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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

July 11, 1929 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1929-07-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THURSDAY, JULY 11, 1929

THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGN TFHRU

STHE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREE

POLITICAL ACTIVITIES
OF COUNTY DISCUSSED
AT SCHOOLOF VOTIE
SMALL POLITICAL UNIT HAS
TWO SORTS OF SERVICE
SPEAKER DECLARES I
ATKINSON MAKES SPEECH
Many County Institutions Dubbed
Inadequate During Course
of Lecturing
Continuing the Citizenship school
series of lectures on county gov-
ernment, the speakers of the ses-
son yesterday afternoon presented
discussions upon the three leading
activities of the county-welfare,
education, and election.
Mr. Raymond Atkinson, of Ohio
Institute, Columbus, discussed the
problem of county welfare work.
Mr. Atkinson, basing his informa-
tion upon the experence which he
has obtained from his work in the
countiesofeOhio, observed that the
problems of welfare administration
may be limited to three classes-
the delinquent, the dependent, and
the defective.
Two classes of service, institution-
and non-institutional, are involved,
the speaker explained. While the'
majority of the problems of institu-
tional administration fall to the lot
of the state, the county still con-'
trols its poor-house and its jail.
Practically all the responsibilities
of outdoor relief ar left to its care,
those of poor relief and the care of
children holding an important posi-
tion.
"County institutions," said Mr.
Atkinson, "are a byword of today."
Stressing the inadequacy of the
county jail and the county in-
firmary, he continued to point out
the scarcity of the model institu-
tion.
The beginning that is yet to be
made must be an investigation of
the facts," concluded Mr. Atkinson.
"After that, constructive adminis-
tration, rather than the immediate
and temporary type of relief now
provided, must be supplied. This
can only be done through the em-
ployment of trained, full-time offi-
cials."
Miss Nelly Becker, whose work lies
in the field of educational adminis-
tration, next presented the discus-
sion of the county and the school.
The one outstanding problem of
education today, she asserts, is that
of providing equal opportunities for
all children living within the con-
fines of the state. "The county,"
she added, "can aid in the promo-
tion of its solution, since the larger
unit of administration which it
would provide would evenly dis-
tribute the burden of taxation."
"Though the state as a whole
should be responsible, if the county
unit is not the taxing agency, the
problem of unequal opportunity is
not solved," Miss Becker concluded.

CAMP BOYS RECEIVE PHYSICAL EDUCATION

- nnnIlnllnllnnIlIIlnnIuIIIIIIIul IIIntllull L A S S 1 F i E
NEWS FROM ADVERTISING
OTHER COLLEGES = THE RAGGEDY ANN BEAUTY
SHOP OFFERS A
alIIIIII111IIII IIIIIIII1111111111I i Marcel at 75c; Finger wave at $1.00;
University of Iowa-More than i Permanent wave at $8.50. Dial 7561.
200 calls were made by the Visit- MACK TUTORING AGENCY
ing Nurses association in Iowa City Open for Summer School
during June. Families in need of 310 S. State St. Phone 7927
service who were cared for totaled TYPING-Theses a specialty. Fair
35, bringing the entire numer reg- rates. M. V. Hartsuff, Dial 9387.
estered this year to 82. Bedside
care was given 56 patients. The FOR RENT
largest number of calls were for in-
n cP oa in- I j-FOR -RENT--Lower floor of nicely

iailuy auu ixieaicai cases.

Photo shows a few of the boys go through their setting up cxer- complete medical examination, andj
who enjoy a ten to twelve day out- cises. The average gain of weight doctors report any physical defect
to the child's parents. University
ing at the Student Christian as- for each boy is somewhat over 3 students direct the calesthenics and
sociation's Fresh Air camp ready to pounds. Each boy undergoes a games.

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Systems Of Ventilators Adds Odor
To Theater's Dramatic Resources
One of the most valuable fea- cessfully in other auditoriums sim-
tures of the equipment in the new ilarly equipped, is that it is pos-
Lydia Mendelssohn theater, where sible to waft any desired odor
the Michigan Repertory players are through the theater at any time,
now presenting their third week! thus adding greatly to the realism
of plays, is the large ventilating of the scene. In one case in New
system which is the only one of York, where it was desired to give
its type in Ann Arbor, and which the effect of an orange grove, a
was installed after engineers perfume manufactured from or-
throughout the country advised it anges was sent through the ven-
as the best method of keeping the tilators, and it was a shocked and
air in the theater cool and fresh i unbelieving audience on the open-
at all times. ing night which declared 'the set-
The theater is equipped with two ting so real that you could actually
large blowers, one at the back of smell the oranges." They failed to
the balcony, which removes all of realize until the public announce-
the foul air, and another at the ment on the following day just how
back of the auditorium downstairs, "that touch of realism" had been
which sends the fresh air into the accomplished.
theater at all times. It differs from The temptation has been very,
most systems in that fresh air is great during the run of the plays
constantly being sent into the aud- being presented by Play Produc-
itorium, rather than having the air 1 tion to make use of this novel
chilled by a refrigerating machine cooling system for other than its
which is the case in most theaters. original purposes. During last
The advantages of this method are week's play "Escape" there was one
evident in that the system is prac- scene in which a rope of fish ap-
tical even during the cold weather, peared on the stage, but Director
when the fresh air is heated be- Chester M. Wallace immediately ve-
fore being sent into the theater, [toed the suggestion of using the
and the spread of colds is pre- ventilators in this case to add real-
vented by the constancy of the ism. This week's play, which is a
fresh warm air. comedy, "Wedding Bells," does not
One odd advantage of such a offer the same possibilities, but the
ventilating system in a theater, one players are determined that they
which has not been made use of will waft some odors through the
as yet in the Lydia Mendelssohn theater before the season is com-
theator hut which has w Ioesnrre- noi lpt

PHYSICISTS MAKE
NEW SPARK PLUG
When the Ft. Worth made its
aeroplane endurance record of 172
hours at Ft. Worth, Texas, on May
29, under the guidance of PilotsI
Robbins and Kelly, one of the prin-
cipal elements in the successful,
performance was the perfect func-
tioning of the spark-plugs in the
huge Wright plane-and the per-
fecting of those spark plugs was
made possible through research
work in the scientific laboratories
of the University of Michigan.
Long before the record-breaking,
flight of the plane was planned, the
manufacturers of the particular
spark plug which was used in the
Ft. Worth asked the department of
engineering research of the Uni-
versity of Michigan to make forl
them a study of the variations inI
the voltage required to produce an
efficient electric spark in a spark
plug. This study in charge of Prof.1
O. S. Duffendack of the department
of physics, was carried out in the
physics laboratory of the Univer-
sity.
Miss Jean Van Coover, a native of
Pennsylvania, who recently arrived
in Washington, D. C., is the first,
American woman to penetrate the
wilderness of Afghanistan to its
distant and usually inaccessible
capital. She speaks five languages.

Bryn Mawr-A class of 110 open-
ed the Bryn Mawr summer school
for women workers. One-third of
the women enrolled are members
of trade unions, Canada, England,j
Germany, and Denmark being re-
*"presented. The school is supported
by voluntary contributions from
persons who believe in workers' ed-
ucation, and is one of four affil-
ilated summer schools which utilize
otherwise empty college buildings
for the education of industrial
workers.
Washington, D. C.-Thirty wo-
men in various parts of the coun-
try will act as hostesses at the,
Citizen's Military Training camps
this summer. Their time for 30
days will be devoted to making
camp life comfortable for the men
in training, and during this month
they will be an official part of the
army. Giving information and ad-
vice, arranging entertainments for
the evenings, and providing a
home-like atmosphere will be the
duties of the hostesses.
Flint-A magazine entirely de-
voted to the fine arts is being
founded by Evelyn Labinski, a
graduate of Flint Junior College.
The magazine will be the first of
its kind, and the project is being
assisted by Dr. Clarence Cook Lit-
tle, Dr. P. M. Jack, Mr. James
Schernerhorn, founder of the De-
troit Times, and Dr. Alvin John-
son, editor of the New Republic.
Miss Labinski is only nineteen
years old, but she has been plan-
ning the magazine since she was
twelve.

furnished home for summer or
for year. 332 E. Jefferson. Phone
6976. 14, 15
FOR RENT-Room. One single one
double room. 332 E. Jefferson.
Phone 6976. No. 14, 15
LOS'T
LOST-Black and tan police dog
with wound on right forearm.
Answers to name of Pittsburg.
Reward. George- Tremble, 512 So.
State. 11, 12, 13
LOST-Black and tan police dog
with wound on right forearm.
Answers to name of Pittsburg.
Reward. George Tremble, 512 So.
State. 11, 12, 13
LOST-Small black leather ad-
dress book. Return to Secretary's
office, University.
LOST-Ring of keys with J. L.
Hudson tag M-5026. Return to
Room 101, Tappan Hall, Univer-
sity or call 9801.
LOST-A seven by five black note-
book with some extra sheets in
I the pocket. Return to charging
desk at General Library for re-
ward. Lost about June 29.
LOST-Green Parker Pen before
the 4th on or near campus. Dial
8731. Reward. Near Eng. Bldg.
14, 16

x

Use This Colunm
Every Day

1 ullvauvl uuu Willt ll llaz, WvlrS-u z'uu-

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ACCUSE STUDENT TO STUDY FEVER
IN JEWEL THEFT A
i (By Associated Press)
(By Associated Press) EAST LANSING, July 11--Mich-
OKLAHOMA CITY, July 11.-i.gan State College, whose scientists
Alma Lee Couch, University of Ok- have contributed more than any
lahoma coed at Norman, was at others to the study of Malta fever,7
liberty on bond today following her will be the site of a continued ex-
arrest in connection with the theft perimentation in the control of the
last April of $2,000 in jewels from disease. Contracts recently were
a home here where she was employ-

signed between representatives of
the college and the United States
Department of Agriculture.
The Federal government has ap-
propriated $4,000 for the addition-
al study of the non-virulent cul-
ture for the immunization of cat-
tle from the disease, which is be-
lieved to be transmitted to humans
as malta, or undulant, fever.

Starts Today

ed as nursemaid.
Miss Couch's arrest Tuesday
brought business and reTgious lead-
ers of Norman to her aid. Jack Fos
ter, city councilman, and Charles
Richardson, a leading merchant,
signed her bond.
I

Subscriptions
TO
lw #ummr aI
Are Due July 17

A One Day Cruise over the Great international
Highway of Lakes and Rivers
BIg Str.n% 5 Tah mo
Come to Detroit and enjoy an outing on this popular excursion
steamer. Music and free dancing on shipboard, and quiet,
breeze-swept decks where you may sit in comfort and watch
the traffic of the Great Lakes and enjoy the beautiful scenery.
FAMOUS TASHMOO PARK
Six hours on the island for outdoor fun; quiet groves equipped for picnic
dinners, a large dancing pavilion, baseball diamonds, running tracks,
boating, bathing, and a fine 18-hole golf course.
PORT HURON, SARNIA, ST. CLAIR FLATS
RUSSELL ISLAND
Leavir g foot of Griswold Street, 9 a. m., every day, Steamer Tashmoo
sails past the eastern half of Detroit's great river front; along the shore of beauti-
ful Be'Je Isle and across the blue waters of Lake St. Clair to the United States ship
cans.. rand then through the wonderful St. Clair Flats, "The Venice of America,"
the',n~est fishing ground in the world and the varadise ofhunters~tlhcn on up the ma-
jesicSt.ClairRivertoSarnia andPortHuron. The ride of6l miles eachwayis through
a constantlycehangingpanoramaofrareland and waterviews. The Tashmnoo reaches
Port Huron at 2:00 p m. ,leaveaat 3:10 p in. and arrives back In Detroitmat 7:45 p.m.
FOR AN AFTERNOON RIDE
Take Str. Florida to St. Clair Flats or Tashmoo Park. Lv.1:30 p. rn. Return on Str.
Tashmoo, 7:45 p.m. SUNSET SPECIAL: Saturdays and Sundays. Lv. 2p.m. Return
7:45 or 10:15 p.m. Three hours at Tashmoo Park; four hours a St. Clair Flats; one
hour at Russell Island. 'Fare. Weekdays, $1 R. T. Sundays, $1.25.

J .
I
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s
e
U

C

a .

.33

ijY

r

Unpaid Subscriptions
Will Be Stopped

I

$

.44

This group includes sport
lines in all materials, woven
sandals and calf oxfords; real
values for a real sale.
All Sizes

EEmEEEEEEE.E.EE.

-1

'a ratT readings; . T. Railway, between Detroit and Port
IRailroad Tic et Huron are good on steamers either direction.

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Fares: Tashmoo Park or St. Clair Flats, weekdays, $1.00: Sundays, $1.25, round trip:
Port Huron or Sarnia, $1.10, one way; $2.00 round trip.

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:sue
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_._ .i\ ..t
-- ..

Dancing
Moonlights
TO
SUGAR
ISLAND
Every Night
at 8:45
Tickets 75c

r
r
i
a
I
i
I
i
k
3 t
I
i
I

CANOEING
Every Afternoon and Evening
Saunders' Canoe Livery
On the Huron River at the foot of Cedar St.

r r. r r. . r. r r r r. r. r. i, r, r r r. r r r. r. r r r r. r. . r r r r. i. rr r. i r r. i r. . r r r r r. r.

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Included in this group are
new styles just purchased at
a ridiculously low price .
white, blondes, patents and
all colorsregardless of previ-
ous price.
t'5

$

.55

New and plenty
priced to suit this
ing event . . . all
blondes including
line modes at this

hot but
value giv-
white and
all Jaque-
price.

DON'T MISS THIS EVENT
JPacobson
OPPOSITE THE "MICHIGAN"

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WH ITE STAR NAVIGATION CO. *ROFGISO'LDT.'A

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READ THE DAILY CLASSIFIEDS!

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