation and hard work than
will attendants of the regular ses-
sion. An added inspiration is his
reward for having served during
these warm months when work, for
psychological as well as climatic
reasons, is harder to accomplish.
Knight concludes his observa-
tions with this comment: "It isn't

"The Michigan Summer Session,
of which almost one-third is over,
compares extremely favorably in
my experience with many others1
elsewhere," declared Prof. Albert
Schinz, of the University of Penn-
sylvania, in an interview granted
recently. Professor Schinz is giv-
ing several courses in the romance
languages department this summer,
and has taught summer courses at
Harvard, Chicago, California, Cor-
nell, and Colorado.
"If there is one wish that I
might mention, however," Profes-
sor Schinz continued, "it would be
to have occasionally an opportunity
for contact of the visiting faculty
members with their new students
for informal discussion of studies
elsewhere than in the class room."I
"There may be as elsewhere a
marked difference between stu-
dents in the regular school year
and students in the summer," he

find a very serious attitude in the
classroom. There seems to be much
earnestness and purpose in the
minds of those attending during
this period."
Professor Schinz indorsed the
work of the romance languages de-
partment at Michigan heartily,
stating that "it was progressing
into one of the most complete in
the country." The training being
given in new methods of teaching
French language he also thought
very beneficial, and could not help
raising the standard of literature
classes as well.
Professor Schinz declared that
he has been very agreeably sur-
prised to find Ann Arbor so pleasant
in the summer time. He indicated
that he thought the campus very
beautiful with its great elms, hand-
some buildings, and shady walks.
He also said that he found the
arboretum very interesting in its
wild, uncultivated condition and

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