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August 02, 1929 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1929-08-02

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PAGE EWO

THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILN

'i

FRIDAY, AUGUST 2, 1929

~r #umnter I
Published every morning except Monday
during the University Summer Session by.
the Board in Control of Student Publications.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication of all nows
dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local aews pub-
lished herein.
Xntered at the Ann Arbor, Michigan,
postoffice as second class matter.
Subscription by carrier. $z.3o; by mail
$2.00'
Oraces: Press Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
LAWRENCE R. KLEIN
Editorial Director.......... Howard F. Shout
Women's Editor...........Margaret Eckels
City Editor......,............Charles Askren
Books Editor............ Lawrence R. Klein
Sports Editor...........S. Cadwell Swanson
Night Editors

Howard 2. Shout
S. Cadwell Swanson
Charles Askren
Assistants

Walter Wilds
Harold Warrenj

Ben Manson /L-.dru Davis
Ross Gustin Margaret Harris
Dorothy Magee William Mahey
Paul Showers Marguerite Henry
Deirdre McMullan Rhea Goudy
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
LAWRENCE E. WAMLEY.
Assistant Business Manager............Vernor Davis
Publications Manager ................ Egbert Davis
Circulation Manager...........Jeanette Dale
Accounts Manager..............Noah Bryant
FRIDAY, AUGUST 2, 1929
Night Editor- Charles A. Askren
MARX DEPOSED
The German Social-Democrat
party is staging a revolution
against the old Marxian theories of
economics and government which
have been such prominent influ-
ences on European politics in the
last few years. Their new policies
and proposals have been set out
in a book, "Wirtschaftdemocratie,"
edited by a score or so of promi-
nent statesmen, labor leaders, and
scholars.
The most outstanding character-
istic of the new development is
its striking similarity to the trend
in England and America in the
same field. In fact, statements al-
most identical have been voiced by
the American Federation of Labor
and by the Liberals in Great Brit-
ain.
Economic democracy is set out
as the goal of this new movement.
The term is somewhat analagous
to the "self-government in indus-
try" contention of American labor-
ites.
The important points in the new
program are:testablishment of an
equal legal status for Labor, an
increasing share for Labor in the
rising product of industry, the re-
representation of Labor on all pub-
lic economic bodies, and the ex-
tension of government-owned and
operated enterprises especially in
the field of public utilities.
Probably the most doubtful point
in the whole publication, which is
avowdedly and obviously socialistic,
is the exact definition or meaning
which is to be given to this. mod-
ern socialism. It is defined by the
writers as "an economic order and
a new social'structure, the details
of which we cannot yet know, but
the fundamental principles of
which can be known by the evolu
lutionary tendencies of our pres-
ent economic life." This means,
undoubtedly, that the new system
of economics and government
which the writers are supporting is
not even understood by themselves.
The present day tendencies in
modern economics .which they have
listed cannot be completely disput-
ed. Labor is achieving recognition
as an equal power-witness the ad-
vent of Labor Party into control in
Great Britain; Labor is receiving
a never increasing share of the
profits of industry; Labor is rather
slowly gaining representation on
all public economic bodies; and.
sadly enough, the government is
extending itself to include enter-
prises which were better in private
control.
But whatever the future of Labor

in other countries, it may be re-
iterated as a fact that the Social-
Democrats, the labor party in Ger-
many, are achieving more and
more power and authority in that
country. However, their theories,
like those of their countrymen,

ious attention in this or any other
non-European country. There are
surely more reasonable and con-
structive ways oftbettering labor
conditions-ways that will be in
greater agreement with the princi-
ples of democracy which we pro-
fess.
REVISION NEEDED
Blaming the rigid provisions of
the Baumes law for the recent
prison outbreaks in his state, Gov
Franklin D. Roosevelt has entered
a protest against it and has sug-
gested its modification. It is his
belief that the outbreaks were in
the nature of a revolution against
a law system that metes out the
same degree of punishment for of-
fenses against property as for of-
fenses against the person.
There seems to be little room for
argument with Governor Roose-
velt's stand. Legal reasoning has
ever condemned an offense against
the person much more strongly
than property trespass. Indeed,
the English common law was the
first to give property anything like
the protection that it has today.
The distinction between offenses
which are malum in se and those
which are merely malum prohibi-
tum is too clearly drawn to justify
such flagrant disregard of legal
principles as was evidenced in this
portion of the Baumes law.
Michigan'has been reported. to b
watching with interest the develop-
ments toward modification in the
eastern state, for the provisions of
the Baumes law have been incor-
porated almost bodily into the laws
here. It is expected that a re
ion in New York will be followed
by a similar one in Michigan, but
there seems no very logical reason
why there should be a delay in
writing out so fallacious a prin-
ciple.
The Baumes law has proved itself
workable and effective in the time
that it has been tried out. How-
ever, it will not continue to operate
in the same way if such radically
mistaken portions of it are retained.
"TALKIES"
Everyone is going on record as
either strongly; opposed or strongly
in favor of the talking movies,
which are slowly finding their way
into every cinema house in Amer-
ica. Most of the argument is no
more than a statement of personal
likes and dislikes and takes no ac-
count of the question of whether
the "talkies" do represent an ad-
vance in the picture-making and
presenting business or are a last
feeble attempt to bring a waning
public interest back to its old
standard.
Viewed from amoreor less tech-
nical point of view the "talkies'
are a distinct advance over the
silent picture-not merely because
they are an added element but be-
cause they are, and will be more
than evel in the future, contribut-
ing a greater power, and beauty,
and effectiveness to presentations
on the silver screen.
There is something to the argu-
ment that if audiences can derive
pleasure from seeing acting in the
motion picture houses, they can
certainly receive added pleasure
from hearing the actors speak. If

the technique of speaking on the
screen is as perfectly developed as
that of acting has been, there
r should be a great increase in the
reality and nearness of the scene,
as well in the artistry of the pro-
ductions.
At present there is a development
under process of perfection which
may make the motion picture even
more like the legitimate stage; it
is the creation of a third dimen-
sion illusion so that the talking
will not seem to come fom "sha-
dows" but from real people. If this
project is carried out and others
of the same general nature are in-
troduced, there is reason to expect
the domination of the whole field
of theater entertainment by the
"talkies."
At present, it must be admitted,
there are many characteristics of
the speaking screen which do not
increase its popularity. Most of
these can be attributed to lack of
skill in erecting and adjusting the
mechanism. It is certainly not en-
joyable to watch. a character on
the screen speak and to hear him
speak a minute or so later. Often-
times also the machines are install-
ed in theaters where the acoustics
distort the sounds into menine-

However, in general the "talkies"
have been a success and all the
rantings of' aesthetic critics cannot,
destroy the fact of their popularity.
There must be an added zest and
interest or this corndition would
not exist. The "talkies" deserve
more support and appreciation.
Editorial Comment
(From the Cornell Daily Sun)
HARVARD GOES ARTISTIC
Harvard, fount of socialist pub-
lications and all that is progressive
again. The Fogg Museum of Art,
in modern education, has scored
a part of Harvard university, has
offered, without charge, works of
fine arts for loan to Harvard stu-
dents for room decorations. The
ostensible purpose of the loans is
to stimulate interest in art among
the undergraduates. All students
except freshmen may avail them-
selves of the opportunity. Whether
this is to be taken as an indica-
tion that Harvard thinks her fresh-
men incapable of artistic apprecia-
tion, or merely unworthy of the
privilege is purely a matter of con-
jecture.
The plan has infinite possibilities.
Coincident with the gradual demise
of the collegiate coon-skin coat and
the ramshackle automobile, we may
perhaps hope for the passing of
pilfered "No Parking" signs, gaudy
pennants, and cheap pictures from
student walls. Thus the last vest-
ige ofthe collegiate legend will sink
into oblivion. More important, how-
ever, is the probable result in the
awakening of a real interest in art
in the undergraduate mind. Led
by the noble example of the famed
Harvard "Gold Coast" and the
Yard, we may ultimately see every
student-room throughout the coun-
try graced with prints of the mas-
terpieces of a Raphael, a Van Dyke,
or a da Vinci.
Such an effort, fostering, as it
does, an artistic appreciation, mer-
its the warmest praise. It is just
such gestures as this which indi-
cate a ha~n rt nt nm~n

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IIV

University of Michioga'n Plays
By
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN STUDENTS
With introduction by Prof. Louis A. Strauss and edited by Kenneth Thorpe
Rowe of the University of Michigan,
SI.,.

WAHR'S

UNIVERSITY
BOOKSTORE

a iiuppy return to normalcy of I
the college world so surfeited with
I "over-emphasis" and undue alum-
ni influence.
WILL EUROPE CO-OPERATE?
(From The Daily Illini)
France's foreign. minister, Arstide
Briand is expected to outline
a plan for the organization of the
"United States of Europe" at the
meeting of the League of Nations
in September. The plan does not
include having a president, and a
parliament over the entire country,
and an elaborate governmental
machine.
Under the proposal, each nation
would meet with representatives of
all the other nations periodically,
and discuss economic and political
conditions, with the idea in view of
straightening out any difficulties.
Naturally, the idea has met some
opposition. The Royalist paper in
France has been loud in its denun-
ciation of the scheme, saying that
it is just another dream,, and an
absurd one at that. Other nations
are afraid that the United States
would be opposed to the organiza-
tion, and would start a World
war immediately. However, if the
United States is favorable to the
idea, these countries, and persons,
have no further objections. In
fact, if this country reacts favor-
ably to the idea, most of the Eur-
opeans believe that the organiza-
tion will be given considerable
impetus by that reaction.
But there still remains the age-
old question: Can the various na-
tions of Europe, which have been
wrangling for centuries overs boun-
dary lines, and land, ever become
intimate enough to form such a con-
federation, and if such plan is
adopted, will they be friendly
enough to discuss difficult matters
in a peaceful manner? Ideally,
the plan sounds excellent. Many
good things can be accomplished by
"mergers"-as the United States is
attempting to show the world now,
but practically, the United States
of Europe does not appear to be a
completely plausible idea.
The Detroit Free Press announces
in its news columns that there is a
"war" in progress between Play
Production and The Daily. If Play
Production will respect our flag of
truce, we should like to enter their
stronghold and see their nlav this

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