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August 10, 1928 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1928-08-10

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PAGE TWO

THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, AUGUST 10, 1928

Published every morning except Monday dur-
ing the University Summer Session by the
Board in Control of Student Publications.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news
published herein,
Entered at the Ann Arbor, Michigan, post-
office as second class matter.
Subscription by carrier, $t.so; by mail, $1.75"
Offices: Press Building, Maynard Street,,
Ann Arbor, Michigan.(
EDITORIAL STAFFj
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITO.R
J. STEWART HOOKER
Editorial Directors,........George E. Simons'
Martin Mol
City Editor...............Lawrence R. Klein
Feature Editor..............Eleanor Scribner
Music and Drama Editor.......Stratton Buck
Books Editors............Kenneth G. Patrick
Kathryn Sayre

tunate that such

an outstanding

preacher as Dr. Straton would be one
to re'sort to such a caustic accusation
as that directed at the Democratic
nominee.
The New York minister's charge is
that Smith "as a public man is the
deadliest foe in Americatoday of the
forces of moral progress and true
political wisdom." Although Governor
Smith's record in the New York As-
sembly and as governor of his state
is one which points to opposition to
the prohibition laws and apparently
one which a great number of our re-
formers and ministers would natur-
ally oppose, there seem to be no just
grounds for the extreme view taken
by Dr. Straton.
Just a's Dr. Straton is prejudiced
against those who by their action in
public office seem to oppose such
measures as prohibition and certain
types of "iblue sky" laws, so Governor
Smith has a right to be prejudiced
against types of reformer's who en-
deavor to cram down the throats of

Alex Bochnow
Robert Docker
Howard Shout
tarae Zahm

Night Editors
ski
ay G
Cli
Reporters

Martin Mol
George Simons
arence Edelson
Robert O'Brien

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Isabel Charles I public officials propaganda intended
to bring about the passage of reform1
Telephone 21214 laws which they picture as panaceas
w for existing evils. It is a matter of
BUSINESS MANAGER viewpoint. Governor Smith has one
RAY WACHTER and has expressed it and hi's whole
Advertising ............... Lawrence akleyfrecord in public life discloses his atti-
Advertising.................Jeannette Dale tude.He is not ashamed of it-in
Accounts...................Whitney Manning
Circulation .. .. .. ......Bessie V. Ege Iantl fact he has on various accasions ade-
Assistants Lillian Korinsky quately defended his record. Because
Janet Logie of his attitude a citizen ha's every
FRIDAY, AUGUST 10, 1928 right to oppose him in his candidacy
for the hgbest office within the gift of
Night Editor-A. A. BOCHNOWSKI I the American people, but for an Amer-
ican preacher to make the sweepingj
assertion that in view of his record
Tshecan betclassedaswthe "deadliest"
foe to moral progress and true polit-
Michigan seems to be all for Hoover - o r e d n n
tk~a fl4O~t~kt d tt dedlA~a una irLSA Cand

OASTED ROLLS
MAKE ITS
A
PAIR
We are sitting here trying to write
a column, but The Fair Co-ed is just
across the room, making goo-goo eyes
at us. She probably wants to take
us for a ride. (As if we wanted to
go!)
One wonders what finally hap-
pened to those brain teams that
Harvard and Yale had conipet.
ing against each other last year.
They seem to have passed from
the picture. Probably the con-
testants died from exhaustion.
The Women's League gave a sports
party last night. We went, but we
couldn't for the life of )us figure
out why they called it a sports party.
Maybe because a fellow would have
to be awfully good sport to consent
to attend one. The besttworkout that
we had was in trying to down some
of the food they served.
Isn't there any one who will
take that Victorian Literature ex.
The naughty teachers in the Kala-
mazoo Public School system have
been forbidden to smoke cigarettes.
That's all right, they can write testi-
monials. "If I were allowed to smoke,
I would choose Chesterfields." Or,
"If only I could smoke, I would be
a Lucky' girl.'
* *
(xene Tunney, late of prize fight
fame and erstwhile Shakespeare
critic, is reported engaged to an
heiress. Well, after that affair
in Chicago a few weeks past, he
probably has decided that heI
should paut something aside for a
rainy day. After all, one must
make a living.
* * *
A Negro on trial in New York City
div'ed headlong through a wall of
the court room to escape. Verily,
"stQne walls do not a prison make
* * *
In California they don't pray
for rain. They pray for wind in
Florida.

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HAMILTON TYPEWRITER
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State and William Sts.

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The Frederic Vita-Tonic
Permanent Wave Is
Now $8.50
Everything in the Line of Beauty Culture
D~one Here

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icai isom -,, eciei y i ai
if such an inference may be made from obviously untrue.
the results of the presidential pref-I Perhaps Dr. Straton could learn a
erence poll conducted by The Summer few things in the field of politics from
Daily. It ha's been the prevalent opin- the chairman of his church board, Su-
ion that this section of the country preme Justice William Harmon Black,
was about three to one for Hoover, who appears to know a little morel
and campus voters upheld that pre- *lbout the governor than does the I
diction. preacher. Justice Black says thatl
There is doubtless much significance Smith is the "cleanest, most loyal man
in the proportions in which the votes in politics today" and "his is easily
were cast for the leading candidates. 1 the most progressive record before
Of the 404 women who voted, 307 the American electorate. On everyc
voted for Hoover, 89 for Smith, and subject he has been far in advancet
8 for Thomas. That is, 75.9 per cent of his party." Perhaps this latter opin-
of the women's votes were for the ion i; 'so an extren, view. Iuite op- ,
Republican candidate. Pehaps there posit, from Dr. Stravi' Y but it is
is merely a majority of Republican one which is apparently more sen'si-)
women on the campus, but it may ble and capable of more substantiation
be attributed to the fact that they than the view of the preacher. {
have observed the work of the ex- At any rate, it seems uncanny that
Commerce Secretary, and compared preachers, in addition to being preach-I
it with certain policies of the New ers, are 'so desirous to inform the
York Governor. populace of some grave danger that9
The vote of the men was 71.8 per is lurking in their very midst. Usually,
cent for Hoover, from which it may however, the danger isn't there, but
perhaps be inferred that certain pol- somehow they =succeed in getting their
icies which are represented by Smith followers all excited. Dr. Straton had
are a bit more popular with men than better confine himself to his pastoral
with women. This showing may also duties. These afford him remarkable
be simply the result of the expres- opportunities for service. If there is
'sion of opinion of a larger group of extreme danger in Al Smith's candi-
voters. dacy the American voters will discov-
The total votes for Norman Thom- er it from sources other than the
as, the candidate of the Socialist par- church pulpit. I1

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200 BOXES ASSORTED AT
25c -the box
WA U9VNIVERSITY
BO O K ST OR E

STATIONERY

SPECIAL!

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lll.1.I,/l/... i/1.1./I~l1tY1w ./~.l./11..t.01.i, JJ.I, °".I :il./~1..I~..Il ce..I./"l~1 ll.Il/w1

.9

M I C H I G A N-The Ideal

Vacation Land

it MEIGAN;

ty, represented only 3.9 per cent of
the votes cast, probably indicating
that the inclination toward radicalism
of a conservative campus is center-
ed in a very small minority of stu-
dents and faculty members, most of
whom are theorists in the narrowest
sense.
A little more than a third of the
faculty vote was for Smith, the rea-
sons for which are probably attribut-
able to party affiliation rather than the
issues of policy. Ballots of the grad-
uate students were 80.9 per cent in
favor of Hoover, which may indicate
that Hoover is the choice of the more
mature portion of the voters. The
percentage of- regular student;8, and
incidentally younger student's, who
favored Smith was slightly greaterI
than in the other groups. This per-
haps is an indication of youthful ap-
proval of certain policies of the gover-
nor, although there is little doubt that
party influence is responsible in a
great many cases.
There is not, however, so much var-
iation in any of the voting ratios that
anything absolutely decisive can be
drawn from any of the figures. The
variation may be attributed to a num-
ber of causes which are interesting
if not positive. There is but one thing
certain, and that is that the campus
is not only a Republican stronghold,
but that regardless of party it is
strongly for Herbert Hoover. Wheth-
er the poll can be taken a's indica-
tive of the proportion in which the
votes will run in the actual election
remains to be seen when the country
goes to the polls in November.
STRATON'S CHARGE
Dr. John Roach Straton's obviously
fallacious charge i1gainst Governor
Alfred E. Smith, uttered from his pul-
pit Suinday, is a type of denunciation
which should have no place in the
church pulpit. It is indeed unfor-

THE MICHIGAN WEEKLY
A summer subscription campaign
foil The Michigan Weekly, the Uni-
versity's youngest publication, is be-
ing launched on the campus today and
tomorrow. In order to reach Summer
Session students who will soon be
leaving Ann Arbor and whose inter-
est in the University will undoubtedly
continue through the year, a booth is
being maintained in Angell hall dur-
ing the day where subscriptions for
The Weekly may be obtained..
With the purpose and new policy
of The Weekly in mind, its import-
ance as a factor in the dissemination'
of University news cannot be over-
estimated. Following its inaugural
year during 1927-28, it was voted very
much worthwhile in that it presented
the news of the campus to outside
readers in unbiased fashion, and its
continuance on a larger scale was
approved by the Board in Control of
Student Publications. An editorial
staff was organized, comprising 14
special writers, and The Weekly will
start the coming year with this staff.
As in the case of eveuky new and
growing publication, The Weekly has
many improvements to be made be-
fore it can be said to be perfectly
fulfilling its mission. But as a fac-
tor in giving tie news of the campus
to outside readers and as a paper
which presages to develop into one
of the most instrumental of Michi-
gan's several publications, The Week-
ly can, and apparently is, doing an
inestimable good. The editors and
the Board of Contziol of Student Pub-
lications, which is sponsoring the
paper, are deserving of the support
which Summer Session students many
of whom will soon return to their
winter localities, and the parents of
regular students, may give them inI
subscribing to The Weekly.

c
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* * *
Some 200 students at the Univer-
sity of Wisconsin have begun train-
ing in the art of field artillery. Prob-
ably planning on a week-end in Chi-
cago.
* * *
Two New York brothers, Al-
fred and Alfonse Hell, received
permission to change their name
to Heill. Now wasn't that a hell
of a thing to do?
Eskimoe indignantly announces to
his public that he, not Hokum, is re-
sponsible for the invention of the new
drink that Swift's drug store is sell-
ing. "I was inspired to the inven-
tion by outside forces over which at
the time I held no control," con-
fessed the youthful inventor today.
We still have no name for the
drink, though suggestions are
pouring into the office continual-
ly.. We shall make the grand an-
nouncement of the prize winner
later.
Remember, the drink consists of
orange ice, vanilla ice cream,
lemon, orange, pineapple, cherry,
ginger ale, and soda water mixed
up a it in a malted milk mixer.
It costs fifteen cents.
We bet that the Republican party,
is all agog over the undertermined ac-!
ceptance of Herbie on Saturday. But
don't wovry, we saw the advance of
his speech. We know what he's going
to say, we know what he's going to
say,!
If you think' that this weather
is hot, forget it. This weather Is
lovely. YOU OUGHT TO BE
HERE DURING AN EXAM
WEEK. THEN YOU'LL EXPERI-
ENCE HOT WEATHER THAT
IS REALLY HOT. IT GETS SO
WARN THAT THE INK EVAP-
ORATES FROM YOUR FOUNT-1
AIN PEN BEFORE IT TOUCHES
THE PAPER.
* * *
Well, boys and girls, be careful.
Whatever you do, don't do what the
young honeymooner in Detroit did
Tuesday when he broke up his happy
home because he remarked that the
doughnut was a "viscious circle."
* * *
And that should keep you backing
up until tomorrow.
LARK.

i

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11

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Thriving in commerce, wealthy in agricultural lands, popular as a summer resort section and noted
for its educational institutions, Southwestern Michigan holds a variety of attractions for the visitor.
A shore-line lapped by Lake Michigan's sparkling waters, and scores of inland lakes nestled amongst
hills and woods, offer the vacationist many havens, reached by rail and boat line and fine roads.
Paved highways lead to busy manufacturing towns and through a bounteous agricultural, grape and
fruit raising section.
As evidence of its commercial activity, one need but mention the leading industries of a few of the
cities of the section .. . Grand Rapids, furniture center of the world; Kalamazoo, home of paper and
stove manufacturing; Muskegon, builder of gas engines; Battle Creek, serving the world its breakfast
cereal; Jackson, producer of automobile accessories; Belding, silk manufacturer.
One of the largest universities in the country is located in peaceful Ann Arbor. Lansing, maker of
automobiles, is the capital city of Michigan. Michigan Normal College, Michigan State College and
many other educational institutions dot the section.
Millions of dollars have been expended to provide a highly efficient communication system, and the
telephone offers the visitor opportunity to keep in touch with home, easily and inexpensively. Long
Distance Rates Are Surprisingly Low!
Note the following Day Station-to-Station rates fog a three-minute conversation, between 4:30
a. m. and 7:00 p. m., to representative points in Southwea Michigan:

From Day
Ann Arbor S" -
to : jzxjt
ADIAN.......................$
ALBION. .........
BATTLE CREEK.........
BENTON HARBOR.............
CHELSEA.......................
COLI)WA: R .................. .
FATON RAPIDS................
GRAND HAVEN................
GRAND) RAPIL)S................
GRASS LAKE...................
IiASTJN(;S.......................
Last of a series of five advertisements
concerning the advantages of Michigan
as the "Ideal Vacation Land."

0. 25
.50
.6o
-95
.x5
.6o
.45
.90
.8o
.20

From Day
Ann Arbor Station-to-Station
to : Rate
HILLSDALE.....................$0.45
HOLLAND......................85
1HOLLY ....................... .35
IONIA...........................65
JACKSON................. ..30
KALAMAZOO...................70
LANSING....................45
itUSKEGON......... ..............95
ST. JOSEPH....................95
SOUTH HAVEN ..................90
YPS*LANTI. .... ..........o
*Rate for five minutes.

Il

You can keep in touch with home and
office by Long Distance Telephone.
Watch for the Blue Bell Sign.

M I C H I G AN--The Ideal Vacation Land
Your Friends Read Our Classified Ads

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