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August 10, 1929 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1929-08-10

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PAGE TWO

THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILN

SATURDAY, AUGUST 10, 1929

PAGE TWO SATURDAY, AUGUST 10, 1929
rn-rn ~ U

UJipV 'rnrnniWHAT'S THE DATE?
According to the report of the
al National Committee on Calendar
Simplification, the major defects in
the present system are: the lack'
Published every morning except Monday ; of equality in the lengths of the
during the University Summer Session by{
the Board in Control of Student Publications. months, the fact that the months
The Associated Press is exclusively en-do not conain a whole number of
titled to the use for republication of al news weeks, and the fact that the days
dispatches credited to it or not otherwiso of the week shift each year to dif-
credited in this paper and the local news pub- feetdts h omte a
lifhed herein. ferent dates. The committee has
C-tered at the Ann Arbor, Michigan, worked out a simplified calendar in
postoffice as second class matter. which there are 13 equal months
Subscription by carrier. 2.; by snail of 28 days each. This plan was
Offices: Press Building, Maynard street, approved by 98 percent of 488 ofI
Ana Arbor, Michigan. those organizations in this country
EDITORIAL STAFF who answered queries concerning
Telephone 4925 their attitude on the, question. Of
Tthe 1433 organizations interviewed
MANAGING EDITOR 80.5 percent strongly favored cal-
MANAGING EDITOR endar simplificaion. The reasonsI

ftfftflttitlflfffifttlitlttl111iflfltfillfl
{ About Books SUNDAY
"They Stooped to Folly," by Ellen cSUNDAYE
Glasgow, 1929, Doubleday, DoranIS5(11S1
Garden City, New York.-$2.50. (By ; !tilititlfflil~lflititifitllltlfl ttf g
Courtesy of the Print and Book.
Shop) I1

Iiia

,ill

Fall Milinery
A new era is ushered in with this presen-

LAWRENCE R. KLEIN
Zditorial Director.........Howard F. Shout
Women's Editor.......... Margaret Eckels
City Editor ..............Chars Askren
Books Editor........... Lawrence R. Klein
Spots Editor...........S. Cadwell Swanson
Night Editors
Howard 2. Shout Walter Wilds
5. Cadwell Swanson Harold WarrenE
Charles Askren
Assistants

Ben Manson
Ross Gustin
Dorothy Magee
Paul Showers
Deirdre McMullan

L-dru Davis
Margaret Farris
William Mahey
Marguerite Henry
Rhea Goudy

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214

for this overwhelming support of
the simplification program are
obvious when the advantages of
the new arrangement are consider-
ed. Under the simplified system all
months have the same number of
work-days, Saturdays, and Sun-
days, and are directly comparable;
each month has the same number of
whole weeks, and fractions of weeks
are eliminated; the fixing of per-
manent dates for meetings, court
sessions, etc., is facilitated, and the
shifting of week-day names to dif-
ferent dates is avoided; periods of
earning and spending would be
coordinated and budgeting thereby
made simpler; all months will be
comparable without any adjust-
ment, a great amount of clerical
work eliminated, and split-week
payrolls dispensed with; the 13
monthly settlements during the
year would bring about a faster
money turnover, and the same bus-
iness could be handled with less
money; holidays would always occur
on the same week-day, Monday;
and a permanent, complete, and
scientific revision made.

BUSINESS MANAGER
LAWRENCE E. WALKLEY
Assistant Business Manager.......Vernor Davis
Publications Manager........................Egbert Davis
Circulation Manager..........Jeanette Dale
Accounts Manager..............................Noah Bryant
SATURDAY, AUGUST 10, 1929
Night Editor--S. Cadwell Swanson
MARKETS AND MEN
"I have tried to make money that

it might be an instrument of serv- ! It seems, in view of these ex-
ice," stoutly declared Bishop James tremely important benefits, that
Cannon, Jr., of the Methodist Epis- any religious or minor business
copal Church, South, in answering objections to the change are not
worth consideration. Expense and
the criticisms of his recent stock
market activities. Considering the trouble involved in the change
amounts which Bishop Cannon has would be slight as compared to the
advanced in the support of vari- ad e accruing in the future
ous political campaigns in his home as well as to those which would
state, his ideas of service would come into being at once. All dif-I
stat, hs ieasof srvie wuldficulties could be overcome if suf-
seem a peculiar one. But ignoring ficietpogreveesmndinest
this, the actuality of a changed at- ficient progressiveness and interest
titude on the part of a vast num- were shown by the general public
in authorizing the change. only
ber of our citizens toward stock the narrowest of principles and the
speculation is something of major' most reactionary and conservative
importance in tne economics of the motratoayadcnerai
United States. Bishop Cannon is of individuals could retard the de-
velopment of this project, and it
but one example-although his po- seems natural to expect the Amer-
sition makes him an interesting ican people, who pride themselves
one - of a general trend of busi- on being both the most scientific
ness activity in the country. and forward-looking of peoples, to
This changed opiion signifies agive their approval to what will
major sociological shift according certainly benefit the whole world
to many Wall Street brokers. Os- socially and economically. A world
tensibly the market has been stead-: conference to bring this matter to
ily rising with only minor fluctua- a head is assuredly the next step.
tions, but, as pointed out in The
Brache Review, it "is full of ab-
normalities and differences." Ac- Editorial Comment
cording to a recent Evening Post it
is demonstrated that ninety stocks LEISURE FOR READING
had risen thirty-six points, i LEr e FORREAING
amounting to an eighteen per cent (From The Daily Illini)
advance, since May 27. However, What appears to be a wise move
this rise has been accompanied by and one that could be profitably
a movement toward lower levels on copied by other publications is the
the part of a long list of individual decision of The Century to leave
stocks. "These are stocks," states the monthly field and return in
the Brache Review, "that were October as a quarterly.
bought by the public . . , The Today the individual who at-
public holders are still holding tempts to keep abreast of current
them, with ample margin, but with thought as found in the multiple
not much daylight ahead." publications which claim our at-
The only conclusion is that the tention must either possess re-
large financial interests have been markable discriminatory powers or
garnering large profits while the an extraordinary capacity for read-
smaller investors have been bal- ing. With our hourly newspaper
ancing the lists with their losses. editions, next week's periodical shot
All this has led to several unfavor- at us before this week's has been
able conditions from which there stripped of its wrapper, books
seems but one escape-to split open shouting for our attention, and
the market. As the situation now monthly magazines still operating
stands extremely high money rates on a 30-day schedule the average
are in effect which are affecting all reader finds himself swamped by a
other countries adversely. This is mass of reading matter.
certain to have its influence on the Today a month is not what it
economic prosperity of the United was before we stepped on the
States in time, and should cer- accelerator with such a heavy foot
tainly not be permitted to contin- that time is out of joint, and we
ue. However, as was pointed out just cannot find the time to do
above, the only way in which the reading in 30 days that we once
money rate can be lowered is by spread over two or three leisurely
forcing a heavy liquidation on the months.
market entailing grea losses. Complain as we may of the "speed
Going to the other side of the age," we can't find our way back
problem-the investors side- we to the leisurely days, and we
find the situation taking care of wouldn't if we could. It seems to
Itself. So strong is the desire of be our destiny to break the speed
the general public to "invest" on limit and we are apparently in love
the stock market, as did Bishop with our destiny.
Cannon, that the financial powers The Century's decision may start
are finding themselves hard put to! a break on the part of certain pub-
it to maintain their control. once lications that will see more uar-
they lose it, and the wider dis- terlies which a subscriber may read
tribution of stocks becomes a fact, at leisure and digest what he has
the plunge into a bear market is read before the next issue is in his
almost a certainty. The major mail-box .Certainly the conscien-
sociological shift, the change in at- tious reader today finds it practi-
titude toward market-trading as cally impossible to keep up with
a business, will then be bringing the output of good things and the
about an important economic change should gain the approval
change also. The financial vigor of those intelligent magazine read-
of markets and men, it would seem, ers who feel the need of keep-:

Are you interested in virginity?
Have you ever come right out in
[the open and asked yourself: What
is there in this chastity racket,
anyway? If you feel a glimmer of
concern about these matters, climb
up on the curb and get a hodful
of Ellen Glasgow: The philosophy
of purity discussed pro, con, and
who-gives-a-damn.
The book is subtitled "A Comedy
of Morals" and is dedicated "To
J James Branch Cabell . . . in ack-
nowledgement of Comething about
Eve. . . this book that commem-
orates the chivalry of men." So
you know right off what the at-
mosphere is going to be. That
crack about "the chivalry of men"
was made with tongue in cheek,
and a knowing wink at James
Branch. The book records the tol-
erance and sympathy of one man
for the fallen sisterhood (one slip
counts a fall) and the faith in the
double standard held by the bal-
ance of the male sex and most of
the other.
It's a good thing Mrs. Glasgow
called it a comedy--otherwise you
wouldn't know where to have her
and even now you're not sure; she
seems, occasionally, to be in such
deadly earnest. For instance:
"And out of this desolation, it
seemed to him that a burden of
futility poured like a shower of
ashes into his soul. 'What is the
meaning of it all?' he asked himself
despondently. 'Where is it leading-
What else is left in life after you
have had happiness?'"
When people begin to cry, "What
is the meaning of it all?" you feel
an itchy remnider of the Oh, God!
school of poetry.
Although the book deals to a
certain extent with those passion-
ate ladies who gave it its title, it
is concerned more directly with the
effect of these transgressions upon
Mr. Littlepage, a Southern gentle-
man. Mr. Littlepage, at 57, is, and
has always been, a faithful hus-
band and is appropriately named
Virginius. It takes place in Queen-
borough, Virginia, a city of high
ideals. The time is some five years
after the war--our war, not the
one between the states.
The first one who stooped to fol-
ly was Mr. Littlepage's "poor Aunt
Agatha," who slipped in the friv-
olous seventies and who had aton-
ed for it in the only way a South-
ern lady could by shutting herself
up in her house, "imprisoned in a
tradition.'
The second too-generous woman
was Mrs. Dalrymple, nearly of an
age with Virginius, and the Victor-
ian ideal of hour-glass pulchritude
if not of virtue. She accepted the
traditional fate of the fallen un-
complainingly but lightly. Ostra-
cism troubled her less than a
dearth of lovers. Despite Mr. Lit-
tlepage's high principles and his
L was as aptly denominated as he
spouse), he felt drawn to Mrs. Dal-
faithfulness to Victoria (yes, Mrs.
rymple.
Finally, there was Milly- Mr.
Littlepage's stenographer (only).
She is a girl congenitally dangerous
to men (though, as Mrs. Glasgow
would remark, why should men
need Safety First signs?) Seduced
and defiant she demands "the right
to live her own life." Her baby
came and died after her betrayer
had gone to France. He never knew
of the fruits of his passion. Milly,
of the new generation, wasn't the
girl to throw that up at him. But
she wanted him. The war was over,

she knew he was alive, but he had
not come back. Mr. Littlepage's
earnest, beautiful daughter, Mary
Victoria, had also tarried in Eur-
ope after the excitement, to re-
lieve and rescue the Balkans. Mr.
Littlepage wrote asking her to look
up Milly's deserter. A few months
later Mary Victoria returned, with
a husband as a surprise for her
family. You've guessed it: the
bridegroom was none other than
Milly's boyfriend. Mary Victoria
had see nher duty clearly-it was
to save him from himself and from
that unsuitable other woman. Im-
agine Mr. Littlepage's embarrass-
ment.
The style of the book is much
in the manner of "Juanita Tan-
ner's" The Intelligent Man's Guide
to Marriage and Celibacy, which is'
to say it reeks of G. B. S. Fast
ones like "American democracy, in
which the superiority of wives is as
firmly established as the divine
right of averages" are scattered lib-

10:30 A. M.-Regular morning
service. Subject: "Spirit."
11:45 A. M.-Sunday School fol-
lowing the morning service.
7:45 Wednesday evening testi-
monial meeting.
The reading room 10 and 11
State Savings Bank Building
is open daily from 12 to 5
o'clock except Sundays and
Holidays.

Hats that reveal eyebrows

. profiles

foreheads. Hats with more allure to the inch than
anything Paris has heretofore created. In felt

FIRST CHURCH OF
CHRIST, SCIENTIST

cated chic

. . crocheted wool . . .
all the smart autumn colors

silk fabrics

in

li

and at most

attractive prices.

a

11

~ ~ - - ~

. of daring lines

tation of Fall Millinery

FIRST- PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
Huron and Division Streets
10:45 A. M.-Morning Worship.
Rev. William H. Mason, D.D.,
Saginaw, Mich.

lI

I

00/f

era of sophisti-
. . . or vast
idea of brim

11

SECOND FLOOR

ingenuity. Hats that discard all

li

5:30 P.
young
House,
nue.

M.-Social hour for
people at theaChurch
1432 Washtenaw Aye-

6:30 P. M.-Young
Meeting.

People's

PRESENTATION
STARTING

CON REGATIONAL
CHURCH
State and William Streets
Allison Ray Heaps, Minister
SUND)AY, AUGUST 11, 1929
10:45--Sermon by Mr. Heaps.
Subject: "The Eternal Quest."
Last service of the summer.
The church will re-open Sep-
tember 15th.
FIRST METHODIST
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Corner S. State and E. Wash.
Rev. Arthur W. Stalker, D.D.,
Minister.
Rev. Samuel J. Harrison, Student
Director and Associate Minister.
10:30 A. M.-Morning Worship.
REV. P, RAY NORTON, Pastor
of First Methodist Church,
Adrian, will preach.
12 M.-Bible Class for Students
at Wesley Hall.
6:00 P. M.-WESLEYAN GUILD
DEVOTIONAL MEETING at
Wesley Hall.

UNUSUAL
TODAY

- I

and do unusual things with what is left.

a

The Greatest
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Personality on
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She risks her all for lovel
All he can give her is home, posi-
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wants love! She steals it! She
learns the joy and heartbreak
that love really is. And you will
thrill to the-
L REVELATION!

,'"
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...
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.
y. _ ks --
1
...!
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.,

Added
BIG BOY
in
"GINGER
SNAPS"
A Novelty Parisian
Wedding
Paramount News
Aesop's Fable

WT H
ESTHER RALSTON
ARCOPE ,.
a Qoramount iLue

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fred Newton Scott Anniversary pers
By
FORMER STUDENTS AND COLLEAGUES OF DR. SCOTT
A volume illustrative of the scholarship and broadly humanistic sympathies
of the man it was written to honor.
$5.00
WAKTUKZUIQ UNIVERSITY
VV~UA~~BOOKSTORE

II I

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