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July 09, 1929 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1929-07-09

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LAUS !~TWU

THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAIL\

TUESDAY, JULY 9, 1929

e umu11tr
Published every morning except Monday
during the University Summer Session by
the Board in Control of Student Publications.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news Pub-
lished herein.
Entered atethe Ann Arbor, Michigan,
postoffice as second class matter.
Subscription by carrier. $i.5o; by maill
$2.00
Offices: Press Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
LAWRENCE R. KLEIN
Editorial Director..........Howard F. Shout
Women's Editor ...........Margaret Eckels
City Editor.............. .Charles Askrea
Music and Drama FEditor.. R. Leslie Askren
Books Editor............ Lawrence R. Klein
Sports Editor............. Cadwell Swanson
Night Editors

Howard F. Shout
S. Cadwell Swanson
Charles Aski en
Assistants

Walter Wilds
Harold Warren
n
Francis O'Keefe
Ledru Davis
Margaret Harris
eilliam Mahey
Francis O'Keefe

Noah Bryant
Bernice Davis
Ross Gustin
Dorothy Magee
Ben Manson

Paul Showers

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
LAWRENCE E. WALKLEY
Assistant Business Manager........-..Vernor Davis
Publications Manager.................Egbert Davis
Circulation Manager............Jeanette Dale
Accounts Manager..............Noah Bryant
Night Editor-Charles A. Askren
TUESDAY, JULY 9, 1920
OVERARTICULATE MINORITIES
Two or three times a week
the press publishes a pronounce-
ment by some religious, political,
or social organization condemning
the smoking of cigarettes or the use
of rouge by women, or advising
the government to remedy the un-
employment situation or to enter
the world court. These expres-
sions of sentiment by isolated and
unimportant groups seem often-
times to verge on the ridiculous.
Any readers who happen to hold
an .opinion contrary to that ex-
pressed are practically never in-
fluenced to reconsider their own
stand on the question, and there
is some reason to think that it
lowers the dignity and position of
these organizations to make a
statement which is obviously not
within their province and which in
the last analysis can have little
influence on the general opinion.
Of course, it is true trat America
is controlled to a dangerous extent
by minorities, but it is also true
that a minority attempting to con-
trol the public opinion in a matter
with which it has no reasonable
connection is only wasting its time.
For example, a religious society
recently went on record at its an-
nual convention as favoring the
entry of the United States into the
world court. The connection be-
tween religion and the world court
seems rather remote. And it Is
also questionable whether a state-
ment disapproving of rouge and
lipsticks will have any effect on the
young things who use them.
All of these publications of opin-
ion are nothing more than propa-
ganda with all the smaller minor-
ities following meekly in the wake
of the larger; most of the religious
groups indorse unqualifiedly 'the
actions of the anti-saloon league,
and the farm associations stand
solidly and stolidly behind the
doings of the "progressive politi-
cians." These are merely examples
of minorities.
Of course, we repeat that if it
were of any benefit to Mrs. McGil-
licudy, who lives over on Cypress
Avenue, to know that the Amalga-
mated Celery Packers Association
protested violently against the
feeding of vodka to nine-months-
old infants, we would have no
objections to the publication pf
the opinion; but where lies the
benefit? It would seem much more
reasonable and constructive for the
celery packers to tell Mrs. McGil-
licudy the best method of serving
celery or of raising it. Otherwise
the association in question is mere-
ly giving vent to an inflated sense
of importance.
We suggest more constructive
and beneficial activities for all the
organized minorities in the coun-
try. -
AMERICA ON WHEELS
According to figures recently giv-

en out by the American Automobile
association, the army of tourists
that will stream over America this
summer will number 45,000,000.
'ethic ia . lar,. rnmber than wa

and brings up a number of serious
questions worthy of discussion.
The annual exodus from the
home town is increasing in impor-
tance. every year. It is no longer
an event exclusively for the weal-
thy to spend a few months at the'
seashore or in the mountains; it
has become a part of every aver-
age family's life. Whereas in for-
mer times even the shortest jour-
ney was a matter of great mo-
ments, requiring extensive prepar-
ations and months of planning, to-
day the wife and kids are uncere-
moniously hustled into the car, the
lawnmower shoved into the base-.
ment, and some remote part of the
country announced as the next
stop. In other words, long distince
travel has become an incident in
the lives of most people. All this
is having a tremendous influence
on Ameri'can life.
For example, sectionalism is dis-
appearing under the magic spell of
close contact. There can be little.
misunderstanding when alldiffer-
ences can be discussed face to face.
Increased feeling of national unity
is the result, and all lack of har-
mony yet remaining results only
from the strain of business or po-
litical competition.-
Again, this quick and easy trav-
elling is bringing relief from the
tense pressure of modern living. It
gives these 45,000,000 individuals an
opportunity to escape from the de-
bilitating routine of-their everyday
work; they see new and unfamiliar
places and come back with a great-
er interest in life. Even more than
the educational values of these
trips, the relief and leisure which
they give are perhaps the only in-
fluences tending to combat the
drift toward mechanization and
Smaterialism
To narrow the question down
somewhat, the immediate prob-
lems arising are those of good roads
and highway courtesy. The sum-
mer horde of automobile tourists
is the supreme test of the suffic-
iency of our highway systems. Have
we provided enough roads of pro-
per construction to take care of all
this travel ? Undoubtedly the neg-
ative will be proved this year as it
has every year in the past. The
appropriations for road improve-
ment and building will have
to become even larger than at pre-
sent to keep pace with the enor-
mous increase in motor transpor-
tation.
The matter of highway courtesy
-is hashed over about this time ev-
ery year, and it has been gratify-
ing to notice that motorists as a
class are gradually becoming less
selfish and more sporting in their
use of the roadways of the nation.
There is more care at crossings and
less of a tendency to claim all the
rights of the road. But the pro-
portion of accidents due to the
criminal carelessness of the small
minority who have not yet realiz-
ed the necessity for considerate
conduct on the road testifies to the
need for ever more rigorous en-
forcement of highway regulations.

{t
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0 0
Music And Drama 1
o 0
TONIGHT: A Recital by Pal-I
mer Christian, organist, Thel-
ma Lewis, soprano and Mrs.
Mayme A. Worley, in Hill Aud-
itorium, at 8:15 o'clock.
MORE HARANGUES OF HARRIET
Dear Josephine:{
I suppose you aren't the only one
who has asked cynical and skep-
tical questions about my great aunt
Harriet. Of course, I admit that it
is generally a difficult feat to es-
tablish contact with the spirits of
the other world. What you need
is intense concentration on the sin-
gle idea of communication, without
distraction. We usually retire into
the morgue to do that, I mean the
"cut morgue" where they store the
pictures of all prominent men they
expect to have die or become pres-
ident i~n the near future, and you'd
be surprised at the number of old
pictures we have of really promi-
nent men who haven't done either
yet. But when we get into the
morgue with the door shut and our
subjective egos begin to respond to
the stimuli (hmm, dun't esk), Har-
riet materializes very quickly.
As I told you before,- Harriet is
a spirit; by which I mean that she
is an electric current,mbutan eman-
cipated one, not bound by the bore-
dom of positive or negative poles.
This irresponsibility has its dis-
advantages, as Harriet has fre-
quently discovered. To show you
what I mean: Harriet calls Life
a short-circuit with matter. The
electricity that we know and use
constitutes only a small froction
of that contained in Mr. Einstein's
curved orange peel of time-space.
Harriet of course has free access
to all electric fields, and is ever
razzing me about the smallness of
my world, which she calls a barna-
cle on the keel of the Vast Infer-
red. When she was out in Holly-
wood this spring she made a tour
I of the movie studios.

TYPEWRITER
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Editorial Comment
MEN AND WOMEN IN COLLEGE
(From The Butler Collegian)
That grown men and women are
eager to improve themselves is re-
vealed by the tuitionoutlay for
extension and commercial educa-
tion which now exceeds fifty mil-
lions a year. An internationally
known professor who has had some
years experience in teaching both
boys and girls in a co-educational
college made the statement that
beginning with the prejudice as
against the feminine scholar, as
probably frivolous and lacking in a
serious purpose in education, he
has come to the exactly opposite
conclusion, that the only hope of
preserving the ideals of liberal ed-
ucation lies with the college girls.
It is probable that this present
conviction is extreme, as his orig-
inal prejudice was unjust. That
there are young men capable of
profiting intellectually by a college
education, most professors will
agree. But the testimony of this
professor to it belief in the serious
interest of women in scholarship
and culture is worth attending to.
He upsets certain traditions in the
course of his statement. One is the
supposed contradiction between
feminine attractiveness and intel-
lectual ambition. Another is the
dogma that the female sex is un-
changeably more conservative than
the male. Do not the brightest
coeds wears the latest and skimpi-
est fashions and are they above the
use of cosmetics? But they do
show a definite interest in widen-
ing their intellectual outlook and
in developing a real personality.
The male students, however, look
on college as a mere aid in train-
ing for a definite job in business

What suggested, the tour was the
recent development of the "talk-
ies," particularly that type which
transforms sound waves into light
waves, and then reorganizes these
into electric reproductions of the
original sound waves. It seems that
it is quite impossible so to insulate
the talkie devices so that some
electric impulses do not escape and
become lost in the race through
space. Some of these stray im-
pulses had come barging into Har-
riet on occasions when she was in
her immaterial state and had
worked a havoc that was far from
immaterial to her peace of mind.
Imagine having your frequency
split by a loose groan from "The
House of Horror!" Well this bom-
bardment of half syllables and in-
terjections finally became so an-
noying that Harriet decided to in-
vestigate.
It was quite a simple matter for
her to get access to the 'various
studios; what's to stop a frequency
from frequenting any place at all?
She was on the First' National lot
when "The House of Horrors," now
playing at the Michigan, was be-
ing shot. I asked her about the
scene where the dead chauffeur was
apparently dragged by some mys-
terious hand into a flaming hell. I
wanted to know more about this
Hell, since it was the first intima-
tion of its existence that I'd had.
That embarrassed Harriet. It
seems she had something to do
with that.
Now you know a movie lot is
mostly lights and a camera; the
floors are paved with light cables.
Harriet, wandering around, very
much disembodied, stumbled across
a light switch, which at once threw
her into a quandary, for if there
is anything that puzzles her it's a
switch-she can't seem to decide
between positive or negative forks.
Just then Louise Fazenda shrieked
in horror and poor Harriet jumped
blindly and was carried in a wild
ride down the current, dizzily cir-
cling through the transformer coils
which threw a permanent wave in-
to her blond hair, and then was
hurled, half embodied, half dis-
embodied, through the molecular
interstices of the carbons right on-
to the set. It was just at the mo-
ment when the taxi-chauffeur was
on trial before Satan-a scene that
is not shown at the Michigan. The
chauffeur was swearing, ,as taxi
drivers can, and Satan was taking
it all in before passing sentence.
Well, when they had developed
the reel it was discovered that just
as the driver had finished his
swearing Satan's hair went a glos-
sy white and curled into the finest
female coiffure you could imagine.
Just imagine that and write me.

i ;. ill

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