100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

August 03, 1929 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1929-08-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SATURDAY, AUGUST 3, 1929

THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

-- I

VIESWINS WAY TO
SEA-FINALS IN HOLLY
VALLEY NETTOURNEY
EMMETT PARE, CLAY-COURT
CHAMPION, ALSO WINS
TO SEMI-FINALS
DEFEATS FRANK SHIELDS
Michigan's Lone Woman Survivor Is
Eliminated from Play by
Mrs. Andre Russell
(By Associated Press)
PONTIAC, Aug. 3.-A slender 18-
year-old California lad with a pow-
erful background drive and uncan-
ny ability to nick the lines advanc-
ed to the semi-finals of the Michi-
gan State Tennis tournament at
Holly Valley Country club Thurs-
day afternoon.
In a thrilling five game set Ells-
worth Vines of Pasadena, eliminat-
ed Frank X. Shields of New York,
national junior champion and
tenth ranking player in the United
States, from the running for the
Michigan singles title. Scores of
the match were, 6-4, 2-6, 4-6, 6-3,
6-4.
Vines' ability to play the lines
enabled him to wear Shields down
in the first three sets and then go
on to victory.
Emmett Pare, national clay court
champion, also advanced to the
semi-final round, by defeating
George Jennings, Illinois state
champion, 6-2, 5-7, 7-5, 6-4.
In the lower bracket, Fritz Mer-
cur, seventh ranking player in the
country, won from George O'Con-
nell in straight sets, 6-4, 6-2, 6-4.
Fred Royer, Missouri state cham-
pion, is the other semi-finalist, win-
ning from Walter Martin, 19-17, 6-2,
6-3, The first set established a new
record for the Michian champion-
ship so far as length is concerned.
In the quarter-finals of the wom-
en's singles, Miss Katherine Wolf
of Indianapolis, won from Alice Al-
ger of Milwaukee, 6-1, 6-3, and will
meet Ruth Oexman of Cincinnati,
in the semi-finals. Miss Oexman
defeated Mary Zita McHale of Dal-
las, Tex., 6-3, 6-3.
. Miss Carolyn Swartz of San Fran-
cisco, won from Muriel Adams of
Indianapolip, 6-2, 3-6, 6-2, while
Mrs. Andre Russell of Cleveland,
eliminated Michigan's lone sur-
vivor, Miss Ruth Reis of Saginaw,
6-1, 6-3. '
YEAR'S UNION RENOVATION
PLANS TO COST $25,000
Improvements representing an
investment of $25,000 will have been
made at the Michigan Union dur-
ing the year ending September 30,
it wassaid today by Manager Paul
Buckley. The improvement pro-
gram of this year is perhaps the
heaviest since the structure was
built.
The second, third and fourth
floors of the building are being re-
finished, together with the tap

room. All furniture is being- put1
in good condition and a considera-I
ble amount of new fixtures are be-
ing added.
Much of the plumbing has been
replaced by new fixtures. This and
other work which does not appearf
on the surface already has been
completed at a cost of $15,000.
Haggerty Goes Fishing
(By Associated Press)
LANSING, August 2-John Hag-
gerty, secretary of state, is "upr
north," fishing today for what ist
said to be the first time in 231
years. He is with Gov. Fred W.
Green and Justice W. W. Potter of7
the supreme court.

Music For Hospitals
Advocated By Soprano FASTEST PLAYER
"Every hospital should have a!
music staff as a secondary adjunct
to the treatment of the ill," Anita.
Tully, American soprano, has de-
clared. Miss Tully has combined
her musical career with scientific
investigation in a hospital labor-
atory.
Miss Tully has made numerousc
analytical studies of the effects of
music upon sick and convalescents
patients, both in medical and phy-
sical cases. She has reached the
conclusion that in the matter of
mental diseases, music is of im-
mediate value, contributing by itss
influence to the recovery of the pa-
tient. IN. the matter of organic
disease, she has not yet determin-
ed the value of the use of music,
but explains that as a secondary
factor, music serves as a means of
distracting attention from pain.
Miss Tully intends to devote her
attention to arousing interest
among medical fraternities as to
the value of the placing of musi-
clans on hospital staffs. She is con-
fident that she will be succsful.
Musicians in hospitals would ne-
cessarily have to work in complete
cooperation with physicians and in-
ternes, according to Miss Tully's 'M
plan. Thus, by a thorough study
of each case, the practicability of1
combining musical with medicale
treatment would be ascertained.
During the summer, Miss Tully is Joe Vance
engaged in conducting an experi- Baseball player of Rocky Mount,
ment in musical therapeutics at the N. C., who is credited with recently
Belleview hospital, one of the larg- circling the bases in 13 seconds flat.
est in America. She will return to Vance, a Texan, wears his cow-
recital work in October. puncher's outfit when not on the
fball field.
STUDENTS GO ON -
PUT-IN-BAY TRIP NEWS FROM
Large Group Expected to Leave at OTHER COLLEGES
Early Hour This Morning for
All Day Journey 1
CHICAGO. -Cornelius Osgood,
The Put-in-Bay excursion train 23-year-old Chicago explorer, has
in the form of a special interurban
will leave the city this morning at proved himself the first white man
the early hour of 6:30. Provision to be successful in living among
has ben made for the accomoda- the truculent Hareskin Indians.
tion o fa large crowd which it is I Osgood left for the inner Arctic
expected will approach that of last circle a year ago to make obser-
year, when 180 students made the vations of these natives for the
trip. To date less than half thatj
number have signed up, although purpose of acquiring material for
a last minute rush is expected. hi masters thesis in anthropology.
Pleasant weather and the proxim- He expects to return in August.
ity of examinations should swell
this number appreciably. INDIANA.-Over-weight students
For the trip to the Island a spe- and citizens of Bloomington are to
cial rate is granted by the steam- have an opportunity to reduce with
ship company to parties of more
the help of the University cafeteria
than 100 persons and it has also
been announced that individuals beginning August 10, when special
possessing unused through railroad trays will be prepared according to
tickets may have these honored by the famous Eighteen Day Diet,
the company. guaranteed to help anyone reduce.
The outing itself will consume Scales will be provided to enable
the whole day, arrangements hav-
ing been made for varied enter- the dieters to check up on their
tainment to supplement the boat losses, which will be a gain to them.
ride and the luncheon on the Is- This diet, popularly known, as the
land. There will also be the usual "Hollywood Diet", and supposed to
amusement regularly enjoyed by have been prescribed by the Mayo
ecursionists, including dancing on Brothers for Ethel Barymore at a
the boat during the afternoon and cost of $500, is one which proposes
golfing and bathing at the islad. to reduce without depriving the
The Put-In-Bay caves and the Per- subject of nourishing food. Its in-
ry monument will also command troduction is expected to add zest

the interest of many members of to the last listless weeks of summer
the party. school.
EFFINGER ON VACATION INDIANA.-Sixty Indiana girls

i

After Touchdown Point
Unimportant At Iowa
IO (Special To The Daily)
IOWA CITY, August 2-The try-
for-point after touchdown, subject}
of much controversy in the gridiron1
world, has affected the final result
of only three games played by Un-
iversity of Iowa football teams in7
forty years.
This comparatively insignificant
part of the one-point attempt in
the entire history of Hawkeye foot-
ball has been discovered after a
search of the records in the de-;
partment of athletics.
One of the trio of. games was the
contest with Minnesota on Iowa
field last October. Each team scor-
ed a touchdown in the fourth quar-
ter, Minnesota with Fred Hovde's
90 yard run; Iowa with Oran Pape'sj
65 yard sprint. The Gophers, how-
ever, failed to achieve the extraI
point on a place kick attempt. Irv-,
ing Nelson, sophomore substitute, I
made his sole but important play
of the game when he cooly drop-1
kicked the ball between the goall
posts for the winning point.
It was in 1909 that victory or de-
feat hinged upon, the try-for-point
in the other games. Missouri scor-
ed two touchdowns and kicked one
goal for thirteen points, but Iowa
could make neither goal after a
pair of touchdowns, and lost, 13 to
12. Another Missouri Valley team,
Nebraska, could have beaten the
Hawkeyes with the point after
touchdown, and Iowa could have
beaten the Cornhuskers. Both at-,
tempts failed, however, and the 6
to 6 deadlock was the final re-
sult.
UNIQUE REQUESTS
FOR JOBS FILLED
Student Employment Bureau An-j
swers Many Peculiar Job l
Requests at Wisconsin

SOVIET OFFERS PLANT
FOR11RAIL OPERATION:
CHINA-MUST APPROVE;
MANCHURIAN HEAD S I L E N T
ON SOVIET PROPOSALS
TO NAME OFFICERS
SOVIET NAMES MANAGERS
Russians List Three Conditions for
Arbitration; Railroad
Status Changed
(By Associated Press)
MOSCOW, Aug. 3.-The Soviet
union government, taking its first
public notice of quasi-official efforts
to reach a peaceable settlement of
the Chinese Eastern railway con-
troversy with China, today an-
nounced three drastic conditions as'
a solution of the problem raised by
Chinese seizure of the railroad.
The conditions were:
1. Liberation of Soviet work-
ers and civil service men held
in Manchuria.
2. Appointment by the So-
viet government of both man-
ager and assistant manager of
the disputed railroad.
3. A conference, to be called
immediately, for negotiating
questions arising out of the
conflict.
In addition, it was said both
China and Russia would have to
agree to admit that the status of
the railway has been changed as
a result of its seizure, and subject
to further change in accordance
with the Peking and Mukden
agreement.
Themconditions were made pub-
lic in a foreign office statement
which listed in detail conversations
between B. N. Melnikov, former
consul general at Harbin, and Tsai
Yun-Sheng, Manchurian commis-
sioner for foreign affairs.
The negotiations apparently be-
gan July 22, and continued until
July 2, when Chang Hsueh Liang,
governor of Manchuria, remained
silent on a proposal that the Soviet
government name both manager
and assistant manager for the rail-
road.
L. M. Karakhan, vice commis-
sar for foreign affairs in the Soviet
union government, said there was
no prospect of settlement of the
conflict except on the basis of Chi-
nese acceptance of the stipulations.

.. .

L.ASSI FIE1Q'
ADVERTISING.LR
TYPEWRITING AND MIMEO-
GRAPHING promptly and neatly
done by experienced operators at
moderate rates. College work a
specialty since 1908. E. D.
O. D. MORRILL
17 Nickels Arcade
THE RAGGEDY ANN BEAUTY
SHOP OFFERS A
Marcel at 75c; Finger wave at $1.00;
Permanent wave at $8.50. Dial 7561.
MACK TUTORING AGENCY
Open for Summer school
1 310 S. State St. Phone 7927
TYPING DONE-English, French,
German, or Italian. Mrs. F. F.
Isbell, 426 S. Division. Phone
6946. 32, 33, 34, 35, 36
1 TYPING-Theses a specialty. Fair
rates. M. V. Hartsuff, Dial 9387.
FOR RENT
FOR RENT-Forest near Hill; 14
rooms party furnished. 3 baths.
Double garage. Phone 5740.
FOR RENT-Large one-room com-
pletely furnished apartment for
two girls or young couple. Also
newly decorated double for girls.
422 E. Washington. Dial 8544 or
9714.
FOR RENT- Unfurnished apart-
ments-upper and lower. Southeast
section. Modern. Call 5929.
LOS?
LOST-Orange Sibraffer fountain
pen in main library, July 29.
Leave at library desk or call
21456.
LOST-Gold ring with brown tiger
eye cameo setting. Reward. Call
Mary Kaufman 8817. 31, 32, 33
LOST-On State street between
Huron and M. Hut, gold pin
valued as heirloom. Reward.
Phone 21566.
LOST-A brown notebook with im-
portant notes and two letters
with a brown pocketbook. Re-
ward. Call 4918.
LOST-Dickinson's Excursions in
Musical History. Phone 6654.
Reward. 1217 Baldwin.
WANTED-At once, an agre'rive
salesman for new business. Ex-
cellent opportunities for a pro-
ducer. For information and in-
terview write, Box 209.

;'s
; .
l
3
E
,
:
;
,,.<:RE
.;;;
. .
ih
Y.
M.T
,..... R - .
a t :
Y
k. . ..... _
'J, -.. %
d'
Le.ยข
a ,;
3
..-: Rd.
k ,s
3
g
l

'%
i
i

III

i

Answering unusual questions is a
part of the day's work for the Stu-
dent Employment office of the Uni-
versity of Wisconsin, which each
year aids in finding work for about
one-third of the students enrolled.
Such tasks as finding someone to
wash the dog, or to mend a child's
broken toy are not infrequent.
Requests for students who will
give blood transfusions are among
the most unique cases. Still other
clients desire tutors for highschool
and grammar-school children. Last
fall, a request was made for a stu-
dent who would watch a house on
Hallowe'en night. Another odd re-
quest was for a man toy stay in an
undertaking establishment at night.
Most of the jobs done by students
are of the usual type, however. Miss I
Alice V. King, superintendent, re-
ports waiting on tables as the typeI

!i
1
J

of job which men students do most
requently. Working in homes and
doing stenographic work are prob-
ably the most usual occupations of
women students.
Nearly half of the men students
and somewhat less than a third of
the women students earn a part or
all of their way through the uni-
versity, according to data compiled
by Miss King.
Figures kept over a period of
about two years show that among
men students who do outside work,
45 per cent are earning all funds
required to put them through theE
university, 34 per cent are earningI
half of their way through, and 21!
per cent are earning less than half
or only a small part of their way.
Among women students who do
outside work, 35 per cent are earn-
ing all their way through the uni-
versity, 23 per cent half of their
way, 27 per cent less than half of
their way, and 15 per cent only a
small part of their expenses.

REPRESENTATIVES TO SEEI
LAUNCHING OF CAR FERRY
(By Associated Press)
MANITOWOC, Wis., Aug. 3.--
Michigan lakeport cities will be
well represented here at the launch-
ing and christening of the new)
Pere Marquette carferry "City of
Saginaw," next Tuesday.
Miss Ann Burr Tausend, daugh-
ter of Mayor Tausend of Saginaw,
will christen the new steamer. a
Invitations have been sent to
representative citizens of Saginaw,
Ludington, Bay City, Detroit and
Milwaukee, Wis., to be present at
the ceremony. A special train will
carry parties from the eastern side
of Michigan to Ludington where a
special carferry will take them
across Lake Michigan.
The "City of Saginaw" anl its
sister ship which will be launched)
in September will cost approximate-
ly $2,500,000. They will be the first
carferries to be equipped with the
turbine electric drive. They are
expected to develop from 18 to 20
miles per hour. Each boat will
have a draft of approximately 16
feet. They are designed to carry 30
42-foot freight cars.

TYPING

FOUND-A ladies' gold wrist watch
in the library. Owner can have
same by identifying it, and pay-
ing for this ad. Call 6641.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE-Canoe in good condi-
tion. Price reasonable. Call 3569
for information.
FOR SALE-A 7-passenger '25
'Marmon touring car. Excellent
condition. Very cheap. Mrs.
Harold Trosper, 924 Baldwin.
Telephone 9824.

Want Ads Pay

Dean John R. Effinger of the lit-
erary college left Ann Arbor today
on a vacation trip which will prob-
ably keep him out of the city un-
til Sept. 20.
He will spend August visiting
Glacier National park, Yellowstonel
park, Boulder, Colo., Cody, Wyo.,
and other points in the West. Re-
turning from the West, he will con-
tinue on to New York and the Ad-
irondack mountains, there to join
his family for a two or three weeks'
stay.

have received appointments to en-
ter the Indiana University training
school for nurses at Indianapolis
in September, according to a recent
announcement. The young- ladies
will first take a preparatory course
consisting of theoretical work-lec-
tures, classes, and practical demon-
strations. At the close of this term
the applicant becomes enrolled as
a pupil nurse, receiving two and
one-half years of training. Full
time duty will follow this, leading
to the diploma of a graduate nurse.

TYPEWRITERS
RIBBONS_
SUPPLIES
for all makes of
Typewriters.
Rapid turnover, fresh stock, insures
best quality at a moderate price.
0. D. MORRILL
17 Nickels Arcade Phone 6615

nnimmmmmm 1111111111 Ill 1111111111111111111111111 11111111111 1111111m a

You Get the Best
in
SERVICE AND QUALITY
~ata
I'E DEN
MIN I
Ann Arbor's Original Sandwich Shoppe
Onen Every Day Seven Till Midnight

University of Michigan Plays
By
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN STUDENTS
With introduction by Prof. Louis A. Strauss and edited by Kenneth Thorpe
Rowe of the University of Michigan.
*.
R UNIVERSITY
WAH BO KSTORE

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan