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July 24, 1929 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1929-07-24

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THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAIL\

WEDNESDAY, JULY 24, 1929

U I,-

us4rOmmer
Published every morning except Monday
during the University Summer Session by
the Board in Control of Student Publications.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news pub-
lished herein.
Entered at the Ann Arbor, Michigan,
postoffice as second class matter.
Subscription by carrier. $r.5o; by mail
$2.00
Offices: Press Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan.!
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
LAWRENCE R. KLEIN
Editorial Director..........Howard F. Shout
Women's Editor ...........Margaret Eckels
City Editor................Charles Askrea
Music and Drama Editor.. R. Leslie Askren
Books Editor............Lawrence R. Klein
Sports Editor............S. Cadwell Swanson
Night Editorsl
Howard 2. Shout Walter Wilds
S. Cadwell Swanson Harold Warren
CharlesAskren
Assistants

after all, they are limited by the
desires of the people themselves.
The South should learn to look at
itself from the viewpoint =of an out-
sider, and perhaps it would realize
the seeming paradox of its two
traditions-one of adherence to the
laws which it has recognized, the
other a passion for violence and
bloodshed without the atoning mer-
cy of the courts.
0
HIS HONOR STEPS (DOWN

o 0
Music And Drama
0
TONIGHT: The Michigan Re-
pertory Players present Willard
Mack's melodrama "Kick-In"
in Mendelssohn Theater begin-
ning at 8:15 o'clock.
A RESIGNATION

THE
FASHION j
Fitting one's clothes to one's en-
vironment is an art supposedly
practised by many women, but only
achieved by a few. Knowing when
and where to wear what you wear
is a universal formula for chic.
The time, the place, and the cos-

Detiance Tires
Reduced in Price
In Our Bargain Basement

fume should be in

accord.

Ben Manson
RosstGustin
Dorothy Magee

Ledru Davis
Margaret Harris
William Mahey
Paul Showers

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
LAWRENCE E. WALKLEY
Assistant Business Manager..........Vernor Davis
Publications Manager...........Egbert Davis
Circulation Manager............Jeanette Dale}
Accounts Manager..................Noah Bryant
WEDNESDAY, JULY 24, 1929
Night Editor- Charles A. Askren
THE DIVIDED SOUTH
It sems to us that the time has
come for something to be said con-
cerning the lawless lynching par-
ties that are held with an ominous
regularity in the South. Lynchings
have occured in other sections, al-
though they have been almost un-
known of late, but Southern mob-
parties have continued as in the
days before the civil war and, have'
even seemed to increase.
Perhaps it is true, as some of the
inhabitants of Dixie charge, that
we do not understand or appreciateI
conditions down there-perhaps al-
'--o11 orvi ni i Vhi n dl byuli c

Editorial opinions seldom find This is to announce that for All of whichI
universal approval; in fact, the the remainder of the Summer is by way of
opinion would be worth very little Session I shall not be connect- s a y in g t hat
if every one of its readers did agree
with it. However, the press from ed in any way with the edi- women s houa
wihi.Hwvrtepesfo be oethan
time immemorial has had a cer- 1 torial policies of this column.
careful of
tain liberty of expression-limited It may be that in the course what they wear
only by the dictates of decency and of events " occasional articles in the country
reason-which is immune from the on their sum-
wrath of all the potentates and which already have been ar-er s
. ranged for will prove accepta- mer vacations.
authorities who attempt to controlOrhids are
the course of affairs. ble to the succeeding editor, onl ridiculous
Ignoring all this, a Cleveland who may print them, but that in a haystack, where blue overalls
judge has recently taken it upon matter will be for his decision. have a genuine charm.
himself to call before the bar of
justice an editor and an editorial R. Leslie Askren The materials most favored by
writer because they had presumed* * 4Paris for the country bound vaca-
writirizeaudeiseothey heumed Htionist this summer are ginghams,
to criticize a decision which he had THE TATTERMAN MARIONETTES cithmsu n nte ol
'1CATERYk~eT MRIOETTS ichintz, homespun and knitted wool-
made. It is difficult to find any Monday afternoon of next week ens, and such silks as shantung,
other motive in this action than the Tatterman Marionettes will sheer China silk, and silk linen.
petty anger. His Honor apparent-t
ly considered himself and his po- present John Ruskin's delightful Comfort is the keynote of line.
siticonstoohigh tohmefsubet to-he tale, "The King of the Golden Riv- Skirts and sleeves are short, the
skirts being wide enough to allow
comments of the newspapers. He er," in Mendelssohn Theater. imlfre dm eforgwalknglcom
apparently wanted his activities as A puppet show is an annual andfoalyfandothe sleeves om
ap c aa fortably, and the sleeves sometimes
S ud-enthusiastically attended affair in being eliminated altogether. Trim-
ment of the law to be kept in the Ann Arbor; so enthusiastically, in mings are reduced to almost neglig-
shadow of obscurity, free from the
eyes of an inquiring or questioning 1 fact, that it has been the source of ible importance. Cotton gloves
and stockings are details which are
people. ( some surprise that more puppet important for the summer vaca-
No judicial, administrative, or companies have not placed Ann tionist. The flare for cotton has
legislative officer is free from the Arbor on their itinerary. However, also spread to parasols and veils
probing finger of the press; his af-
fairs are, and should be, an open I some of the finest companies have to cover sensitive complexions.
book for all to read. When he pro- given performances here, including Colors for country run riot.
tests, he is protesting only against Helen Joseph's Puppets, and Jean Warm, even crude, shades are the
'aGsmart ones for the rural resort.
the unpleasant qualities in his of- Gros' Marionettes, and this spring Bright blues, rich browns, vivid yel-
fice; when he acts against his crit- the Yale Puppetteers, who are more lows, pure untoned whites, and
ics, he is abusing the privileges of properly Forman Brown and Fran- greens in every natural nuance are
his position. There is a divine right cis Burnett, both graduates of the smartest tones.
of freedom vested in the presscte fate os
which must be respected by every- Michigan, gave a series of per- One of the most important items
i in the country wardrobe is the
one; and His Honor is not except- formances that were distinguished warm, comfortable coat. Also in
ed. i by great skill and sensitivity of in- vivid colors, it is usually made of
vii0oos ti sal aeo

30x3 ce........
30x3 % 2 -c........
30x3% Giant ....
30x3% 2s. s........
31x4 ...........
32x4 ............
33x4 ..........
32x4 . 2
33x4 2 ........
34X4 2 ..........
35x5 ...........
30x5 heavy duty..

1
7
J
S
J
Ij
I
r
S
7 7
.1
f

29x4.40-21 . . ...............
29x4.50-20 ........... ,.
30x4.50-21................
28x4.75-19.............-.-..- '
29x4.75-20....... .............
34x4.75-21 .................
29x5.00-19 ..................
30x5.00-20 .................
31x5.00-21 .................
28x5.25-18 .................
29x5.25-19.................
30x5.25-20 .................
31x5.25-21 .................
29x5.50-19.
30x5.50-20 .................
30x6.00-18 - . ...... -....
31x6.00-19 .................
32x6.00-20 ..................
33x6.00-21-..................
32x6.75-20 6 ply .............
33x6.75-21 6 ply.............

Cords
High
Pressure.
.$ 4.75
- - - - 4.95
. .... 5.10
.. . ... 6.45
.. . ... 8.75
9.45
9.75
.. 13.25
..... 13.45
... 13.75
.. .1... 6.95
.19.45

Balloons
$ 5.85
6.35
6.55
7.85
7.95
8.25
8.50
8.70
8.95
9.35
9.65
9.85
10.15
10.45
10.65
12.25
12.65
12.95
13.45
17.25
17.75

Laminated
Red
Tubes
$ .85
1.00
1.10
1.10
1.45
1.50
1.55
1.75
1.85
1.95
2.25
2.25
Tubes
$1.15
1.20
1.20
1.35
1.40
1.45
1.50
1.55
1.60
1.65
1.70
1.75
1.80
1.85
1.90
2.00
2.05
2.20
2.25
3.00
3.10

t
i
i
i

If the Chinese treat the Rus-
sians like they do our shirts, it will
be a ragged looking army that hiesI
itself back to old Moscow.

so our viewpoint is blased oy as-b
torted press reports. However, as- Twenty-eight farmer's wives in
suming all these things to be true, Illinois recently returned from
the fact of frequent mob violences their annual Adamless vacation.
in that portion of the country can Well, its up and Adam now, boys.
not be disputed. We do not mean o
to criticise where criticism is not

i

deserved, nor do we fail to realizej
that the northern "hex-murders"
and gang wars place us in a posi-
tion open to adverse comment, but
a situation which outrages all the,
decency and sanity of the civiliza-
tion we have established is not sub-
ject to these difficulties. g e
Innumerable incidents might be
cited in which the passions of the
people have rushed them into re-
gretable violences; the latest of
these is the threat of mob action
which is being made by the citi-
zens of Birmingham toward thel
person of Lester Bouyer, a negro,
who is alleged to be the slayer of
Jack Hines, a mechanic, and who,
is said to be guilty also of an at-
tack on an eighteen year old girl
who was accompanying Hines.
Nothing definite has been proved
against this new victim, but then,
a little suffices in Birmingham.
Bouyer has not been arraigned
before the grand jury as yet, and
his case still hangs in the balance
between specific charges and gen-
eral complaints. However, the cit-
izenry does not need definite
charges-the slightest hint of a
crime, and they begin to uncoil
their well-worn ropes. There is
little reason to wonder that such
an attitude is beginning to arouse!
disgust in other sections.
One of the first things that is
done by respectable men and wo-
men in colonizing a new district
is the establishment of law and
order. It is a first requisite to the
founding of a community, and a
boon to further progress. But, if
those who build up a system of law
and order choose to disregard it to
the extent of murder, there is no#
choice but to consider that com-
munity barbarous and uncivilized.
If this is as far as a century of hu-
manitarian ideals has carried us,
we can have little hope for the fu-
ture.
State governments in the South
do what they can to preserve the
elirv~+1 n" r~es~r ^ fa n in:: 1 -4-

A boa constrictor in a New Yorkj
Zoo has swallowed a blanket, ac-
cording to a late news report. Wej
can remember some nights last
winter when we would have taken
them internally too.
0-
They are always talking about a
debt accord in France, but up until
very recently, we could find littleI
to call accord in the debt argu-
ments in the sister republic.

Editorial Comment

i

WHAT IS UNEMPLOYMENT?
(From The Toledo Blade)
The United States is unprece-
dentedly prosperous, and yet it is1
estimated that the number of un-
employed adult persons in this
country is from 1,500,000 to 8,000,-
000.
There are two reasons for the
wide range of opinion. No unem-
ployment census has been taken
and there is no general agreement
upon what unemployment means.
If cripples, invalids, college grad-
uates, and others who have never
been gainfully employed, house-
wives who seek only to earn pin
money, stenographers who have
quit their jobs to marry, and part
time workers are included in the
calculation, the number of the un-
employed will appear very much
larger than if only persons who
are mentally and physically able to
work, who usually work and who
cannot find employment, are in-j
cluded in the enumeration.'
Tentative plans for an unem-
ployment census on the latter ba-
sis are being considered by a small
executive committee of leaders of
capital and labor in various fields
appointed by Secretary of Com-
merce Lamont.
The. basic facts thus obtained
would be inestimably useful for fur-
ther consideration of unemploy-
ment as a social, economic, and

terpretation.
The Tatterman Marionettes is an
organization founded in 1923 and
controlled by William Duncan and
Edward Mabley of Detroit. They
have given some two thousand per-
formances since their inception and
the reception given them has been
uniformly enthusiastic. Duncan
and Mabley have chiefly been con-
cerned with managing and produc-
ing the shows, Mabley handling
matters of design in set, costume,
and puppet figure and both of them
executing the plans. For their plays
the producers have associated with
them Miss Catherine Reighard of
New York city and recently a grad-
uate from~ Prof. George Baker's "47
Workshop" at Yale. Miss Reighard
is a member of the class of '15 at
the University of Michigan, from
which her interest in the drama led
her to Yale. The repertoire of the
Tatterman Marionettes includes a
number of Miss Reighard's original
plays and adaptations by her of
prose stories, the best of which ap-
pear in "Plays for People and Pup-
pets" which E. P. Dutton & Co. have
published. In reviewing the book
the New York Herold Tribune plac-
ed it among the "fifty best books
for 1928." "The King of tlpe Golden
River" which is being offered Mon-
day afternoon, is from this collec-
tion.
. The repertoire of the Tatterman
Marionettes includes plays for
adults as well as for the juvenile
taste. They include; "On The
Stairs," an ironic tragedy arranged
from the story by Arthur Morri-
son; "Our Lady's Tumbler," a new
and delicate treatment of the med-
ieval legend first made familiar
by Boccaccio and Anatole France.
"The Melon Thief," a Japanese Kio-
gen Interlude-farce, staged in the
traditional manner of the ancient
Japanese theater; "Washington
Square," a fantastic pantomime of
real people. All the arrangements
are by Catherine Reighard.'
"The King of the Golden River"
which is the only production the
company will be able to present,
although directly appealing to the
juvenile taste, should have consid-
erable interest for the adult in the
delicacy of the Ruskin fantasy and
the sophistication of simplicity,
which comes after the craving for
realism in the gradus ad Parnas-

IlL

homespun or tweed. It has capac-j
ious pockets, and is often ornamen-
tal with a detachable scarf.
IOWA.-An equitable plan of
ticket distribution has been worked
i out for the University of Iowa's
conference football games next
fall, whereby yearly ticket holders,
alumni, and non-alumni, all have
as many seats on the 50-yard line j
I or on either side as any other one
group. Newspapermen will be placed1
in a central area on the west side.
Some 1,200 seats will be held for
supporters of the visiting teams.

RY
READ THE DAILY CLASSIFIEDS!

I11, ---- nil

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Summrer School Special!10
250 BOXES
MICHIGAN SEAL STATIONERY
49c

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UNIVERSITY
BOO KSTORE

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