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July 09, 1929 - Image 1

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1929-07-09

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THE WEATHER
Same temperature; un-
settled conditions.

hr ummrr

~aiti

MEMBER OF THE
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

VOL. X, No. 13

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, JULY 9, 1929

PRICE FIVE CENTS

GERMANY WILL NOT
TURN MONARCHIAL,
POLLOCKDECLARES
IN TEN YEARS VANQUISHED
PEOPLE HAVE, MADE
RAPID RECOVERY
SOCIAL-DEMOCRATS RULE
Student of Government Believes
Nation Will Take Place as
World's Second Power
"Out of one of the greatest de-
feats in history, the German peo-
ple have recovered their not com-
plete, but partial health in the short
space of a decade," declared Prof.
James K. Pollock, Jr., of the politi-
cal science department' in speaking
on "The New Germany" yesterday
afternoon in Natural Science audi-
torium. "I only wish that the
United States would endeavor to
understand the German people, for
soon that nation will be the second
greatest state in the world, and
through that understanding we
may go down the pathway of in-
ternational peace."
Professor Pollock, who spent the
greater part of the academic year,
1927-28, studying the, conditions in
the new republic, stated that all
indications evidenced a most re-
mote possibility of the return of
the old monarchial regime.
There are now seventeen states,
many of them the powerful old po-
litical divisions, organized under a
progressive constitution providing
for a parliamentary form of gov-
ernment-with a president, but on-
ly as' a figurehead-and the real
power in .the hands of the Reich-
stag. The prime minister and his
cabinet must have control of a ma-
jority of the 490 votes in the as-
sembly in order to maintain them-
selves. From out of the large num-
ber of parties there are only nine
important ones, but for any group
to have a majority it is necessary
for coalitions.
Politically, the most powerful
party in Germany at the present
time is the Social-Democrat, the
radical party, at the Left in the
Reichstag. Throughout the seven-
teen states this party holds corre-
sponding influence. Holding 150
of the votes, this group controls,
the proceedings of the legislative
body and the government. This
fact, linked with the refusal of the
people in a referendum, in which
15,000,000 votes were cast, to re-
turn property' rights to former
reigning princes, would- seem to
preclude any chance for an early
restoration of the old order.
Gustav Stresemann, the leader of
the People's party, has, according
to Professor Pollock, the profound-
est influence on German policy to-
day.
Among the other parties repre-
sented in the Reichstag are the
Democrats, a small group of intel-
lectuals.

INEW COACH I
I-.-

Harry G. Kipke, who is the idol
of all Michigan football players,
being an All American team man
and one of the greatest punters
that has ever kicked the pigskin
for Michigan. In 1925 he was
captain of the football team.
UNIVERSITY To MAKE
VISIT OF FORD AIRPORT
Will Inspect Hangars, Landing
Fields And The Manufacturing
Plants And Laboratories
TO SEE BYRD'S AIRPLANE
A visit to the Ford airport, in-
cluding the hangars, landing fields,
manufacturing plant, and laborat-
ories will constitute the fourth ex-
cursion on the summer series. The
actual construction of the ltrge
tri-motored planes from the raw
material stage to the assemblage
of the plane will be viewed by the
party.
The airplane Byrd used in his
North Pole flight will be on display
at the factory, and also the Fokker
plane which the Detroiters Schlee
and rrock used in their globe trip.
These will all be leisurely inspected
with the assistance of a technical
expert, who will explain the intri-
cacies of mechanism and construc-
tion.
The hangar which is said to be
one of the best constructed in the
country, being of the contilever
type, supported entirely 4rom a
central pier, enables ships of any
wing spread to enter.
The long runways and landing
fields are exceptionally well laid out
and shoud give those taking the
trip a fairly adequate conception
of the large metropolitan airports
throughout the country.
The Stout Air Services provide
a sight-seeing trip and a 25 min-
ute airplane ride over Detroit
which may be enjoyed by any of
the party upon paymeilt of the
usual passenger fee.

REPETORY PLAYERS
TO PRESENT COMEDY
BY POULA R RQUST
IS THE SECOND PRESENTATION
UNDER DIRECTION OF
PROF. WALLACE
REHEARSE OTHER PLAYS
Salisbury Field Is Author of Play
Dealing with Comic Marital
Complications
Requests for a ridtous, rollicking
comedy have led to the production
of "Wedding Bells" by the Michi-
gan Repertory players for their
third offering of the summer sea-
son. Opening Wednesday night and
continuing throughout the week,
the play will be given at 8:15 o'clock
in the Lydia Mendelssohn theater
of the League building.
"Wedding Bells" will be the sec-
ond presentation of Play Produc-
tion directed by Prof. Chester M.
Wallace who established himself
with local theatergoers last week by
the work done on Galsworthy's
"Escape." Professor Wallace is
known as the foremost American
director of college productions.
Two and one-half hours of
laughing is guaranteed for this
comedy which opens with the mar-
riage of Reggie to the owner of the
dog which chewed his shoes that
he had left outside of his hotel
room door to be cleaned. Reggie
shortly catches the measles, and
complications set in. It is said that
the play met with hilarious suc-
cess in both London and Paris.
As one group of Repertory play-
ers is ready to present this offer-
ing, another is putting the finish-
ing. touches on next week's pro-
duction, and still a third group are
learning their lines for two and
three weeks in advance. The large
number of persons in Play Pro-
duction, and the wide variety of
plays given afford an opportunity
for each person to play a role.
HUMPHREYS TO TALK
AT ALL CAMPU FORUM
Summer students will have their
first opportunity to attend an all-
campus forum Thursday, July 11,
at 4 o'clock, in Lane Hall, under
the auspices of the Student Chris-
tian Association.
Assistant Dean W. R. Humph-
reys of the literary college, has
been obtained as speaker and his
subject will be "Religious Literat-
ure." After Dean Humphreys has
finished his lecture there will be a
discussion.
During the past semester these
forums proved successful. Practi-
cally every department of the
University was represented by a
'speaker at one of the ten which
were held at that time.

LUCIUS S IT.AE
MICHIGAN ALUMNUS,
I DIESINIDA AO S
GRADUATED IN 1870 AFTER
SERVING IN THE
CIVIL WAR
WAS ROOSEVELT'S FRIEND
In Early Eighties Was Prominentj
In The Civil Service
Reform League
Lucius Burrie Swift, widely known
Michigan alumnus, aged 85, died
Wednesday afternoon, July 3, at hisE
home, 716 East Fourteenth street,
Indianapolis.
Swift was known for.his activities
in behalf of a national civil service
reform movement. He was author
of "How We Got Our Liberties."
Born July 31, 1844, in Orleans
county, New York, he early learned
all the rudiments of soil cultiva-
tion. At the outset of the Civil
war, Mr. Swift enlisted in a New
York infantry regiment and later
served inthe artillery, being cap-
tured twice.
His first capture was by troops
of Stonewall Jackson in one of the
Shenandoah valley campaigns. He
was held nine weeks at Belle Isle.
After his second capture, he was
at Libby prison several days.
At the close of the war, Mr.
Swift entered the University of
Michigan and received his Ph.D.
degree in 1870. After graduation he
spent two years in a law office in

NAVALOFFICIAL_
CP-ARLES SFRANCIS A. DAMS
Who has been named by Presi-
dent Hoover as secretary of the Na-
vy has gained world renown as an
amateur skipper of racing yachts
who could trace his ancestry back
to two presidents in the early his-
tory of the nation.
M SCA TS CONCERT THIS EVENING
Organ, Voice Concert By Palmer
Christian And Thelma Lewis
Make Up Program
TO BE AT HILL AUDITORIUM
The third of the Faculty Con-
cert series concerts will be held

TRMR THEATEN
SUBURBAN HOMES

I! I LU U IULL.LU
VICINITY OF LOS ANGELES
DAMAGED BY TREMOR;
FOUR HURT
SHOCK LASTED 15 SECONDS
Wal' of Suburban School Caves In;
Pasadena, Glendale Escape
Quake's Main Force
(By Associated Press)
LOS ANGELES, July 8.-A strong
earth movement of several seconds
duration in Los Angeles and sub-
urbs within a radius of 30 miles
occurred at 8:45 o'clock this morn-
ing injurying four persons at San-
ta Fe and Oiltown and doing prop-
erty damage estimated at $50,000
at East Whittier, a suburb of this
city.
Although large buildings in Los
Angeles swayed several inches dur-
ing the tremblor and the city hall
tower was reported to have moved
backand forth some 12 inches, no
damage was done here. The quake
was reported extremely severe by
residents of the southwest section
of the city.
Coastline communities including
Long Beach, Hermosa Beach, and
Santa Monica felt the tremor more
than did the inland towns of Pasa-
dena and Glendale. At Long Beach
considerable excitement Wjais
caused, as it was the first quake
of any consequence that could be

then went to Laporte, Ind., where at 8:15 o'clock this evening in recalled there. Employees of the
he was principal and superintend- ! Hill auditorium and will be given Long Beach Press-Telegram were
ent of schools. In 1879 he came by Palmer Christian, University getting out the day's first edition
to Indianapolis. organist, and Miss Thelma Lewis, when the tremor came, and there
In 1881, when the Civil Service soprano, accompanied by Mrs. was a rush for extras. The shock
Reform League was organized, Mr. Mayme Worley. lasted for about 15 seconds.
Swift became allied with the move- Palmer Christian, who for the The Epicenter of the tremor ap-
ment and eventually became a past school year has been giving peared to be in Santa Fe Springs.
\ember of the council and a vice- an organ concert every Wednes- Those injured there were two chil-
president of the League. The day afternoon as a part of the dren, caught under a washing ma-
League was largely responsible for Twiligt Organ concert series, .will chinc overturned by the shock,
the passage of the Civil Service law play: Chorale Prelude on "Ein and two oil burners struck by
in 1883 which brought about revolu- Feste Burg ist unser Gott"-Hanff; objects falling from an oil der-
tion in civil service positions, and prelude - Clerambault; Sonatina rick. Two flowing oil wells were
ended the "spoils system." from the Cantata, "God's Time is stopped by the quake.
Swift became a close friend and Best"-Bach; Fugue in C Minor- A portion of the East Whittier
admirer of Theodore Roosevelt Bach. school wall caved in and the struc-
when the latter was appointed to Miss Lewis who has been a ture was shifted on its founda-
the civil service commission by teacher of voice in the University tions. Two residences there were
Benjamin Harrison. School of Music for the past year wi ?cked by falling timbers. Plate
will sing: Selections from Frau- glass windows in some Whittleil
ENGISHloll FR ML leinleibe and Leben cycle by, school: were smashed.
Schumann (a) Seit ich ihn ge-
sehen; (b) Der Ring; (c) Ich
kanns nicht fassen, nicht glau-
ben; (d) Er, der Herrlichste von 111
T DAllen.
After the intermission Palmer
"Dtermination of the temperat-' Christian,;will again play the organ KIGS U M T P
ure of the constituents of planets" offering: Prelude by Schmitt;
will be discussed by Prof. E. A. Tiaumerie - Strauss - Chriistian; (By Associated Press)
Milne of the University of Man- Tosetta, "Thou Art The Rock"-
chester, England, in his lecture on Mulet. Miss Lewis at this time LONDON, July 8.-The British
"Star Colors and Their Interpre- also will sing: "In Fountain Court" public, fresh from yesterday's
tation" at 5 o'clock this after- - Lemont; Moon Marketing - thanksgiving services for the re-
noon in the Natural Science Au- Weaver; Sylvelin-Sinding; Take covered health of King George,
ditorium. Joy Home-Basset. relapsed into a state of anxiety
The study of the composition ;_today when no fewer than five
of the sun by employing a spec- SAdoctors cancelled the monarch's
trascope will be discussed in order STcienCeosppie TO projected trip to the summer
to provide a basis for analysis of Education In Lecture palace at Sandringham. The post-
other planets. ponement was announced only

THIRTEEN FORE STE
TO STUDY TRE
Under the direction of Prof. Rob-
ert Craig, Jr., field work and class
instruction have been started at
Camp Filibert Roth, west of Mun-
sing, for 13 sophomores who have
finished their pre-forestry work in
the University Forestry school.
With Professor Craig is Professor
Shirley W. Allen, acting as instruc-
tor in two of the 'camp's three
oourses.
Through the courtesy of the
Cleveland Cliffs Iron Company, the
buildings of the company's' camp
156, located within the Mackinac
Purchase unit, have been obtained
for the use of the foresters, the
bunk house being used for a class
room as well as for sleeping quar-
ters.
Up to the present, field work has
mainly consisted of retracing old
section lines and the locating of
fire breaks in a practise plan forj
protecting the camp location.
Throughout the summer, a major
portionof the time will be occupied
with practise in estimating stand-
ing timber. constructing volume

RS ATTEND CAMP
EES AND MAP WOODS
cies of trees, and mapping forest
l lands. Some attention will be
given to fire prevention and sup-
pression practise and the planning
and construction of forest improve-
ments also, the Midway, Skandia,
and Trenary fire lookout towers
being within easy reach. It is like-
wise hoped that the boys may visit
the Land Economic Survey crew at

Fraternity Is Robbed
Of Rugs Sunday Night
Two large oriental rugs, valued at
$1,200, were taken from the Theta
Delta Chi fraternity house at 621
South State street some time Sun-
day night. The robbery was dis-
covered yesterday morning by the
house porter and was immediately
reported to the police departmentI
of this city who are now working
on the case.
The thieves entered through a
basement window and prowled!
about the house.
Cuncannon And ReedE
To Lead Discussions
The first of the three-day series
of lectures, sponsored July 9 to 11

I

Through a detailed explanation Prof. S. A. Courtis gave a lecture three hours before the royal party
of atomic dissociation at tem- yesterday afternoon in University was scheduled to leave London.
peratures around 10,000 degrees high school auditorium on "Sci- Public anxiety was only slightly
show the relation the color and entific AStudy of Educational Prob- lessened by the announcement
the temperature of various ele- i lems" which was illustrated by nu- that an ex-ray examination had
ments in the spectru mof a star. I merous lantern, slides. Professor been, carried out this afternoon,
The reasons for the blueness Courtis first traced the progress and that the King's general
of the sky and the red appearance made in scientific fields and then health was so good he was able
of the sun as it nears the horizon pointed out how the basic princi- to take his usual walk with Queen
will also be discussed. pies learned could be- applied. Mary in the palace grounds.
BASEBALL SCORES CLASSICS FOR SCHOOL CHILDREN TO BE
SHOWN AT UNIVERSITY HIGH SCHOOL
American League
Washington 5, 6; Detroit 4, 16. Books for boys and girls from mer session in order to satisfy the
Cleveland 5; Boston 2. pre-school to high school ages and request of parents and educators
Philadelphia 8; Chicago 2. of interest to parents, schoolmen, who have come to realize the pro-
New York 10; St. Louis 3. and teachers will be on exhibit blem of supplying young children
o o every Tuesday, Wednesday, and with a proper literary background.
1 DAILY TRYOUTS ( IThursday afternoon during July in The exhibit includes the classics
room 1203, University high school. and current classics.
Any students in the summer j The exhibition, which has re- The problem of enticing the chil-

MacMillan.
The taily routine of the camp!
begins at 6:30 o'clock, followed by
breakfast at seven and camp duty
and inspection afterward. Classes
begin at 8:15 o'clock, there being
two lectures each morning, with
the balance of the forenoon de-
voted to study or office work. Fieldj
work occupies each afternoon from
1 to 5 o'clock except on Saturday.
Wednesday the entire day is given
over to field work.-
Cordial cooperation with the
camp's activities has been assured
by the local Forest Supervisor Bar-
ker, of Munsing. "If help and
friendliness on the part of the local
people is an index of the successI
of the camp." says Director Crai1

by the Citizenship school of the I school who would like to work
fourth region of the League of Wo- on the Summer Daily editorial
men Voters, will be given at 9 or business staff may do so by
o'clock tomorrow morning at the i communicating with the Daily
Michigan League building. Miss | office at once. The value to
Edith Rockwood of Illinois will talk I be obtained in practical jour- I
on "League Business Methods." I nalism through this work can
The afternoon discussion will be- I not be underestimated. Pre-
gin at 2 o'clock, at which Prof. f vious experience, though de-
Thnma trPM nd v n, T ,, h n-_..l r i,.

ceived the hearty approval of Dr. dren to
J. B. Edmonson, dean of the school by the
of Education, and the faculty of up and
that school, will open this after- colored
noon. peal to
In an interview, Miss Edith courage
Thomas of the University library' Those
extension service explained thalt Summe
this exhibit has been sent about cularly

the books has been solved
attractive bindings, make-
illustrations. The ends and
pictures in the books ap-
the younger mind and en-
s a familiarity with books.
people attending the
r Session who are parti-
concerned with child edu-

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