100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

July 11, 1928 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1928-07-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

PAGE TWO

THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY

ummrr

fore.

Published every morning except Monday dur-
ing the University Summer Session by the 1
Board in Control of Student Publications.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper andi the local news
published herein.
Entered at the Ann Arbor, Michigan, post-
office as second class matter.
Subscription by carrier, $i.so; by mai, s.5
Offices: Press Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
J. STEWART HOOKER
Editorial Directors.........George . Simons
Martin Mol
City Editor,..............Lawrence R. Klein
Feature Editor.............Eleanor Scribner
Music and Drama Editor.......Stratton Buck
Books Editors..,.........Kenneth G. Patrick
Kathryn Sayer
Telegraph Editor...........Daryl W. Irwin
Night - Editors

Alex Bochnowski
Robert Dockeray
Jack Davis
Tsaiel Charles
Margaret Jahm

[oward Sho
Reporters

Martin Mol
George Simons
Clarence Edelson
ut
Lyle Chubb
Robert O'Brien

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
RAY WACHTER
Adlvetrtising..............,Lawrence Walkley
Advertising ................. Jeannette Dale
Accounts .. ................ Whitney :Manning
Circulation................Bessie V. Egeland
Assistants
Samuel L~ukens Lillian Korvinsky

it is hoped that the benefits of the
Fresh Air camp will be more far-
reach-intg as each year passes, and
that this project will receive many
new supporters as well as those who
have been so gracious with their help
during the past.
THE TRAFFIC PROBLEM
There has long been a need for a
satisfactory traffic system throughout
the United States. It has been a great
problem for both pedestrians and mo-
torists, traveling from one town to
another, to obey the local ordinances
of the city or town in which they
happened to be, and as a result there
are many who have suffered the con-
sequences of breaking laws even
though their intentions were only the
best. Acts regulating the right-of-
way of both pedestrians and automo-
biles differ widely from place to place,
as to laws regarding turns and stop
signals.
One law only seems to be the sub-
ject of enough thought on the part
of municipal administrations to in-
sure its being made known; that is
the speed limit. Signs informing the
1 driver of the local speed limit are
prominent in nearly every town in
the country, but the laws which reg-
ulate traffic in other respects, the
breaking of which cause infinitely
more accidents than the breaking of
the speed limits, are seldom made
known to any save those who reside
in the cities or towns in question.
Even then the effort to inform the
mot-ring citizens of the regulation'
seems to be confined to the justice
courts where those unfortunates who
have unintentionally broken a law are
taken to "tell it to the judge."
The general opinion of the pedes-
trian is that he has as much right
t.o any part of the road as the driver
has, and as a result he is often guilty
of "jay-walking" which in its turn
is responsible for many serious acci-
dents and unlimited confusion. The
laws pertaining to pedestrians differ
as widely as those regulating the driv-
ing of automobiles.
A great step toward the solving of
the problem has been taken by the
Committee on Municipal Traffic Or-
dinances and Regulation of the Na-
tional Conference on Street and High-

T 1/ ASTED 'ROLLS
ROILS WLL
mm THE CAMIIPUS
Deploring the decrease in en-
rollment at the ITniiversity and
despairing the fact that what en-
roliment there is at this grand in-
stitution i snot of the calibre that
should be manifest on the Campus,
we have authorized the Rolls So-
cial Welfare Bureamu, under the
direction of its chief executive and
research leader, Asa Bunghole, to
direct a thorough and searching
investigationI Into the cluracter of
the personnel that infests the
campus at present. We are proud
to state that our representative in
this vast and extensive clean-up
campaign has reported success.
We print below, word for word,
his report:

k

I

^
k

For Good Food
and Quick Service
Eat at the
Arcade Cafeteria/
NICKELS ARCADE
AND
M LUNCH
STATE STREET

WEDNESDAY, JULY 11, 1928
We Carry a Complete and Fresh Supply of
Tennis Equipment Golf Ballsj
1111 SOUTH UNIVERSITY PHONE 4744

For Perfect
Permanent Waving
We use the only perfect method-
Nestle Circuline - because it
adapts itself to the 'individual re-
quirements of each head of hair.
Come in and let us make 3 test
curls on your head, without cost
or -obligation.
Circuline adds life and lustre to
your hair, moulding it into soft,
flowing, natural waves.
Bluebird Hair

1 anet Logie

".fitI IIIIflff I I II I ill I II l ifl iifl fltll f fl l lftllft lfl l tfll lil ll lll t111'
GENUINE
Vid own Canoes"
Used Exclusively in Our Livery
Very Safe and Easy to Paddle
SA U NDE R'SCANOE LIVERYI
On the Huron River at the Foot of Cedar St.
#ll ll lllli llilli t li l llll l r

WEDNESDAY, JULY 11, 1928
Night Editor-A. A. BOCHNOWSKI

THE FRESH AIR CAP
Several large trucks carrying a te
tal of a hundred boys from Detroit
and nearby cities passed through Ann
Arbor yesterday on their way to Pat-
terson lake, the site of the Univer-
sity Fresh A' Camp. These boys will
stay at the camp two weeks and
then will return to their homes to
make way for another contingent of
a hundred boys. In this manner
throughout the summer four hundred
under. privileged boys are afforded two
weeks of wholesome and healthful
recreation.
No doubt there is no more worthy
project sponsored by any student or-
ganization on the campus than that
undertaken by the Student. Christian
association in conducting this camp
for needy boys. It is further en-
couraging to know that the asocia-
tion has received such generous sup-
port from the students, alumni, fac-
ulty and friends of the University in
the annual campaigns for finances to
carry on this beneficial social work.
Leadership at the camp is furnish-
ed by a staff of college men, all of
whom, with one exception, are Mich-
igan students. Although the salaries
of these students are not commensur-
ate with the efforts that are expend-
ed by them in. carrying out the Camp
program each day, their compensation
rests largely in the fact that they have
made a distinctive contribution to the
building of a better boyhood. It is
commendable that the captain of the
varsity football team, George Rich,
should devote a summer as directo
of -an institution whose benefits are
harbored by such a great army of un-
der privileged boys.
To one unfamiliar with camp work,
it Is difficult to imagine the great bevy
of detailed work that must be done
in order to make an ideal set-up when
the first division .of boys arrives. Ever
since the gift of the large camp site
on the lake by the two donors, M.
A. Ives and H. B. Earhart, there has8
been continued effort expended in the
building up of the camp, and this
year for the first time a sufficient
number of cottages have been built
to permit the boys to have ideal sleep-
ing quarters. In this direction Homer
Grafton, business manager of the
camp, has worked untiringly during
the past four years in supervising the
enlargement of camp equipment and
in arranging a camp program that
appeals to the boys.
The Fresh Air camp is an encourag-
ing indication of the type of construc-
tive activity that can actually be ac-
complishel by a student organization.
The fact that such a work will be car-
ried on and that students will de-
vote their summers to act as counsel-
ors to boys whose opportunities andi
privileges in life have been greatly
hampered is indeed gratifying.
To measure precisely th ,benefits
that the boys derive from their; stay at
the camp is indeed a difficult task. It
is known, however, that every boyI
gains weight, the health of practical-
ly everyone is bettered, the boys gain j
a finer concept of honesty in their
sports, they are afforded a' oppor-
tunity of meeting personally -Univer-
sity students who are somewvhat tout--c
standing in their college life, throughI
their counselors they have come toI
know something about life's values 'inf
a way -that they never unde ntoodd be-

way Safety in its adoption of a "mo-
tdel municipal traffic ordinance" de-
signed for adoption by cities through-
out the country. It provides for uni-
form traffic regulations and points
out specifically the obligations of dri-
vers and pedestrians. Under it there
is room f r each city to make what
* exceptions may be necessary due to
unusual circumstances.
Thernunicipalities to which the mo-
del is submitted could do nothing bet-
- than to ordain it in its entirely.
It wouli, in a great measure, solve
one of the most far-reaching prob-
'loos with which governmer.ts have
ever beet: ctfronted, the automobile
traffic problem. The resultant uni-
fication would do much to materially
3 decrease the appalling number of ser-
:ous automobile accidents.
y Campus Opinion
T' the iEditor:
An examination indicites the extent
cf a student's knowledge at a time
whori there is no immediate need for
that kn owledge. A Atudent who care-
fully prepares for an examination and
passes it, does so in view o; the fact
that it is no indication of his ability,
but rather of his store of knowledge
at a particular moment.
It is not the knowledge of a moment
that persists, especially if it is gain-
ed in a short time and has received
little or no application. Much can be
learned in a few weeks; but little will
remain, if a single examination at the
completion of the course be the sole
indication of the student's understand-
Knowledge to remain must be ap-
plied. Students whose actual ability
is to be tested must be subjected to
a much more rigorous thing than an
examination. That is, they must be al-
lowed to apply that which they have
learned.
This, I believe, is the defense of my
university, the Johns Hopkins Medical
School, in adopting the German sys-
tent of instruction. The student now
r'eceives no examinations in that in-
stitution until he has studied there
two years and has finished all his pre-
clinical work. At that time he will
have had for two years the prospect
before him of entering the third year
class and doing actual clinical work
-which is a much greater incentive'
to learn than is the prospect of an
examination in each -course as it it
given; and he will have had ample op-
portunity to absorb the knowledge
which he is about to apply. The time
which he would otherwise have spent
cramming for his exams will have
been used in ways known only to him.
Time will tell if they have been pro-
fitable. I believe that they have.
I f .p.

Ann Arbor Towne
10 July, 1928
Lark,
Editor-in-chief Rolls,
Care of Daily
Dear sir:
Announce to your public that the
trouble has been found. The cause
t has been found, and is. ...Auntie Anti-
Everything, who, representing the
preachers, evangelists, scholarly top-
nuts, and all those of higher and nob-
ler morals, even university presidents,
is trying to keep pure and spotless the
souls and actions of the vast army of
students who, in the belief of the
above-mentioned, should be inhibited
and repressed at every move.
After all, school marms and school
maestros are human. For ten months
they labor in small towns, watched by
snoopers and gossips, and are reported
if they indulge in the most trivial pec-
adillo.
Their spirits scream for freed-
om! The time has come! Rolls
1uust act!
The situation at present is deplor-
able. Relief must be imminent. Sum-
mer school is a haven of recluse for
the harassed school teacher. Where
they can escape their slavery. Summer
school becomes a glorious vacation-
a bacchanalia of eight weeks, during
which the school marms and maestros
find romance and adventure.
What has Michigan to offer? Ath-
letics for all? Bah! Hand ball and
horse shoe tournaments. Tennis courts
at a dollar and a half a crack. Dull
t social affairs. Roquefort Players!
Cupid froze to death long ago. There
isn't even the slightest resemblance of
a spirit of comraderie on the camp-
us.
. Rolls must save the day for the
school marm.
Respectfully submitted,
Asa Bungole, chairman of Rolls Social
Service Bureau.
Such is the state of the camp-
us. But do not despair. Rolls will
print from time to time its own
program of amusement. We will
rescue the tired school teacher
from the depths of boredom. We
will be the salvation of the camp-
us. We will for posterity rank with
(G. D. Eaton, Bennie Oosterbaan,
Sand Bobbie Henderson as Michi-
gan's greatest alumnli.
As a preliminary entertainment
to amuse our public before our
feature program is -prepared, we
have mailed three thousand invita-
tions to a big pep meeting to be
held tonight at the University fire
house. Pint flasks of Bacardi rum
have been sent with the inilta-
tions as favors. You owe it to1
- Michigan to be there. We owe it to
some one else for the favors.
* * *
Never Mind; You Be At The
Pep Meeting Tonight
For Sure
The Daily has it that Elsie Trow-
bridge of the Roquefort Players is an
"accomplished actress." That means
an ascociate in guilt, doesn't it? But
we never thought Bobby Henderson
would admit it.
Sue Burb
HELP. CLEAN UP THE CAMPUS
BY SUPPORTING OUR PROGRAMS!
Certain vacationists have found thatI
fish take vacations just the same as
they do.
* * *
According to the American Motor-
ists' Association, the average upkeep
of an auto is $1 a day. Perhaps they
forgot to figure on oil and gas.
* * *

If Florida ever goes on the rocks
again some of the buildings down there
would make first class gas stations.
It is hard t'o imagine much pleasure
in going over Niagara Falls in a bar-
rel. Perhaps the thrill compensates
for the lack of scenery.

/'J.

rrr, r

C'
tll
fit'
tl
_,

BOOKS! BOOKS! BOOK 1
OVR BARGAIN TABLES.,
Will interest teachers, preachers, librarians and stu-
dents. You will be surprised at what 50c will buy.

I**

I

Shop
Nickels Arcade

P

hone 9616

9 U NIVERSITY
B OOKS TOR E

-"4.

k
K
f '
4
1

WILL BE A HAVEN OF VALUES
-TO ANN ARBOR'S

Merchants' Day.

Shoppers

Collections Include The

Very

Finest

Summertime Apparel

The great Bargain Day Sale is an extraordinary event, indeed, con-
sidering the seasonableness of the apparel offered. It is the great-
est price-slashing event in our history and it promises to eclipse all
former reduction sales in styles, quality and diversity of collections.

Coats
Exceptional values in street, sports and
dressy types. In wide ranges of popular
shades. At these prices these coats are
really most exceptional values. See them,
you'll be interested!
Three Groups

Dresses
The matchless values, the incomparable ar-
ray of styles, the amazing choice of the new-
est materials and colors make this our great-
est dress sale. New up-to-the-minute frocks
for all occasions.
Three Groups

19,.50

29.50

10.00

14.75

39.50

24.75,

SUITS
A splendid showing of exceptionally fine
suits of tweed and twill, hip length jackets
and wrap-around skirts.
14*75

ENSEMBLES
Two Wonderful Groups

19.75

29.75

SWEATERS
Slip-over and Coat
Styles
$1.95

HOSIERY
Every woman will
want at least 2 pairs
$1.19

LINGERIE
Teddies and
Step-ins
$1.39

---

-

CLASSIFIED ADS PAY

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan