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August 03, 1929 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1929-08-03

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PAGE TWO

THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAIL

SATURDAY, AUGUST 3, 1929

Published every morning except Monday
during the University Summer Session by
the Board in Control of Student Publications.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news pub-
lished herein.
2$ntered at the Ann Arbor, Michigan,
postoffice as second class matter.
Subscription by carrier. S .So; by mail'
$2.00
Offices: Press Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone45...
MANAGING EDITOR
LAWRENCE R. KLEIN
Editorial Director..........Howard F. Shout
Women's Editor ...........Margaret Eckels
City Editor..... .............Charles Askren
Books Editor............ Lawrence R. Klein
Sports Editor..........S. Cadwell Swanson
Night Editors
Howard 2. Shout Walter Wilds
S. Cadwell Swanson Harold Warren
Charles Askren
Assistants

ATHLETICS FOR ALL
The Athletic association of the
University of Michigan merits a
virile slap on the back for its main-
tenance of the Ferry Field tennis
courts free of charge this summer.
During the course of previous
Summer Sessions the association
has fixed a fee on the privilege of
using the courts and in many cases
it has been prohibitive and not a
little inconsistent with the associa-
tion's policy of "Athletics for All."I
What is even more gratifying
than the "open gate" policy at
Ferry Field is the extensive and
really beneficial and actual pro-
gram of intramural athletics put
into operation by Paul Washke, as-
sistant director of intramural ath-
letics;.
The enrollment of the Summer
Session, composed as it is for the
most part of older than "of age"
students, wants the term for a play
period as well as a two month ses-
sion of graduate study. The sys-
tem - developed in athletics this
summer concords exactly -7ith this
desire.

Ben Manson
Ross Gustin
Dorothy Magee
Paul Showers
Deirdre McMullan

L'ndru Davis
MargaretuHarris
William Mahey
Marguerite Henry
Rhea Gondy

BUSINESS STAFFj
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
LAWRENCE E. WALLELY
Assistant Business Manager............Vernor Davis
Publications Manager ................. Egbert Davis
Circulation Manager............ Jeanette Dale
Accounts Manager.............................Noah Bryant

I Editorial Comment

i

'SHAFTS OF IRONY?

Schoolma'ams Not Ridiculed
Ethel Max Thinks

as

(From The Daily Cardinal)
Ethel Max, a sort of Al Smith

SATURDAY, AUGUST 3, 1929 reporter covering sidelights "all
Iaround the town" in the Capital
Night Editor --HOWARD SHOUT. Times on Thursday, pointed out
COOLIDGE CONDEMNS that "everybody from college hum-
MINORITIES orists to our own E. L. Meyer has
Said Calvin Coolidge in a rcn been focusing shafts of irony at
article in the American Magazine, the schoolma'ams at the university
"Congress is subservient to organ- summer school." Miss Max then
ized minorities." The former pres- goes on to say, "Just the same, it
ident then added that lobby-pro- isn't all summer school romance or
duced legislation "is excessively ex- spinsterish pursuit of degrees that
pensive." It is gratifying to find draws this annual horde to the
that Coolidge is not to fade alto- Madison campus."
gether out of public life. His po- The human interest appeal of
sition as a former chief executive, "the certain, sweet-faced woman
his experience in politics, and the whose hair has grayed in the serv-
absence of any responsibility to in- ice of a small Wisconsin high
hibit his utterances now, give him school" was good. We bow before
a place of power and influence as the glory and philanthropy of pur-
an impersonal and helpful observer pose which are a part of the lives
and critic of the Washington scene. of these unselfish servants of man-
It has been believed for a num- kind. We have nothing butt re-
ber of years that congress and, in spect, out of memory of our own
fact, the whole federal government reading, 'riting, and 'rithmetic days,
were dominated and controlled by for the inspiration and help given
strong, organized minorities. The the coming citizens of the world
extent of this domination has been by schoolma'ams.
pointed out by such investigators But we are amused by some of
as Andre Siegfried and Isaac Ma them. Not, mind you, by the fact
rosson, but the statement by the that they are teachers, but rather
former president gives an added that they have mistaken the sum-
basis of authority to it. mer school fellowship as a place to
The power of organized minori- j assert pedagogical authority and
ties in America has grown strong- "digmty" which amounts to aloof-
er year by year. Popular sovereign- ess. We have smiled at the foibles
ty has become almost a myth, over- and fancies of some of them, just
shadowed as it has been by the as we have smiled at the eccentri-
cities of undergraduates enrolled
mountainous bulk of the associa- in the summer session.
tions." Political, religious, econom-
ic, social, private societies by the A county superintendent of schools
sc ,xprndte logetarm by thewas introduced to another fellow
score extend the long arm of mi- Iof the summer session with the
nority influence into the halls o h ume esonwt h
o n nly t Wsha -ls words, "You'd never think he was
government not only at Washing a college professor, would you?"
ton but also at the capital of every The superintendent said that he
state in the union. They are the thought the introducee was an un-
forces that can shift the election dergraduate. He even admitted
tide either way they will, and pol- that the young fellow didn't look
iticians are made statesmen and nor act like a professor.
back again into politicians at the All of which brings up the ques-
whim and command of these mi- tion, "What does a teacher look
nority organizations. like?" Or again, "How does a pro-
Their power comes to them not fessor act?" Well, if he has lost
alone from their ability to shift the human touch, he looks like a
the balance in favor of this or that shell-shocked soldier a hundred
individual or principle by voting miles away from a tailor shop just
strength, but also in their ability after a week-end drunk. If he has
to mould the public opinion to suit mistaken his professional atmo-
their desires through the mediums sphere for a sort of army camou-
of the press, the radio, the speak- flage base, he acts like a Greek god
ers whom they hire, and through trying to snub some poor rela-
a hundred devious, underground tions, or a fish looking with disdain
pathways. at a fishhook after having seen a
They work in the centers of gov- ship anchor at close range.
ernment as lobbyists combining Dignity, we believe, is a quality
themselves as they can to best of the soul, a set of the mind. It is
force through the legislation or ad- not necessarily shown by the car-
ministration which they desirejriage nor the outward signs which
They threaten and cajole the of- the expressions of the face convey
ficers of state until their wishes to the public. Nobility of purpose
are satisfied. And while they are does not require that a man dress
not the "cut-worms to political in sackcloth and ashes or look like
growth" which they have been call- an underpaid janitor.
ed, they are influences and powers The most dignified man we ever
that are certainly not working for met was the least auspicious per-
the general welfare of the people son from the standpoint of appear-
as the government which they at- ance. He never tried to assume a
tempt to guide is supposed to do. look of wisdom nor an expression
The pernicious effect of their work' of dignity. He had a lot of fun in
costs the nation millions of dollars the world just being himself. He
a year in wasted administrative ef- never taught after any set formula,
fort and in wrongly directed legis-. but he made the students love his
lation. They are, as Coolidge point- subject because they loved him. He
AAA lit1 ' "AYP lgiVAI A3ln? p"t 41- 0 A. ;, . .. «...S - -..-a ,..

About Books
PROUST, THE TELESCOPE
(From "Time")
Marcel Proust has been calleda
human microscope. He called him
self a human telescope, prying int
people's hidden motives for genera
psychological laws. Also he isa
notable as a writer of varied bu
disconcerting style due to the ex
treme length of some of his sen
tences. To enjoy Proust is to b
impressively bookish. Accordingl
Proust is a favorite among poseur
as well as purists.
In his bed, Hypochondria Prous
used to wear a long night-gown
sweaters, mufflers, stockings, glove
and a night-cap. He lived on th
Boulevard Haussmann in Paris, i
a cork-lined attic room. His cur
tains were drawn against the tre
dust he found obnoxious. The sme:
of perfumes, flowers, steam hea
oppressed him unbearably. Only a
3 a. m., when breathing was easies
for his asthma, would he ventur
into the street. In a drawing roo
he would not doff his fur-lined coal
Once someone entered his hous
from several flights below, leavin
the street door ajar.. Quavere
Proust: "Shut that door!"- an
died. Author Proust, woman-rear
ed, was olive skinned, black haired
heavy eyed, and slender.
Life of Great Salvationist
In anticipation of the hundredt
anniversary of the birth of Gener
al William Booth, which the Sal
vation Army in America will cele
brate on next October, Willian
Hamilton Nelson has writtena
sympathetic life of William an
Catherine Booth entitled "Bloo
and Fire: General William Booth
which will be published in Septem
ber. Mr. Nelson served with th
Salvation Army for thirty year
Supernatural in Early Times
Dr. Shirley Jackson Case, of Chi
cago University Divinity School, i
spending the summer in Nova Sco
tia after completing his new boo,
"Experience with the Supernatura
in Early Christian Times," to b
published in the fall.
Dr. Sheen Called to London
Dr. Fulton J. Sheen, of the Cath
olic University of America, saile<
for London recently where he wil
deliver a series of addresses i
Westminster Cathedral. This is th
second time Dr. Sheen has bee
called to speak at the Cathedral
He is the author of probably th
most popular Catholic book of th
current season, "The Life of Al
Living," published by The Centur
Co..
Grand Duke Alexander to Returi
in the Fall
Alexander, Grand Duke of Rus
sia, who was here on a lecture tou
last year, will return for a more ex
tensive tour this season under th
management of Lee Keedick. Hi
tour during the past season wasa
great success and he has returne

to France for the summer. Hi,
book, "The Religion of Love," way
published during his sojourn here
Stickfuls
* * * Gordon MacCreagh, autho
of "The Last of Free Africa," is nova
on his way back from Abyssinia
He promises to tell all regardinE
the diplomatic pressure from cer
tain European powers which forcec
him to resign his leadership of th(
American Museum of Natural His
tory expedition to Abyssinia.
* *
* * * The American Opera Com
pany has just announced that Cal
Young Rice's poetic drama, "Yo
landa of Cyprus," with a score b3
Clarence Loomis, will be featuret
as the leading American opera ir
its repertoire next season. This pla:
is published in Mr. Rice's book, "Se-
lected Plays and Poems."
* *
* * * Vera Caspary, whose novel
of backstage life, "Ladies ant
Gents," is to be published by Cen
tury on August 16, has just sold he
first play to Crosby Gaige, produce
of many Broadway successes. It i
called "One Beautiful Evening" and
uwill he nresented n Broadway next

llltilillgliltliiliillllilll1lilil11l
SUNDAYF
S NAYou must Judge a Bank by
SSERVICESTHE SERVICE IT RENDERS
a We want to be judged on that basis
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN and invite you to use our facilities
1 CHURCH
a, Huron and Division Streets
it 1ir.An.i Arbr mart sank
- 10:00 A. M. Student Class. Main Office, Northwest Corner of Main and Huron Sts.
10:45 A. M. morning Worship. Branch Office, 707 North University Ave.
e Rev. James J. DeKraker, D.D.,
Y, Big Rapids, Mich.
s 5:30 P. M . Social hour for young t tlllll llll llll lllll iliil lllli l ilili illitiit llilli lillll 11111 1
people.
it Th _-~~I
, 6:30 P. M. Young People's Meet- T e Print and B ookJ
ing. The
to 521 E. JEFFERSON STREET
n c--
,-
e
11 FIRST CHURCH OF Announces the Following New Books
_ ,
t CHRIST, SCIENTIST THEY STOOPED TO FOLLY . . . .Ellen Glasgow, Aug. 1
t-
e 10:30 A. M.-Regular morning FISH PREFERRED .......... P. G. Woodhouse, Aug. 1 E
a service. Subject: "Love." E
n e .:LCOURTS OF THE MORNING .... John Buchon, Aug. 9
t. 11:45 A. M.-Sunday School fol-
e lowing the morning service. ROPER'S ROW ..............Warwick Deeping, Aug. 5
g -a
d 7:45 W ednesday evening testi- atlltlllt1 t1I 11UIIIN1111li 11Hi ll!i#11Il illlllllllfl 111 I 1111
d monial meeting.
- The reading room 10 and 11
State Savings Bank Building
isopen daily from 12 to 5 P p l rE eP e a ad n
o'clock except Sundays and Popular Eye Preparations
Holidays.
h '__--, T ..A i, -- 1 - 1 1 _ L ,d

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1.
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11
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1.
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CONGREGATIONAL
CHURCH
State and William Streets
Allison Ray Heaps, Minister
SUNDAY, AUGUST 4
10:45. Mr. Heaps will speak.
Subject: "Religion Coming of
Age."

lDorothy Gray's Eye Nhadow, blue, grey, brown, 1.25.
Dorothy Gray's 'Lashique, brown or black, $1.25.
Dorothy Gray's Muscle Paste, for treating tiny lines
around eyes, $1.50.
Dorothy Gray's Eylac, for puffy eyes, $2.00.
Dorothy Gray's Wash, $1.75.

A Few Interestingly Priced Items
the Drug Section

from

Fountain Syringes, red rubber, $1.00 quality 69c.
Rigaud's Narcisse Talc, 25c quality 15c.
25c Trejur Talc, 15c.
Cheramy Sun Tan powder, trial size 15c. This comes
in Cappi, April Showers, Biarritz, Joli Soir.

FIRST METHODIST
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Corner S. State and E. Wash.
Rev. Arthur W. Stalker, D.D.,
Minister.
Rev. Samuel J. Harrison, Student
Director and Associate Minister.
10:30 A. M. Morning Worship.
"THE MEANING OF LIFE,"
sermon subject of Rev. Eugene
Miles Moore of Royal Oak, who
will be the speaker.
12 Noon. Bible Class for Stu-
.dents at Wesley Hall.
6:00 P. M. Wesleyan Guild De-
votional Meeting. Leader:
Sinforosa Padilla.

Main Floor

'. I' II

FIRS
E
R. E
H. R.
9:30-C
10:30-
12:00-
Hou

T BAPTIST CHL
E. Huron below State
Edward Sayles, Minis
Chapman, Ministe
Students.
Church Bible School
-Mr. Chapman will p
-Student Class at
se. Mr. Chapman.

JRCH
ter.
r for
1.
reach.
Guild
odd'
ality,
our
S
3,
and
$1.00

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