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July 28, 1929 - Image 1

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1929-07-28

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THE WEATHER,
Fair and warmer.

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MEMBER OF THE
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

I

VOL. X, No. 30 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, JULY 28, 1929 PRICE FIVE CENTS
JUL.2, 92

PROF J 0, WNTER
OF CLASSICS FACULTY
W(ILL"GIVE LECTURE
MONDAY LECTURE WILL CON
CERN ANCIENT MONUMENTS
IN ROME
GRIFFIN TALKS TUESDAY
Professor Aveling, of London Uni-
versity, Will Speak Wednesday
on Labor Topic
Prof. John G. Winter of the Lat-
in department of the Universit
will give the first of the' Universit
special Summer Session lectures fo
next week. At 5 o'clock Monda
afternoon he will speak on "An-
cient Monuments in Modern Rome"
Slides will be used to illustrate the
talk.
Tuesday's lecture also will be de-
livered by a faculty man. Dean C
E. Griffin of the University schoo:
of business administration, wil
speak on "The Economics of the
Automobile Industry." Researches
in this subject have been conductec
by the school in the past.
Aveling to Lecture
From University of London, Eng-
land, comes Prof. Francis Aveling
to talk on "The Human Factor in
Industry," Wednesday afternoon.
The elements that enter into the
natural lighting of buildings will
be discussed on the following after-
noon by Prof. H. H. Higbe of the
electrical engineering department
of the engineering college. His will
be the last lecture of the week.
Play, Music,, Reception
The usual weekly concert offered
by University School of Music fac-
ulty members will be given Tues-
day evening in Hill auditorium,
while the Michigan Repertory
Players ' present George Kelly's
"Craig's Wife" the following even-
ing at Lydia Mendelssohn theater.
The company repeats the perfor-
mance Thursday ad Saturday eve-
nmgs, Friday being left open to
permit all who desire to attend the
second and last factulty reception
of the present summer session. The
event will be under the auspices
of the Women's league and will be
held in the Michigan League build-
ing.
Under the direction of Prof. Jesse
P. Rowe, the seventh excursion will
leave the campus Saturday after-
noon for an inspection tri p to Put-
in-Bay, Lake Erie. The p arty will
return to Ann Arbor late th at night.
TACO MATO KID FYE
To HOP OFF M ONDA
(By Associated Press)
TACOMA, Wash., July 28.-Lieri-
tenant Harold A. Bromley an-
nounced today that he would take
off at daybreak Monday for Tokio
in his monoplane "City of Tacoia"
ifbweather conditions were favor-
able.
Preparation for the 4,700 mile
non-stop flight over the Pacific is
leading to conjectures that Brom-
ley might' take off tomorrow. He
said, however, he would not be

ready until Monday.
Shortly after the arriv al of Brom-
ley at the Airport and a, conference
between him, airport o fficials, and
technicians, the guard around "The
City of Tacoma" was d.oubled. All
spectators were ordereid back be-
yond a line 100 feet fro m the plane.
At the same time automobiles
were ordered out of the main air-
port enclosure which, leads direct-
ly to the runway.
The plane was fuelledt, except for
"topping." The last top -of 100 gal-
lons or more of ge'soline, which will
fill the tanks to the brim, will be
poured in just before the takeoff.
Bromley said he asked only as-
surances of fak weather conditions
on the first sta:ge of his long flight.
After reaching Dutch Harbor, Alas-
ka, on his northward swing over
the great circle route, he said his
fuel load would be lightened
enough so that his fast plane could
cone with any storm canditinns n-

r,

TENNIS STAR

FH

IEALTH EDUCATION'AMERICAN DOUBLES AT THE RACES
PROBLEM TO OBTAIN TEAM TAKES MATCH'
OBJECTIVE PROGRAM FROM fRENCH STAR....

MISS EVANS SUGGESTS ART OF FRANCE NEEDS BUT ONE WIN
AROUSING INTEREST BY IN MATCHES TODAY TO
VARIOUS DEVICES RETAIN CUP
STANDARDIZATION NEEDED 10,000 PERSONS SEE GAMEf
Games, Posters,' Dramatics Used 1Collegian Team of Van Ryn, Alli-
by Clever Teacher to Interest son Display Sp'endid Form To
Child in Health Down Borotra, Cochet
"The greatest problem in health By J. E. Angly

Henri Cochet
Who with Borotra set out yes-
terday to give the American dou-
bles stars, Van Ryn and Allison, a
beating.
STUDENT PLAYS ADDED
TO LIBRARY SHELVES
"The University of Michigan Plays"
Is First Book of Kind Ever
To Be Published
FIVE PLAYS ARE 'INCLUDED
The continued popularity of the
only original piece of the work by
the student body, "The University
' of Michigan Plays," which has ever
been published in the University
has caused the book to be added to
the University collection in the
Library.
The volume of plays, five in num-
ber, is the matured result of the
efforts of Kenneth T. Rowe, as-
sistant professor of Rhetoric and
instructor in the play writing
course of the regular session, and
Valentine B. Windt, Director of
Play Production, as well as the
interest of several members of the
play writing class. A contest was
held during the last part of the
first semester last year in which
about 30 one-act plays were enter-
ed. Play Production was enlisted to
produce six which withstood elim-
ination at a private showing.
Play Production was enlisted to
help in presenting the playsa nd
after preliminary elimination, four
were finally produced for judging
by Miss Jessie Bonstelle, Daniel L.
Quirk, director of the Ypsilanti
players, and Professor Chester M.
Wallace, head of the School of
Drama at Carnegie Institute of
Technology and at present director
of Play Production, who selected
"The Joiners" by Arthur Hinkley
for first place. The other plays
were: "Outside This Room," Dor-
othy Ackerman; "Passion's Prog-
ress," R. L. Askren; "My Man,"
JerOmne McCarthy.
Men's Education Club
To Hold Picnic Monday
The Men's Education club will
hold its feature meeting of the
Summer Session tomorrow after-
noon at Pleasant lake, where the
members will indulge in the annual
summer picnic.
Starting at 4 o'clock cars will
leave periodically for the scene of
the picnic. Food will not be served
until 7 o'clock in order to allow alli
ample time to arrive.
It is rumored that Prof. Luther1
souri, and D. A. Shirley of the Texas
state Teachers' college are to he

education today is to find methods
which will give an objective pro-1
gram, and means of measurement
that will bring standardization,"
said Miss Alice Evans, assistant
professor of physical education, in'
conference for superintendents,
t), ncipals, and, supervisom.
Miss Evans outlined a number of
plans that are helpful in develop-
ing 'a school health program. Dra-;
r..atics, posters, year's scrap-books,
games and various other devices
may be employed by the clever
f acher to arouse and sustain chil-
(Iren s interest in learnin-; of and
carirmg for their health. There must,
be. she said, a definite coordination'
under a single guidance to plan
the health program of an entirel
school system, so that undesirable1
repetition will be avoided and a1
complete covering of essential
points will be assured.
Although it is true that a cor-
relation of many subjects with
health teaching is possible, Miss1
Evans advised against the dragging
in artificially of such teaching.
Benefits will be derived only as the
work is an outgrowth of the child'st
interest. This can best be achieved
through the subjects where health'
is the basic matter, being augment-
ed, however, by correlation.
HOOVER SSTSID
W IT H D E B0 T A R E M N
(By Associated Press)
WASHINGTON, July 27- Presi-
dent Hdover, in expressing grati-
fication today that France had rat-
ified the Melon-Berenger Debtj
Agreement, told the American peo-
ple that "this settlement in effect

Associated Press Staff Writer
PARIS, July 28.-France will have
to wait another day to pour cham-
pagne into the Davis cup, the
gleaming silver bowl that symbol-
izes world supremacy in tennis.

Hopeful of winning three straight mazo horse races when the plane
matches, the French sent their best hit a :ut and bounced on its nose.
doubles team of Henri Cochet andl
Jean Borotra onto the court today TTif
against the United States but the
singles conquerors of Big Bill Til-{
den and George Lott were soundly T
and smartly beaten by two Amer-
can collegianls, John. Van Ryn and T L - [ M NA
Wilmer Allison, the one from
Princeton and the other from Marionettes Will Give "King of the
Texas. France needs but one more Golden River" and Several
victory in two matches tomorrow, Short Numbers
however,, to keep the Davis Cup .
another year. America must win' EXCHANGE CLUB IS HOST
both to win back the trophy. I
Ten thousand spectators packed Intrigueing persons of all ages,
the Roland Garros stadium to see the Tatterman Marionettes will pre-
Allison and Van Ryn triumph in sent John Ruskin's "The King of
double quick time by scores of 6-1, the Golden River" and several
8-6, 6-4. shorter numbers in the Lydia Men-
Until today many a garralous delssohn theater tomorrow at 2:15
Gaul would have argued through and 8:15 o'clock.
a full hour and several drinks on In addition to the Ruskin piece,
the proposition that Cochet and the puppets will appear in the Jap-
Borotra together constituted e t anese lyric-drama, "The Melon
best doubles team that can be put Thief." This play, more than one
on a tennis court but not now. hundred years old, is primarily for
Cochet and Borotra, were capableIhnrdyasodi rmrl o
Cocht an Bortra wer capbleadults, but there is considerable ap-
of sterling shots from anywhere on palti nuifrc sden. ble hr-
peal in it for children. Two short,
the court, the other a nimble and typical puppet offerings will also be
audacious artist at volloying beat included on the program. These
Bill Tilden and Francis T. Hunter will probably be a Pickaninny
last year in the Davis Cup finals dance, and an acrobatic act.
t they were scarcely a match this More than one hundred children
afternoon for the dazzling pair. from the University hospital will be
the guests of the Ann Arbor Ex-
'change club at the matinee per-
formance.
r ~ .. . r, .Has Special Appeal I

GoTY. Fred W. Green
Imagine his embarrassment whsn
he ol on his nose before 7,030
loYal sons of A/"lhigan! The Gov-
ernor was flying with a friend as
pil't to the opening of the Kala-

JMISS JEAN DISCUSSES
NEW HEALTH METHODS
IN CHINA,_PHILIPPINES
HEALTH EDUCATION EXPERT
SPEAKS BEFORE LAST
OF INSTITUTES
ROSE, SAGINAW, PRESIDES
I Sundwall Expresses Gratification
at Outcome of Series and
Interest in Course
"Let us make application our
object but resting on the stern
and solid basis of scientific prin-
ciples. Without these principlesnap-
plication is a mere repetition of
recipes. Progress with routine is
possible but desperately slow," quot-
ed Miss Sally Lucas Jean, consul-
tant in national and international
health education programs, from
the writings of Dr. Louis Pasteur,
famous French bacteriologist, in
j her lecture before the final Public
Health Institute yesterday after-
noon.
Philippine Work
j Miss Jean's brilliant lecture
brought to a close the series of
Public Health Institutes conducted
during the Summer Session by the
department of Hygiene and Public
Health of the University. She held
the undivided attention of those
I attending in spite of the intense
heat. Her world wide contact with
health conditions and especially
health education programs in the
schools warranted the praise which
has been given her while in Ann
Arbor. An interesting description
of the introduction of American
methods in the Philippines and in
China formed the theme of Miss
Jean's talk. From her wide ex-
perience in this field she brought
the suggestion that our reports and
programs should state not only the
successes and procedures of some
experiment but also the failures of
others so that foreign countries
may profit by our experience.
Dr. Rose, Commissioner of Health,
Saginaw County, was the presiding
officer. Dr. Kendall Emerson,
managing director of the National
Tuberculosis Association of New
York City, lectured on "Tubercu-
losis" and stressed the "Early Dis-
covery, Early Recovery" slogan and
the effectiveness of this means of
finding incipient cases.
Pratt Lectures
"A sound principle of mental
hygiene is to face the realities of
life," according to Dr. George K.
Pratt in his lecture on "Mental
Hygiene and the Public Health." "If
a child practices this early it will
augment his ability to adjust him-
self to difficulties encountered later
in life," he stated.
One of the outstanding lectures
of the six weeks session was that
of Dr. Edith S. Bryan of the Uni-
versity of California, on the sub-
ject of "Child Hygiene."
The final meeting of health
workers was exceedingly gratifying
to Dr. John Sundwall, director ®f
Division of Hygiene, Public Health
and Physical Education, in that it
manifested the desire of those in
the field to return for a week-end
and receive an intensive course in
the newer aspects of the rapidly de-
veloping field of Public Health.

INSURGENT STU DENTS
TO ISSUEOWN DAILY
-The Wisconsin Cardinal, for years
the student daily of the University
of Wisconsin, will have an opponent
in the field next year, entirely out
of faculty control, if recent plans
are followed.
C. Hjalmer Nelson, managing edi-
tor of next year's Cardinal resigned
his position with the University
publication, and with him went a
great part of his staff, according
to the Wisconsin Alumni Magazine.
Nelson and others felt that there
"was too much faculty interference
to permit the production of a real
newspaper," and so banded togeth-
er with some faculty members and
business men of Madison and next
n fQ1Trl vta mvi - 3..,. .a

I UL IUHNAMEN I
By_ W. G. Stevenson

wipes out the entire indebtedness (Associated Press Staff Writer)
oaDETROIT, July 28.-Barring a
of France which arose during the complete reversal of form and a
war period, and simply provides for collapse of his game, Johnny Mal-
the payments of advances to loy of Ann Arbor will have another
France after the Armistice." state golf championship in his pos-
''I think in fairness to the Amer- session tonight. He was seven up
ican people I am justified in men- on Francis W. Ryan of Detroit at
tioning the liberality of the settle- j the end of the first 18 holes of their
.ment," the President said, "adding 36-hole final match in the Michi-
that the French debt to the United gan Golf league tournament here
States on June 15, 1925 was $4,- at noon today.
230,000,000 and that, on a five per Malloy's golf was almost perfect,
cent basis which the French obli- while that of his opponent was
gations bear the present value of somewhat erratic. Ryan frequently
the payments in the Melon-Berin- found the rough and drove often
ger Agreement, concluded subse- into the traps of the Detroit Coun-
quently is $1,681,000,000. try club course.
Change Of Date On Dinner Sets
Makes First Editions Valuable

Puppeteering should have an es-
pecial appeal for the educators on
the campus due to the recent ten-
dency to give instruction in mar-I
ionette work in secondary schools.
Opportunity will be afforded those
attending the performances to visit
the backstage after the show at
which time demonstrations will be
given in the manipulation of the
wooden players.
This appearance of "The King
of the Golden River" holds much
interest in the fact that the adap-
tion of this story for puppets was
made by Catherine Reighard, '15,
of New York, who studied drama
on this 'campus, later going to Har-
vard, continuing her work under
Prof. George Pierce Baker in his
"47 Workshop."
Founded in 1923
The Tatterman group, which was
founded in 1923, is under the di-
rection of William Duncan and Ed-
ward Mabley, both of Detroit. Many
of the numbers which they use
are originals or adaptations by Miss
Reighard. The best of these appear
in her book, "Plays for People and
Puppets," which the New York Her-
ald Tribune'placed among the "fif-
ty best books for 1928."
The two performances here Mon-
day are being sponsored by the
Ann Arbor Alumnae association.
The hope which has been current
on the campus that the Mendel-
ssohn theater would house produc-
tions other than merely local of-
ferings is materialized in this bill-
ing.
Son Of Stinnes Freed
On Mail Fraud Charge
(By Associated Press)
BERLIN, July 28.-Hugo Stinnes,
jr., son of the German post-war in-
dustrial magnate, was declared not
guilty today of attempting to de-
fraud the German government in !
oneratinns with.h neman n Inn

Michigan dinner plates, bearing
campus views and put out by the
Alumni association, may still be
gotten, although the supply is lim-
ited. These plates come in sets of
12, with a different picture on the
face of each. Represented upon
the plates are Angell hall, the gen-
eral library, the Michigan Union,
the Lawyers club tower, the engin-
eering arch, Ferry Field gates, Uni-
versity hall, Clement's library, the
Women's League, ;and University
hospital.
Being of genuine Wedgewood
ware, the plates have met a steady
demand. One thousand sets were
originally manufactured, of which
only 100 are left. The first hundred
sets were autographed by the pres-
ident of the University and bought
up in 10 days. All of the plates
bear the Michigan seal, dated 1837.
As this date has been changed to
1817 the next order for nlates will

the first group of sets valuable in
the eyes of collectors.
Michigan plates have been pur-
chased by interested persons, main-
ly old grads, in all sections of the
country. Moreover, they have been
sent to various parts of the world,
from Latvia to Honolulu and from
South Africa to Finland. At pres-
ent the price of the plates is $13
a set, delivered, but after August
first they will cost $15 a set plus
postage. They may be obtained at
the Alumnus office in Alumni
memorial hall and will be on dis-
play this week in a State street
bookstore window.
The idea of placing campus
scenes on dinner plates originated
in Harvard and has since been
adopted by other universities, Mich-
igan being the second to take up
the plan. Keen interest is being+
shown by the alumni of the two3
universities-Michigan and Har-
vard-in the fonthal Lma to hp

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