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July 28, 1929 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1929-07-28

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SUNDAY, JULY 28, 1929

THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY

PAE THREE

w'F .... .... __ __...

WAR RENUNCIATION CEREMONIES
EXPECTEDIN TBSTER
HOO0SIER TITLE HOPES'
WILL REPORT FOR FOOTBALL
PRACTICE THISr
SEPTEMBER
BENNETT NOT TO RETURN'
Pat Page Anhounces New Policy for'

HONORED BY NATIONS

PITTSBURG AND TECH
TO SHARE IN STADIUM,
FOR FOOTBALL GAMES.

l LASSIF\E

TYPEWRITING AND MIMEO-
GRAPHING promptly and neatly
done by experienced operators at
moderate rates. College work a
specialty since 1908. E. D.
O. D. MORRILL
17 Nickels Arcade

HAVE FINEST SCHEDULE
STELLAR CONTESTS IN
HISTORY

OF

Coming Year; Leaders To Be
Chosei Before Games
BLOMINGTON, Ind, July 28.-
When Pat Page issues the initial
call for football practice at Indiana
University in September, 19 letter-
men are expected to answer. These
men will form the nucleus for
Page's 1929 edition of the Scrappin'
HooIiers. Of this number, eight~
men already have received two let-
ters in football and will play their
last season of college football this
year.
The eight veterans are: Paul
Balay and Carrol Ringwalt, Indian-
apolis; John Magnabosco, Clinton;
Frank Faunce, Marion; Wilbert
Catterton, Kenosha, Wis.; William
Shields, Muncie; and Lowell Todd,
Bedford. Of this group, four are
backfield men and four are line-
men.
Indiana had an exceptionally
promising group of sophomores last
season, with 11 of them receiving
letters as follows: George Rfss
Wabash; Charles Brubaker, Ft.
Wayne; Ed Hughes, Gary; J. W.
Unger, West Point, Miss.; Kennyth
Bennett, Linton; Neal Baxter, Bluff
ton; Fred Swihart, Goshen; Ben
Mankowski, Detroit; Paul Jasper,
Ft. Wayne; Frank Hojnacki, De-
troit, and Joe Dudding, Hope. All
but the first three named are line-
men.
Pat Page and the Indiana team
were hard hit by the June gradua-
tion and nine men who have been
playing regular for the past three
years will be missing from the line-
up. Among these men are four
all-Western performers: Chuck
Bennett, all-westernhalfback, win-
ner of the Chicago Tribune most
valuable player trophy and offense
captain; Claire Randolph, al west-
ern center; Paul Harrell, al-west-
ern punter, and Bob Matthew, all-1
western guard and defense captain.
Indiana will have no regular cap-
tain this year aj the 1928 team, at
the end of the season, voted not to
have one. This same plan was
used by Page two years ago. Last
year I. U. had two captains-a de-
fense and an offense leader. Pageteshajutbfrechgm
sates that just before eahgam
he will appoint a defense and an
offense leader. The choice of the
leaders for each game will depend
upon the work of the men during
the practices preceding the contest.1
There will be a letterman for
each position on the team. The
backfield work will be divided
up as follows: Balay or Bru-
baker, quarterback; Magnabosco or3
Hughes, fullback; and Todd, Ross
or Faunce, halfbacks. Competition1
will be keen for the center of the
line. Three guards, Bennett, Swi-
hart, Hojnacki; and three centers,
Ringwalt, Mankowski, Baxter, will
be available. Of this group, Ring-
wat is the only two-letter man.
Indiana will have two well known
men at the wing positions. Branch
McCracken, basketball captain for1
the 1929-30 season, and Wilbert
Catterton, regular for two years on
the grid team, will act in this

Above, President Hoover ope
room of White House as he proc
ing left to right: Former Presie
B. Kellogg.
Tatterman Mari
Praised For I
Gordon Craig Has Approved of
Puppets Having No Bad Acting
Habits, for Cleansing Theater
Concerning the company which
will present two performances of
thei puppet show, "The King of the
Golden River," Monday in the Lyd-
ia Mendelssohn Theater, Mills and
Dunn, in their book, "Marionettes,
Masks, and Shadows," have said,
"Mr. William Duncan and Mr. Ed-
ward Mabley, creators of the Tat-
terman Marionettes, have brought
to the marionette stage unusual
imagination and skill, which is ad-
mirably shown in their 'The Melon
Thief," "The King of the Golden
River," and "Pierre Patelin."
Much interest in the career of
the marionette has become evident
during recent years in America.
Perhaps the best known name as-
sociated with its promotion is that
of Tony Sarg, who has given con-
siderable time to experimentation
with the puppet.
There is still another artist who
is giving his attention to the mar-
ionette. He is Gordon Craig, a man
prominent in theatrical circles, and
an ardent student of stage tech-
nique. Craig, after much experi-
ence with the human actor, has1
come to adopt strenuous views con-
cerning the material which must
furnish characters for the stage.
It is his belief that the actor must
be a thing of fixed form, a cre-I
ation of dead material, stone, can-
vas, paper and paint, in artistic
arrangement. In this way the ever-
changing human form will be sup-
planted by one whose individuality
cannot conspire against the cor-
rect portrayal of the stage char-
acter which it represents.
Constantin Stanislavsky, in his
"My Life in Art," has said of him:
"Craig dreamed of a theater with-
out men and women, without ac-
tors. He wanted to supplant them
with marionettes who had no bad
habits, no bad gestures, no painted
faces, no exaggerated voices, no
smallness of soul, no worthless am-
bitions. The marionettes would
have cleansed the atmosphere of
the theater, they would have given
a high seriousness to the enter-
prise, and the dead material from
which they were made would have
given Craig an opportunity to hint
at that Actor who lived in the soul,
the imagination, and the dreams
of Craig himself."
The ideal theater which Craig
has visualized has perhaps its mod-
ified existence in the enterprise of
Agrippino Manteo, an Italian who
is at present producing the epic of

. ' '8 8894 8

ning ceremonies before representatives of 43 nations in historic East
laimed the Kellogg treaty for the renunciation of war in effect. Stand-
nt Coolidge, President Hoover and Former Secretary of State Frank

unettes Creators
magination, Skill
"Orlando Furioso" in a theater far
from Broadway, near the Bowery.
Given at the rate of one episode a
night, this production, opened last
March, will not reach its comple-
tion until some time in 1932. After
that time, the Manteos will travel
to California, giving their play
along the way.
Orlando Furioso is an nistoric
puppet play, concerned with Char-
lemagne, the Saracens, and the mad
knight Orlando. The Manteos have
given the puppet Orlando a pair
of crossed eyes, as a whimsical sym-
bol of his madness.
The marionette has had a varied,
though continuous, career through
the centuries. Having its beginning
in the Oriental countries, it has
undergone many changes in its
passage from country to country.
The Japanese have been the peo-
ple to develop the marionette to its
highest perfection, creating crea-'
tures who were capable of count-
less facial expressions, not unlike
the human. Rome is credited with
the possession of three kinds of
marionettes: the Burattini, worn
likfie a glove; the Fantoccini, joint-
ed dolls strung across the knees;
and the type which is in use today,'
the puppet worked by string and
wires from above.
WILL HOLD LAST
PARTY AT LEAGUE
Members of the faculty and the
student body, both men and wom-
en, will be the guests of the Wom-
en's League Friday, August 2, from
9 to 12, at the League building.
This party will be the last of the
series of entertainments which the

DANCING CHAPEL RUN
BY MICHIGA'N WOMAN
Anieka Leggett Interprets Religious
Themes in Florentine Colony
of Terpsichoreans
HAS COSTETTI PAINTINGSj
FLORENCE, Italy, July 27- A
chapel of dance stands on the sum-
mit of one of the hills surrounding
Dante's city of Florence, and in it
an American, Miss Anieka Yan
Leggett, member of a prominent
Detroit, Michigan, family, inter-
prets religious themes in move-
ment.
For several years Miss Leggett
has been a member of the large
Anglo-American colony here, and
now when she gives her religious
dances a section of the colony, as
well as some of Italy's numerous
aristocrats, flock to her little cha-
pel.
A celebrated painter of Florence,
John Costetti, once saw Miss Leg-
gett dance, and immediately volun-
teered to decorate her chapel. Miss
Leggett has taken over a little
church-like building near her home
overlooking the city, but the in-
terior was not finished. Costetti
set to work and depicted on the
walls some of the tableaux of mo-
tion interpreted by the beautiful
American.
The dancer has dranw her in-
spiration for her costumes and
movements from the world famous
paintings of Fra Giovanni of Fie-
sole, who it is said, knew the art
of rendering his worshipping an-E
gels incorporeal, and of Filippo Lip-
pi, particularly in his painting of
Lucretia.
Miss Leggett tries through her
dances to give a fundamental im-
I cin of i ,z it i tiix Thb , "h

HOPE FOR CHAMPIONSHIP
Two All-America Ends Will Appear
Against Each Other in Pitt- !
Ohio State Game
(By Don F. Saunders, Special to
The Daily)
PITTSBURGH, July 27-With thel
University of Pittsburgh and Car-
negie Tech football teams sharing1
The Stadium, the mammoth con-3
crete bowl erected by Pitt in 1924,
Wastern Pennsylvania is assured off
one of the finest schedules of stel-
lar attrci.eions ever offered.
Among the big games slated for
The Stadium are the Pitt-West Vir-
ginia, Carnegie Tech-W. and J.,
Carnegie Tech-Notre Dame, Pitt-
Olio State, Pitt-W. and J., Pitt-
Carnegie Tech, and Pitt-Penn
State.
Both Pitt and Tech will have bat-
ter-than-average teams, and thosej
who remember the Pitt team ofI
1927, and the Tech eleven of last
season, believe the 1929 Eastern grid
champions will be one or the other
of the two local teams.
PITTSBURGH, July 27-Football
prospects at the University of Pitts-
burgh are undeniably bright. When
the Golden Panthers begin train-
ing' for the 1929 campaign the first
week in September, only three reg-
ulars of last season's powerful elev-
en will be missing.
The 1928 backfield, composed of
Tom (Pug) Parkinson, California,
Pa., fullback; Harold (Josh) Wil-'
liams, Mars and Toby Uansa, Mc-
Kees Rocks, halfbacks, and Charles
Edwards, Moundsville, W. Va., quar-
terback, will return intact. Regular
linemen who will be available are
Joe Donchess, Youngstown, O., all-
America end; Charles Tully, Whee-
ling, W. Va., tackle; Captain-elect
Al DiMeolo, Coraopolis, guard, and
Ray Montgomery, Wheeling, center.
Coach Jock Sutherland's Panth-'
ers will play a hard nine-game
schedule, including intersectional
contests with Duke University at,
Durham, N. C., and University of
Nebraska at Lincoln. Ohio State,
the first Western Conference team
to play in Pittsburgh, will meet Pitt
in the Homecoming Day game here
November 2.,

THE RAGGEDY ANN BEAUTY,
SHOP OFFERS A
Marcel at 75c; Finger wave at $1.00;
Permanent wave at $8.50. Dial 7561,
MACK TUTORING AGENCY
Open for Summer School
310 S. State St. Phone 7927
TYPING-Theses a specialty. Fair
rates. M. V. Hartsuff, Dial 9387.
FOR RENT
FOR RENT-Forest near Hill; 14
rooms party furnished. 3 baths.
Double garage. Phone 5740.
FOR RENT-Large one-room com-
pletely furnished apartment for
two girls or young couple. Also
newly decorated double for girls.
422 E. Washington. Dial 8544 or
9714.
FOR RENT- Unfurnished apart-
ments-upper and lower. Southeast
section. Modern. Call 5929.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE-Late Model T Ford
Sedan. Good tires. Excellent
condition. Price $75. See owner
540 Walnut. 28
LOST
LOST-On State street. between
Huron and M. Hut, gold pin
valued as heirloom. Reward.
Phone 21566.
LOST-A brown notebook with im-
portant notes and two letters
with a brown pocketbook. Re-
ward. Call 4918.
LOST-Shaeffer's Life-time foun-
tain pen without cap. Finder
kindly telephone 8069 at 730,
Arbor Street. 22, 23, 24
LOST-Dickinson's Excursions in
Musical History. Phone 6654.
Reward. 1217 Baldwin.
WANTED
YOUNG MEN for advertising cam-
paign. 220 Nickels Arcade. Thurs-
day from 1 to 3.
WANT ADS PAY!
PORTABLE
TYPEWRITERS
We have all makes.
Remington, Royals.
Corona, Underwood
Colored duco finishes. Price $60.
O. D. MOR1kILL
17 Nickels Arcade Phone 6615

----------

.

m

een

SUMMER STUDENTS
Secure Your Supplies at

League has undertaken this sum- s spr ua y. roug
mer and will furnish an informal every movement of the body,
r at h r o u g h gestures, expressions,
social evening for all members of1 of the face, and still poses, she tries
the Summer Session. to convey religious conceptions.
Cosing 01 tS agle
Still Deeper Cuts In
Price This Week
I have moved shoes into the $6.85,
$7.85 and $8.85 sections that were $10.85
last week. $1.00 less for 2nd and 3rd pairs.
If you know anything about my shoes and better service
your good judgment will tell you to buy all the shoes we have
to fit you at such low prices.
If you have never worn any Purfield's Shoes now is your
opportunity to buy them for less than ordinary shoes and find
out what you have been missing for years.
ALL CANVAS RUBBER SOLED
SHOES NOW LESS THAN COST.
I have sorted all Ladies', Men's and Children's into 3 lots
at follows:
Values from $4.00 to $4.50 cut to $2.00 pair
Values -up to $3.50 now $1.50 pair
Values up to $2.50 only $1.00 pair
p CORNER
FOURTH AVE.
AND
__ LIBERTY ST.

II

DRESS

COATS

Unusual reductions on these fa
Shown in such wanted materials as
Kasha,-fur trimmings in Squirrel,
Lapin and Omhre Mole.
Coats that formerly sold up to
price of
$25

ashionable dress coats.
Majora, Norma, and
American Broadtail,

r

b...m

SUMMER
Reductions On
Ready-to -Wear

$69.50

at our July

t:,. t2l
f" m '

1111 South University Ave.

2 Block from Campus I

LANE HALL TAVERN

SILK DRESSES
Ann array of the season's smartest silk dress styles,
youthful effects, cleverly designed in every detail. Plain
crepes and figured materials. Dreshes that formerly sold up
to $69.75, our July price brings them down to
$29.75
Another group of 'silk dresses that display the newest
style tendencies. Formerly priced up to $39.75, now in our
July Sale at
$22.75
Second Floor

I

The Choicest of Wholesome Foods

F

F'

Mrs. Anna Kalmbach

1

mill l

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