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July 24, 1929 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1929-07-24

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WEDNESDAY, JULY 24, 1929

THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAIL'k

PAGE THRE

_.

PURDUE'S HO~E GID
SCHEDULE TO CONTAIN
MANY N HEAT GAMS
FIVE GAMES ON OWN FIELDS
INCLUDE TWO BIG TEN
TILTS
RENEW DEPAUW RIVALRY
Michigan Is Second on Games List
with First Joust Since Meet
Played in 1900
(Special To The Daily)
LAFAYETTE, Ind., July 24-Jim-
my Phelan's Purdue football squad
will play through one of the best
balanced and most representative
home football schedules in years
this fall, beginning with the open-
ing game of the season against the
Kansas Aggies on October 5 and
ending with the Homecoming battle
against Iowa on November 16. The
Boilermakers' home schedule of 5
games includes two Big Ten tilts,
two outstanding intersectional con-
tests, and renewal of the state ri-
valry with DePauw.
Heavy Ticket Demand
Judging from the early interest
that has been expressed in the tilts
scheduled for the Ross-Ade stad-
ium, there will be a heavy mail or-
der demand for tickets when the
seat.sale is opened later this sum-
mer, particularly in view of the
fact that the first two games of
the season will be among the head-
liners in the middle west.
The clash with Bo McMillin's
Kansas Aggie eleven will provide
a battle of mid-season caliber for
the Old Gold, and Black in its
opening tilt on October 5. McMil-
lin, one to conjure with in football
circles at the time he was starring
for Center College and later coach-
ing at Geneva, is beginning to make
himself felt in the Big Six, and
the early intersectional tilt should
be one of the most colorful battles
of the week in the middle west.
Michigan Game Second
Following the Kansas Aggie tilt,
the Boilermakers will stack up
against Michigan's powerful crew
in the second game of the season
that is expected to draw one of
the biggest crowds of the year. Pur-
due and Michigan have not met
on the gridiron since 1900, and an
unusual amount of interest attach-,
es to the game, especially in view
of the fact that the Wolverines
were credited with having the
strongest freshman team in the Big
Ten last fall and are expected to
be strong contenders under their
new coach, Harry Kipke.1
DePauw will be met here on Oc-
tober 19 in the third successive,
home game, before the Boilerma-
kers jump into the midst of the
conference fray with out-of-town
battles against Chicago and Wis-
consin.I
The home schedule will be resum-
ed when Homer Hazel's Mississippi
eleven invades the Ross-Ade stadi-
um on November 9 in the second.
intersectional contest of the sea-

son. Hazel, former Rutgers star,
has developed some consistent
squads in the Southern Conference,
and the boys from 'Ole Miss' are ex-
pected to give the Boilermakers a
real battle.
The climax of the home season
will come at Homecoming on No-
vember 16 when Purdue will stack
up against the doughty Iowa crew.

Tea Honors Oriental
Students On Campus
A tea in honor of Oriental men
and women will be given from 3:30
to-5:30 this afternoon, in the garden
of the League building. This is the
fourth tea of the Summer Session,
and all students are urged to come,
as it will be an opportunity to meet
the Oriental students. Miss Grace
Richards, adviser of women, will
attend. The tea is in charge of
Dorothy Woodrow, summer presi-
dent of the League, Margaret Har-
ris, secretary-treasurer and Kath-
erine Ferrin, social chairman.
College-High School
Relations Are Lauded
In addressing the School of Ed-
ucation classes in high school ad-
ministration last Monday on the
subject of college entrance require-
ments, Ira M. Smith, registrar of
the University, expressed much
confidence in the estimates of pro -
bable college success of high school
graduates as evaluated by highj
school principals.
The University is fortunate,
Smith declared, in having such a,
cordial relationship with the sec-
ondary schools as would cause prin-
cipals to give discriminating esti-
mates of prospective students. It
has been the speaker's observation
that high school heads of Michigan
are, in general, inclined to be more
discriminating in their recommen-
dations to the University than the
principals of out-of-state high
schools.
Registrar Smith pointed out that
the plans and policies for admit-
ting freshmen as developed in re-
cent years at the University are be-
:ng gradually adopted by the otherj
colleges in Michigan as well as by
colleges and universities in other
states.
The classes to which Smith spoke
are under the direction of Dean J.
B. Edmonson and Prof. Joseph Toe-
mer of the University of Florida.

ILLINOIS To DEDICATE
NEW IOWAN STADIUM
Half Million Do lar Structure Seats
42,000 Fans; Ceremonies Will
Be Seventeenth of Kind
WILL PLAY CAME OCT. 19,
'IOWA CITY, July 24.-Ceremo-
tiles of dedication for the Univer-
sity of Iowa's new football stadium
will be celebrated at the time of the
homecoming game with Illinois,
Oct. 19, it was announced Thurs-
day by Edward H. Lauer, director
of physical education.
The clash with the warriors of
Coach Robert. C. Zuppke will be the
initial Western conference game in
the $500,000 structure. It also will
be the seventeenth meeting in his-
tory between football teams of the
sister universities.
Three months from Friday, the
stadium will stand completely ready
to accomodate what is expected to
be the largest crowd ever to watch
ja Hawkeye football game. The
structure will contain 42,184 perma-
nent seats flanking the gridiron.
An Illinois football team has ap-
peared at Iowa City for a home-
coming game on four other occa-
sions. Iowa won in 1921 and 1925,
but lost in 1923 and 1927.
Never before has Iowa had an
opportunity to dedicate a stadium.
I Iowa field, used for more than 25
years for football, baseball, and
track, is not strictly a stadium,
and when first put into use dedica-
tion ceremonies were neglected.
DOVER, Eng.-Miss Joan Burton
has gone into training for an at-
tempt to swim the English Chan-
nel. She plans to make her trial
on August 8, when she will be 12
years old.

Eight Women Representatives Prove Value
Of Feminine Touch In Political Affairs

It is not nine years yet 'since
women were given their right to
vote, yet so completely his the
country accepted the idea that to-
day, in the 71st session of Congress,'
eight women occupy seats in the
House; and only ten of the States
are without women legislators. The
congresswomen now serving are:
Mrs. Florence P. Kahn of Califor-
nia; Mrs. Edith Nourse Rogers of
Massachusetts; Mrs. Mary T. Nor-
ton, of New Jersey; Mrs. Katherine
Langley of Kentucky; Mrs. Ruth'
Hanna McCormick, widow of the
former senator from Illinois; Mrs.
Ruth Baker Pratt of New York;
Mrs. Ruth Owen of Florida, daugh-
ter of the late William Jennings
Bryan, and Fannie Pearl Oldfield
of Arkansas.
"Naturally, the personalities of
these women are interesting," states
George E. Anderson, writer on
economics and historical subjects.
"Moreover, they are in some re-
spects significant. All of them are
or have been married. Five are
widows-Mrs. Owen being the widow
of a former British army officer
and Mrs. McCormick the widow of
a former member of the Senate. All
of these women have had more or

some of them," Mr. Anderson con-
tinued, "but subsequent and repeat-
ed re-elections can be accounted
for only by the fact that they were
found to be efficient members of
the House, as indeed, they promised
to be from the first."
As the great change represented
by the election of women to Con-
gress should regard results as being
of interest, Mr. Anderson com-
ments, "Candor compels the reply
that there have been no moment-
cus results thus far. But the in-
fluence of these women upon legis-
lation has been almost entirely that
of other conscientious, industrious,
and more or less able members.
"The fact is that ever since wom-
en have exercised the suffrage-and
indeed, for some time previous to
their obtaining it-Congress and
the several legislatures have been
extremely and tenderly solicitous
as to the welfare of women and

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children and of all measures to 9714.
which women on the whole have -S
given their support. LOST
"A successful legislative career is LOST-On State street between
largely a matter of personality," Huron and M. Hut, gold pin
concluded Mr. Anderson. "In their valued as heirloom. Reward.
personal contacts in Congress, wo- Phone 21566.
men representatives are treated

less connection with politics; but with all the gallantry, courtesy and LOST-A brown notebook with im-
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only two, Mrs. Pratt and Mrs. Nor- respect that is due them as women. with a brown pocketbook. Re-
ton, may be said to have establish- But in the actual work of legisla- ward a 4918.
ed their political position in their tion -their influence is affected very
own right. Five of these congress- little by their sex. It is measured LOST- -Shaeffer's Life-time foun-
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LOST-A seven by five black note-
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~___desk at General Library for re-
'""""ward. Lost about June 29.

I

1NE WS FROM OTH ER COL LEGES

3

I' i

ILLINOIS, July 19-Willis Glas
gow, captain-elect of the Unive
sity of Iowa football team, who ofi
en flings himself into physical cor
bat for the honor and glory of h
alma mater, did likewise for hir
self-and it cost him $1 and cos
Charged with engaging in a cor
bat with P. H. McGredden, sta
highway engineer, Glassgow toda
was hauled into court and depart
poorer, but without revealing pa
ticulars concerning the fight, M
Gredden likewise was noncommi
tal.
The football player, who had be
visiting John Haggard, a fraterni
brother, here, left immediately af
erward with the latter to worki
the Kansas harvest fields.
CHICAGO, July 13-Cornelius O
good, 23 year old Chicago explor
has proved himself the first whi
man to be successful in livin
among the truculent Hareskin I
dians. Osgood left for the inn
Arctic circle a year ago to ma
observations of these natives f
the purpose of acquiring materi
for his master's thesis in anthrop
logy. He expects to return in Au
ust.
ILLINOIS--On a narrow sid
street in Pittsburgh, a convert
store- room once provided a pla
for wide-eyed spectators to see su
cinema thrillers as "Poor But Ho
est" and "The Baffled Burglar

5s-
r-
ft-
m-
'is
.M-
ts.
m-
te
ay
ed
t-
le-
it-1
en
ity
It-
in
s-
er,
te
ng
n~-
er
ke
or
ial
0-
,g-

This "home of American picture
shows," as recognized by the His-
torical Society of Western Pictures,
was recently commemorated by the
unveiling of a tablet at its site.
According to Carl E. Milliken, for-
mer governor of Maine, and now
Producers of America, the first
crude "movie house" was a great
success.
INDIANA-In speaking of the na-
tives of her homeland, New Zeal-
and,. Miss .Aimee Porter said that
they were a kindly and conscien-
tious lot, peculiarly steadfast in
their beliefs and traditions. For
instance, one's caste is determined
largely by the tatooed lines of the
face, and they believe that when
one dies, his body reverts to the
body of a bird.
ILLINOIS.-A new ruling was
passed by the Board of Trustees ofI
the University of Illinois forbidding
students to live in apartments,
bungalow courts, and other living
quarters where there cannot be di-
rect control over them by some re-
sponsible party. An exception is
made in the cases of married stu-!
dents and graduates.

With the announcement that
Lott will take over the singles
burden along with Bill Tilden in'
the coming final round of the Davis
Cup play with France and the in-
ability of Lacoste to compete for
the Tricolor in-= her defense of
sportsdom's most sought after tro-
phy the stock of the challengersI
took a distinct rise.
The so-ection of Lott over
Hunter for the second singles
berthnon the American team
was one which camne as a dis-
tinct surprise in view of the
fact that Hunter had flashed
the most powerful tennis of his
long career in his play against
Penn and Moldenhauer of Ger-
many, in the interzone finals
last week end at Berein.
Lott with his powerful, though
unorthodox game, has failed to
reach his attainments of other sea-
sons. In his only appearance
against members of the French
lineup the Western Conference
champion was defeated rather
handily by Borotra at Wimbledon
in the quarter finals of the singles.
Despite his many years of in-
ternational experience Lott is
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that the Chicagoan was se-ect-
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men which the United States
will send into play only Bill
Tilden has not many more
years of top notch pay remain-
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WANTED
MALE HELP WAdNT E CD-Four
young men for Advertising Cam-
paign. Spare time work. Apply
220 Nickels Arcade. Tues. 1-4.
WANTED-Fraternity interested in
buying large home ideally lo-
cated southeast of campus. See
owner at 928 Oakland for plans
for enlarging house, terms, etc.

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CANOEING
Every Afternoon and Evening
Saunders' Canoe Livery
On the Huron River at the foot of Cedar St.

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