100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

June 18, 1928 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1928-06-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

L7, 4 f

'umrr

WJ ATHER
Mostly cloudy this after-
noon and totight; probably
CO[ l.',toil ig.1. Toi ~ao
nilertailn.

gilt4b

"IN . . .._ L _ i w

COMMENCEMENT

I
A

OL.VIX, No. 1

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, MONDAY, JUNE 18, 1928

GEST

CL

I

i

I

REGENTS 'FORM
NEW CALENDAR
FOR0 NEXT YEAR]
ACCEPT DAY'S RESIGNATION AND
APPOINT RIUTIIVEN AS
SUCCESSORL
GRIFFIN WILL CONTINUE
Board Names Executive Committee
For New University College.
To Be Organized Soon
Granting the request of the Univer-
sity senate, the Board of Regents at
their annual meeting last Friday night
advanced the academic calendar one
week so that classes will be resumed
one week later next fall, the date be-
ing Monday, September 24. The sec-
ond .semester will be shortened one
week._
The resignation of Edmund E. Day
as dean of the School of Business Ad-
ministration was accepted, and Dr.
Alexander G. Ruthven, director of the
University museums.and head of the
zoolbgy department, was appointed to
succeed him. Prof. Clare E. Griffin
will continue as acting dean of the
School of Business Administration
during 1928-29.
Members of the executive 6ommit-
tee of the University college which
will be organized next year were an-
rixounced as follows: Prof. Phillip E.
Bursley, of the language department;
Prof. John G. Winter, of the Greek
department; Prof. Arthur L. Cross
and Prof. William G. Frayer, of the
history department; Prof. Clarence S.
Yoakum, of the School of Business
Administratiol; Prof. Lewis M. Gram
and Prof. William C. Road, of the
civil engineering department; Prof. E.
C. Case, of the geology department;.
Prof. Louis A.4 Strauss, of the English
department; and, Ira M. Smith, Uni-
versity registrar.
Prof. Charles F. Remer, of Williams
college, was appointed professor of
economics.
In the rhetoric department, Harold
C. Binkley was promoted from an in-
structorship to an assistant professor-
ship; Harold G. Baker, of Albion col-
lege, was made instrutor; and K n-;
neth T. Rowe, of the University of ,
Oregon, was given an assistant profes-
sorship.
FRAYER GIES PLANS
YFOR FRSHMAN WEEK~
Tentative plans for the 1928 Fresh-
man Week have been announced by
Prof. William A. Frayer of the His-
tory department, chairman of theY
Freshman Week Committee. The plans
to be carried out next fall follow
closely those which were carried out
.last fall except for the fact that divi-
sion into groups according to interest
will be stressed. Social featres will
also form a large part of the programe
as outlined.
In the pre-professional groups, Prof.I

Arthur D. Moore will head the pros-I
pective engineers; Prof. George M.C
McConkey will lead the advisory
group for architectural students; Prof.r
Clifford C. Glover will be chairman of
the pharmacy group; Prof. Waldoc
Abbot for the pre-law students; Prof.c
William G. Smeaton will be chairman
of the group of advisors for pre-med-
ical and pre-dental students; Prof.-
Carter Goodrich will head the pre-t
business; Dr. Carl E. Guthe will takel
charge of those interested in sciences;
Prof. Elmer D. Mitchell will head ther
physical education group; and Pro-8
fessors John W. Bradshaw andY
Philip E. Bursley will head two gen-c
eral groups.1

Hono Gari~wit~h~ AIR[ T IDT[IILittle Adopts Fi.
As Doctor of Music' ,; 11L111 LI Of Comman'dm
For Text of Sei
Taking the "paternalis
charmingly platudinous" fif
mandment as his text,
Clarence Cook Little empha
true meaning of "motherh(
RECIPIENTS INCLUDE TWELVE "fatherhood" in his third I
MEN, ONE WOMAN; IS LARGEST reate address, given yesterdf
NUMBER IN YEARS ing in Hill auditorium.-
"The motherhood of the e
sea, the sky, bf the state, th
GABRILOWITSC IS CITED the University--things which
Ossip Gabrilowitsch or are a part in mutual affe
Rowell, Stevens Strawn, Kettering, sympathy-the fatherhood of
Leader of the Detroit Symphony or- Clapp, %ilbreth, Heiss -and I forces of race, of Nature an
chestra, and well-known pianist, who Others Get D egrees1our own smallness, inadequ
was honored with a degree of Doctor need of brotherhood-these t
of Music at the 84th annual Com- absolutely essential to every
mencement exercises this morning. Thirteenthonorary degrees were ed man or woman," Preside
_________ awarded to twelve men and onej declared.
wojnan this morning during the ex-d .
R [[JNijK A TIT NDANC[ ercises of the eighty-fourth Commen- President Discusses Mothe
cement day. This is the largest num- President Little quoted h
'er to be awarded in recent years, "Honor thy father and thy
Hrin.. [S 1 f0and those to whom they were award- that thy days may be lon,
ed'represent several diversified. fields land which the Lord thy G
. of activity. EAthee," and sought to show
Social Events And Meetings Occupy Prof. John G. Winter presented the change, dependent upon the
Time Of Alumni; University honorary degrees to the rebiplents our individual and racial c
Movie Fails To Come with the following citations: ness has been greatly enlv
-*"Master of Science: Wilbur Lin- tended and enriched by our
MANY REMAIN FOR TODAY oln' Scoville, a graduate of the Mas- with many new things and n
sachusetts College of Pharmacy in tried situations, has been m

EDITION
PRICE FIVE CENT
GRA0 UAlTED
efts
gets1iLAR6E COMMENCEMENT CROWD
rmoni HEARS CHESTER H, ROWELL, '2
tic and'
th com-
President
sized the
ood' and
Baccalau- "YOUR PIONEER GENERATION" IS SUB-
ay morn-JECT OF ADDRESS BEFORE
arth, the SENIORS
e nation,
we were With t'heir colored tassels of varied hues adding the touch of color to the
ction and somber robes signifying an end to college work, the eighty-fourth class to be
the great gradunated from the University met for the last time in Yost Field Hu.se this
d of God, morning 'and took their places in the specially reserved section. The weather
uacy and was rainy. They heard Chester H. Rowell, '88, now a Regent of the Unriversity
hings are of Californi, deliver tlhie'commencement address, saw several persons famous
y educat- in their ch:sen fields receive honorary degrees, and marched up to take their
nt Little diplonma.s from the hands of President Clarence Cook Little. More than 2,000
seniors, the largest class ever to be graduated, had entered the- r-anrks of
erhood alumni.
~rhod _____________________________ In delivering the main address of
his text, the morning, Rowell addressed the
mother ATr graduation class as the first genera-
g in theSPRTAN l I L IPS tion of an educated democracy.
d giveth "When we graduated," he said, "we
thought of ourselves as the second
fact that 9.LTf l41IJpioneers, and felt sorry for you that
onscious- there was nothing more toconquer.
ened, ex- But we were just beginning. It is
r contact Avenge Defeat Of Friday At Ferry up to the next generation to readjust
many un- Field By Handing Michigan the world of thought and faith to the
anifested Third Season Loss .. ! e rn-, of' lzr. 1. l..' -t,.

i
CC
re
.r
Lit

the class of 1889, and Professor at in regard to the conception of the
Although the attendance at the an-I
nual Alumni reunions has been much that institution for many years. As words "father" and "mother.' LAST GAME
Research Chemist of Parke, Davis President Little averred that thereLFOR Dl'ME
ores than 1 200gradu tesranicpted, and Company since 1907 and head of are many forms of Motherhood, andf
during the time that the registration its Analytical Department since 1924, not the least among them being "one After nearly tumbling the Wolver-
Office was open during alumni wek- he has won an acknowledged position which is of especial interest to us ines. in their last appearance of the1
etnd. Charles J. Rash, '19, was in in his profession. Chosen repeatedly today. It includes the relationships sanson at Ferry Field Friday, the'
charge of the affair which followed 1by his colleagues to serve on comit- betw en universities and the students lichigan State baseball nine, handed
tees for the revision of the National who tattend them," the speaker said.!
a varied program of social events and Formulary and the United States "The recognition of one's college is the Conference champions a 9 to 4 I
thityeight c'asses whichngere tho Pharmacopoeia, he has helped to im- a source of unalterable joy and in- defeat at East Lansing, Saturday a-
prove these standard works. His spiration to tens of thousands of stu- ternoon. It was 4he third defeat of1
visit Ann Arbor. ' . contributions to scientific literature rents and alumni, the season for Michigan, two of them
Frdywstknu ihahave been many, and his Art of Coin- Tu fcmigi h at tregms
luncheon at noon given at BetsytBar- "Is Same True of FatherhoodI coming in the last three games.
pounding, now in its fifth edition, is
bour house, the baseball game in the authoritative in the field of prescrip- "We have considered motherhood Michigan State realized a long-
afternoon with the Michigan State atitivetin and the vast growth of its significance cherished dream by taking advantage1
tive practice. an
team, and the all-Alumni sing which Iin life of the world since the fifth of Fred Asbeck's wildness and, al-
tem n-hMalAun in hc iaster of Architecture: George;,oFrdAbcswinesaal
took place about 9 o'clock Friday De Witt Mason, of Detroit, an ar- commandment was written;" Presi- though out hit, 8 to 7 by the invaders,
night on the steps of Angell hall and Ident Little went on to say, "Is thed,
chitect whose name is familiarly'
at which the Varsity band played a k same true of fatherhood? As a gene-
short concert and the accompaniment Ion. t hme mbesois pr ral thing it has suggested activity, managed to go the full route for,
fession. Numerous buildings bear'
to the singing which was led by Kemp witness to his mastery of design, and power and aggressiveness to a great- Michigan State by getting good sup-
Kenna of Union Opera fame. stand as memorials to noble thought er degree. The greatest and noblest nort from the field."
A business meeting was held Satur- embodied in enduring form. conception of fatherhood that has The game also saw the passing ofj
day morning in Hill auditorium at come to the world, however, is to be Bennie Oosterbaan, who turned in his
which the reports of the various sec- Hater, of rt atrspolgte found in the life and' teachings of last game in a Michigan uniform.
retaries were heard together with the Harper, an expert and scholarly bib- Christ. A short but magnificent life And, although the versatile 'Bennie
report given by President Clarence liographer, who for forty-four years full of the love of mankind as a failed to come through with that tra-
Cook Little. Another meeting was brother and of God as father, has lit- ditional home run, he smashed out a
scheduled for the afternoon at which priceless service to collectors and un- erally "overcome the world. These triple and two singles in five trips tok
sceue o h feno tw ich st nterrr hnssol e nitga ato
the University mdvie was to be shown. iversities n ther 'pursuits of ,are things should be an integral part of the plate. The crowd gave him a'
material. Untiring in his search for, o syucm oyu omne
During the latter part of the after- h.gelp you as you come to your Commence- great ovation when he stepped to the
noon several teas were given by the unique possessions he has helped ment, for on and with you rests the Mlate for the last time, and he re-
various organizations on the campus in no small measure, to build up the responsibility of guarding and nur- sponded with a sizzling single. ,
notable collections of Americana, in- turing the things in life that really
whose former members had returned cluding the one which gives to Michi- count The Wolverines took a two run lead
for the reunion, and in the evening gan a special distinction and renown. in the first inning, but began to slip!
several private banquets were held. With high appreciation of his exact- In concluding the Baccalaureate in the fourth when the home nine;
A concert by the Varsity band given ing standards and his eminence in his address, President Little said, "It pushed four runs across the plate,'
from 8 o'clock until 10 o'clock on the chosen field, the University now wel- ould have been so easy in this hour three coming at the result of Byrn's
campus, and-the Senate reception held comes- him among her alumni. to have paid you compliments that four-ply swat with two men on the1
in Waterman and Barbour gymna- "Charles Augustus Heiss, a gradu- are due of youth and beauty and paths. Captain Loos, of Michigan,
siums concluded the program. strength, so easy to have spent the also contributed a homer, with no
ate of George Washington university time trying to tell of the great hope man on base
Many of the visiting alumni re- in the class of 1908, whose career has and confidence that I have for your Michigan threatened to rally in the
mained in Ann Arbor until today to benoendf onpciucccsnfuur.ideculdhave I hvenforyouor-nthweteysttomnhme,
witness the 84th annual commence- Transferred by the Interstate Com- future. I could have given you or- ninth when they sent two men home,.
ment exercises. inerce commission to our Graduate naments to wear as you go away but but it was short-lived, and Michigan
Sschool, he remained in residence for instead because I trust and admire State went home happy with a victory
SUMMER SESSION three years, acting as assistant to your courage I have tried to give you over the Ann Arborites tucked upc
SUV ER S S I N treyasaciga asitn toa two-edged sword. Unwisely used their sleeve.1
TO OPEN IN W EEK Professor Henry Carter Adams. Short- it may wound its wielder, but with a
ly after his recall to Washington as strong hand and a clear eye it may The Michigan State victory gave1
Registration for the Summer Ses- examiner of the commission he en- serve to overcome some of the prob- the teams an even break as the Wol-
sion in all schools and colleges on tered the service of the American Tel- lems that wil face you.,, - veries took a 10-inning game at
the campus, excluding the Law ephone and Telegraph company, Ferry Field Friday, 7 to 6. Over-
school in which registration took place where he proved himself equal to - anxiety and undue wildness handedf
last week and in which classes begin every task and trust. As its comp- jurist to whom the processes of law the game to Michigan on that occas-l
tomorrow, will be held in the various troller he is now in charge *of one of rad iing force, not an immutable ion after the visitors had touchedI
offices on next Friday and Saturdaythe greatest statistical and account- McAfee for five runs in the seventht
June22 and 23. It has also been an- ing organizations in the world. As "Master of Engineering: Lillian to. tie the score. The game was re-
nounced that the opening days of the a member of the City Planning and Moller Gilbreth, a graduate of the corded as a "moral victory" for State1
-Session, which commences next Mon- Zoning commission of East Orange University of California in the class as the Wolverines were expected to'
day morning, June 25, will also be and president of its Board of Educa- of 1900, author of numerous books run roughshod over the boys fromf
days for registration for the last tion, he has shown himself a public- and papers relating to scientific East Lansing.s
comers. spirited citizen of high ideals. management, member of many learn-
According to Prof. Edward H. "Master of Laws: Arthur Webster, d societies, an acknowledged author
Kraus, dean of the Session, an at- a graduate of the Law school in fn rity wheeters saw ( RESUME PUBLICATION,
tendance at least equalling that of class of 1892, judge of the Circuit found opportunty where others saw fJ E
last year when the total reached over court in Detroit. Widely recognized nne n shaped it t he r with E t m
3,800 is expected. New courses, seve- by his associates of the bar as a pub- unrel e and trent Hner itthi s dionted Summer
ralnotd nn-rsientinsducors le ofical f cnsicuus bilty ndcareer and her attainments confer I Michigan Daily suspends publica- I
ral noted non-resident instductors, lic official of conspicuous ability and distinction on the degree with which tion until Tuesday morning, June i
and special extra-curricular events progressive administrator of the law, the University now invests her. I 26, when regular publication will
have been planned so that the stu- he has courageously advocated the re-b
dents will find the Session worth- form of judicial procedure in the "Doctor of Engineering: Charles begin.
while, it is pointed out. light of modern economic needs. A (Continued on Page 4) ;

oI ourKnowledge of the
Utmiversie, and raise man from physi-
cal insignifi'anee."
Is Vastest Industry
"Education is beyond compasison
the vastest industry in America," he
continued. It concerns us both in
school, and when we are out in the
world. "Colleges are still debating
individual vs. mass education," he em-
phasized to the seniors. "Your prob-
lem is not so much what the Univer-
sity does to you than what you do
to the uinversity. I ou .go into a
woriu where democracy is on th de-
tcnrsive, and it is up to' you to pre-
serve it."
After emphasizing the danger to
den ocracy, he discussed the nw in-
itt<4trial system and the problems that
faced the graduate. "You are to live
through the generation which must
solve the problem of preventing ma-
chinery from becoming a curse, and
efficiency a handicap. Yours is the
generation which must solve the
problem of enpoyment of leisure, not
the problem of getting leisure.
Where Democracy Failed
Dr. Rowell continued by pointing
out that democracy had failed in
meeting the problems of foreign re-
lations, of peace, of race problems.
In concluding, he asked the question,
"can democracy survive its 1wn in-
herent bunk?" "Can we retain the
science and still remain democratic?"
"This does not say that democracy
is a failure," he challenged. "It
challenges you to make it a success!"
"I havedfull faith you will meet it,"
he ended. .
WEEKLY EDITORS
TO CHANGE STYLE
Written for the first time by a staff
of its own, The Michigan Weekly will
be published again next year, it has
been announced by the Board in Con-
trol of Student Publications.
During the past year The Weekly
reprinted important news of the week
from The Daily for the benefit of-
parents of students, enrolled in the
University, and of other outsiders in-
terested in its welfare. However, ;be-
ginining next year the new policy of
having the new Weekly staff white its
own copy especially for outside read-
ers will be effected, acording to plans
approved by the Board in Control of

Student Publications. Accordingly, a
staff of 16 special writers has been
organized.
Other changes in keeping with the
new policy will be made, and it is ex-
pected that The Weekly will be added
permanently to the list of publica-
tions under control of the Board.
Subscriptions may be paid or applied
for at the Press building during the
summer.

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan