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June 18, 1928 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1928-06-18

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PAGE TWO

THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY

MONDAY, JUNE 18, 1928

17 PI i umnr vancement of science of many kinds.
They have seen the Women's League
MI a tU w a tUI V building assume the proportions of an
Published every morning except Monday dur- institution which 'has been the dream
ing the University Summer Session by the of every woman who has graduated
Board in Control of Student Publications.
from the University. And they have
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication of all news seen the imposing building which now
dispatches credited to it or not otherwise houses the Architectural College. All
credited in this paper and the local news
published herein, of these material improvements are
Entered at the Ann Arbor, Michigan, post- possible because of the unfailing
office as second class matter. spirit they have displayed at all
Subscription by carrier, $1.50; by mail, $1.75
Offices: Press Building, Maynard Street, times.
Ann Arbor, Michigan. As spectators they have watched1
EDITORIAL STAFF the impressive ceremonies of the
Telephone 4925 graduation of nearly 2,000 young men'
-and women, and as observers they
MANAGING EDITO'R have seen life in many respects as
J. STEWART HOOKER they once knew it.
Editorial Directors.........George E. Simons It is to be hoped that as they re-
Martin MolI .o.h
City Editor. ..............Lawrence R. Klein turn in the future they will be ableJ
E'eature Editor...............Eleanor Scribner t
Music and Drama Editor......Stratton Buck to note with pride as we hope they
Books Editors............Kenneth G. Patrick have this year, the progress of a uni-
Kathryn Sayer versity beloved by all who have. car-
Night Editors ried with them the spirit of their
Alex Bochnowski Martin Mol Alma Mater.
George E. Simons
Reporters
Margaret Arthur eIsabel Charles THE BIG SHOW
Bertram Askwith Howard F. Shout The curtain has been rung down on
Raymond Bridges Jack Sumner
Raymnd__rdges _ Jack____ner what was perhaps the most conspicu-
BUSINESS STAFF l ous show of national importance so
Telephone 21214 far this year-the Republican na-1
tional nominating convention of 1928;
BUSINESS MANAGER and, although the "big tent" gas beenj
RAY WACHTERItemporarily dissembled, it will be
Advertising..............Lawrence Walkley transferred, reconstructed and talked
Accounts.................Whitney Manninglabout at various parts of the country
Circulation.................Bessie V. Egeland.
Assistants until a certain day in November when
Samuel Lukens Hanna Wallen
Jeanette Dale Lillian Korviuskey returns are forthcoming-as fir as
the G. O. P. is concerned at least.
Issue EditorCHARLES S. MONROE Although the national spotlight was
focused on the convention hall in
AID-_Kansas City, the happenings there-
A LL the act, so to speak-brought forth
Today MichigAn bs farewell d nothing that will linger long or viv-
God dtMichigan bith are,7welglad-idly in the heart of the nation, for
Godspeed to more than 1,700 gradu- the simple reason that the convention
ates who, upon graduation, become!did the expected; it nominated Her-
members of the great body of Michi- bert Hoover. Whether or not it
gan Alumni, and who from now ongh named the next president of the Unit-
must be guided by their own thoughts ed States is something that cannot be
and by the ideas they may carry away determined until next fall. In the
with them rather than relying uponI meantime there are a greatmany
the advice of close associates and persons whoIfeel that Mr. Hoover's
teachers. They must all outline their rating with th people of this country
independent lives in a way both pleas- is such as to give the Democrats of
ing to the individual and satisfactorys of this democracy plenty of cause for
to society. concern. Certain it is that Mr. Hoov-
The , group which graduated this er boasts an enviable record, one that1
tnnrnna txac a ~nct ncmnnlitin

1,750 NORE
ALUMNI GET
STADIUM SEATS
Every year it gets tougher for the
remaining student body, for each year
about 2,000 more seniors graduate
and become alumni and get seats be-!
tween the goal posts.
Pretty soon there won't be seats!
enough for the student body at all.
"If this does come to pass," said Har-
ry Tillotson, business manager for
the athletic association, "we will
have to ban students from attending
games, and devote the entire stadium
to cash customers. Perhaps we can I
arrange to allow students to see their
team in action at two practice ses-
sions a week, at a nominal cost."
* * *
Various professors of promi-
nence have uttered opinions
about the class about to be
graduated. The managing editor I
made us cut those that were too
insulting and the one that was'
flattering.
Professor Hobbs: . I am glad
that I am in Greenland.
"Dean Emery: I put them on
their feet.
"Professor" Yost:. 'Athletics for
all' put them through, don't ya'
see?
* * *
Beginning tonight, every senior
will devote one hour each day be-
fore retiring to placing both thumbs
under his suspenders, standing erect,
and practicing to say, "Now, in my
undergraduate days. .
A fellow dropped into the office yes-
terday and told us that Lark was a
good name for us. "Lark," he said,
"is the name of a small and rather
unimportant bird that can't sing,:
makes a lot of noise, and doesn't say
very much."
Reward of eight cylinder sport
roadster, any make, to the man or
woman who can tell me a reason
for the auto ban.
. *--Joe Zilch.
"Of course," the just-graduated
senior told us late today, "I shall al-
ways regard the feelings of the stu-
dent body, but I am beginning to
realize more and more that the stu-
dent viewpoint is all wrong and that
the welfare of the University demands

One Block North from
Hill Auditorium

Ir 1

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Our Special
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Are Delicious

Breakfast ... .
Lunch.....
Dinner . . .....
Sunday Dinner

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. 50c
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ll

I'- '

ONE MORE FINAL

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The House of Quality
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AND
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212 South Main Phone 6666

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G

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Open Till 12 Tonight Only

One-fourth Off
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Gifts for the Graduate
GIFTS OF JEWELRY are always welcome.
May we show you our delightful selection of
jewelry which is most appropriate and beau-
tiful.
PINS PENDANTS RINGS BEADS
WA TCHES BRACELETS
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morning was a most cosmopolian
group with many and divers interests.1
Not even in large cities could a groupl
be found who were any less homo-
geneous in experience, social stand-
ing, ambition, and intellect. But even
though the interests are as widely
separated as are those of the popula-
tion of a great city, each member of
the graduating class has one thing in
common, the years spent at Michi-
gan. If they. have made the best of
their opportunities4 they have improv-
. ed themselves by their associations
as well as by their academic work and
have broadened themselves so that
they may achieve success not only
from a business or professional.
standpoint, but also from a social
point of view. Not only should they
have improved their intellect,. but
they -should have received much so-
cial benefit during their college
course.

should go far toward turning things!
his way in the elections. His record
as wartime food-administrator cast
him considerably into the public eye
-and he stood the test of observation
at a crucial time. His career as sec-
retary of commerce under Presidents
Harding and Coolidge also will stand
him in good stead; and, lastly, it isI
significant that he was nominated on,
the first ballot-by a virtual land-
slide.
Not only has Wr. Hoover a substan-
tial record behind him, but the Hoov-
er-Curtis combine has also a not in-
cornsiderable or by any means insig-
nificant platform backing it up, as the
result of -the events preceding their
nominations at the Kansas City con-
vention. On the strength of that plat-
form the compination may rise or
fall. In it are included everything
from agriculture and prohibition to
public utilities and national defense-

I

Ann Arbor Folks _By C. R. Perry

more mature guidance
ad nauseam,
OUR BEST LOOKING
WOMEN

." etc.,

.,YEP, TOMM Y
i S WAY TALLER
. T'yK T-4 YOU,
BUD -
CTMERE-
DIDN'T
.... TELLYA
sv 1
0 '

S-A -
,t ,E~

I h0'
StorT E

I AIN'T TA.LL ANY MORE
SINCE MA .G-OT THAT
~HAIR GROOM" FROM
.r5 C.L KCO.
_ANSD MADE N
00OM 6 M"-
HAI I

-I

MEN ARE

\E

Success in any line, however, is not1 too comprehensive a subject for one
something which becomes inevitable editorial. Too, the meaty' address giv-
with the winning of a diploma. Suc- en by the keynote speaker, Senator
cess will depend for allyof the gradu- Fess, of Ohio, has been recorded as
ates upon the use they are able to Igood evidence of the fact that the
make of the knowledge which they ! Republicans have not reached the
have acquired at college, and especial- stagnant stage; they are thinking,
ly upon their ability to think and to they are planning; they will bear
work. Having learned these things watching between nrw and November.
they should be a credit to Michigan Thus, while "the big; show"mwas
in whatever they may do. Iby no means sensational, it worked
The responsibility of being a credit! steadily toward the goal it set for
to Michigan which is automatically itself; the drawing up of a sound,
thrown upon everyhalumnus is not asubstantial platformtand thecnomis
wihon.eahman's pesnaiydsrelceath tion of a man worthy to carry its
woman's personality is reflected the banners in the coming presidential
ihass personality of a great universi- campaign. Should the Democrats at
ty, and although that should not Houston accomplish as much there
erase Individuality it should be strong should be considerable static in the
enough to Barry the Michigan spirit air between that time and next fall.
of good sportsmanship and loyalty'
into whatever field he or she may
enter. Whatever the graduates may EDITORIAL COMMENT
do they will enter upon a career in
which it is their sacred duty to en-
hance the glorious reputation that WHY GO TO COLLEGE
has been built up by years of effort (Toledo Blade)-
for the University of Michigan. "The majority are inspired by a
wish to gain or maintain special
UNTIL NEXT YEAR recognition or to enjoy athletics and
As we bid farewell to the members friendships."
of the class of 1928, we also say good- The college student council made
bye for another year to the alumni this report at the Yale faculty study

r
i
3!
1
s
r
r
Z
t
.I

t7 -
I I mow
. 0*
That's a good add for the J. G. P.
but some of those same manly women
want to be careful and not take the
signs too seriously. The above pro-
tograph was taken of a former mem-
ber of the J. G. P. cast. It was her
last pose.

m

Success in school, business, and life itself depends upon personal appearance.
Our policy of conducting a clean-cut business appeals to everybody. Stand-
ard drugs and toilet accessories of dependability.
Calkins-Fletcher Drug Store
3 Dependable Stores
We Have Served Michigan and Her Students for 40 Years

I

yl________________

* * *
PHI BETE RCESIG

Above is an action pict
by the ROLLS PHOTOS,
of the World" of a member
graduating class resigning
first position. It is said th
atmosphere was entirely la
Phi Betes are academic9
else.

THERE IS
about one of

something so
Commencem

N'S
Back Goes the Top <
V.'..-
T the Roadster-
ture taken-T
"The Lies .1
of the 19281'
from his
e academic = And soon you are slipping away down the smooth motor road-your smart
cking, and luggage in the back of the car filled with sports and colorful playtime clothes.
if nothing = To the cool mountains, to far-off countries, of perhaps to the seashore, vibrant
c with life and gaiety, vivd with color, abuzz with the voices of happy bathers
inspiring mingled with the splashing and lapping of the surf-the beach-what a color-
ent week- ful array it presents!
graduates.
how all of The success of a trip such as this is evidenced in an invitation to come again,
ill have to
it inspires -which the correctly costumed girl is always certain of receiving. The smart-
k another est and newest styles are found here. To you the graduates of 1928, we
welcome your return at any time. We wish to service you again.
aduation
conse- - *
Infested 2
re bond
clerks,
wo men
y have to Established 1857 Ann Arbor
-L ark. jl il liillli illIlliilltllilll 1 [ tlllilHllinl lln in lit~ulltl[1111t11[nt ii l u trl in m

who have gathered to relive as much
as possible those memorable days of
their youth. As a representation of
the largest body of graduates pos-
sessed by any university, the visiting
alumni form an immense delegation
to investigate and to observe the
progress of their Alma Mater.
Within their own group they have
conducted their reunion program with
much success, and it has been a pro-
gram in which many more have par-
ticipated than in many years past.
Upon investigation they have found
several great developments in the
material phase of the University. They
have witnessed the formal opening of
a museum building containing price-
less exhibits, laboratories for the ad-.

of the motives which prompt students
to enter college.
This confession from Yale proves
pretty well that John D. Rockefeller,
Jr., was stating facts and not dealing
with sensationalism when he said,
in an address at a recent university
commencement, that many young
folks who go to college would do bet-
ter at useful work in home towns.
True enough, if they could be in-
duced to do useful work anywhere,
but the drones and those who sing
"I'd be a Butterfly," are not permitted
to impede the progress of those
earnest, industrious students who go
to college to get equipment for doing
the best and most useful work of the
world.

ends for we mere under
When we stop to think of 1
those black robed people w
work to keep from working,
us to sit back and flun]
course.
** *
And so one more gr
has taken place. As a
quence, the world will be
for awhile with 1,654 mo
salesmen, 50 more bank
48 more professors, and t
who really lwork.
Ha, ha. Now you really
work.

i

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