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August 10, 1928 - Image 1

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Michigan Daily, 1928-08-10

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WEATHER
Clear and Warmer.

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MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

VOL. IX. No. 41.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, AUGUST 10, 1928

PRICE FIVE CENTS

PROF W. CARL RUFUS
EXPLAINS NEVI USESP
OF LIGHT IN SCIENCE'
SAYS TRUE SPECTRUM CONSISTS
OF MORE THAN VISIBLE
COLOR SERIES
NEBULAE NOT (AIEOUS
(ives History Of Scientific Research
In Field Placing Importance
On Newton's Work
"We are making great prpgress in
the solving of scientific problems that
have confronted us for many years
by the use of light and light measure-
ments," declared Prof. W. Carl Rufus
of the astronomy department in a lec-
ture 'on "What The Spectrum Re-
veals" delivered at Natural Science
auditorium yesterday afternoon. "By
the new principle that has recently
been set down of the equality of mass
and radial energy we have been able
to explore fields previously closed to
scientific investigation."
For example, the speaker showed
how the velocities of stars are meas-
ured by the use of the spectroscope.
"Turn the spectroscope on a nebula
and it is found to be composed of the
same materials as the earth, air, and
water that we know," he said. Turn
it on the atom, and we see a minia-'
ture solar system with all the parts
revolving in definite relation to each
other."
Tells Of Investigation
"The phenomenon of the rainbow
had not previously been satisfactorily
solved by philosophers and scientists.
Newton, who undoubtedly made some
of the most important experiments in
this field, discovered the diversion as,
well as the difraction of light al-
though the former was they most im-
portant. Investigation was carried on {
continually in this field from that time
on. Wollaston in 1802 developed
Newton's discoveries, and a short
time later a telescope was invented
for use in the study of the spectrum.
Recently the spectroscope has been
discovered.
After showing many slides of as-
tronomical phenomena that have
been examined through the spectro-
scope, Professor Rufus said, in speak-
ing of the common theory of the
gaseous nature of spiral nebulae, "We
believe that spiral nebulae are com-
posed of a large number of stars so
far away that they appear as gas.
These nebulae are very similar to our
own Siberian system which is com-
posed of about 10,000,000 stars and
of which our sun is only a very
small yellow star."
Explains Error
"The true spectrum is not, as has
been erroneously stated, merely a
series of bands of reflected light ob-
tained by passing sunlight through a
prism. That is what is known as
the visible spectrum and forms only
a very small part of the whole. There
are certain electric rays that pass be-
yond the infra-red end of the spec-
trum, and there are the x-rays and
certain other even shouter rays that
are found on the short-wave end."
Professor Rufus also spoke at some
length on the orbits of the electrons
within the hydrogen atom.
VOLCANO CAUSiES
BIG DEATH TOLL

(By Associated Press)
BATAVIA, Java, Aug. 9.-According
to reports transmitted by a resident
of Timoin, nearly the entire island of
Paloeweh, in the ,Dutch East Indies,
has been destroyed by eruption of the
Rokatinda volcano on August 4 and
5. Six villages were destroyed by
fire. The death 'toll was believed
to be nearly a thousand.
Six hundred persons were injured
when hit by fragments thrown out of{
the crater. Further casulaties were
caused by the submersion of the
whole seaboard of the island through
an earthquake accompanying the
eruption. The remainder of the is-
landers, numbering 5,000, were said
to be safe and ample provisions avail-
able.
It was feared that nine native
boats en route from Celenes island to
faloeweh foundered with their crews.

GENERAL NOBILE IS PHOTOGRAPHEDI
WITH HIS RESCUER ON BASE SHIP
Lieut. Elner Lundborg (left). Swed- Kingsbay, Spltzenberg. The picture
ish flyer, and Gen. Umberto Nohile on was taken after General Nobile had
recovered from injuries following his
the deck of the Citta di Milano, base rescure from the Italia camp on the
ship of the Italian expedition at Iice by Lundborg.

WEEKLY TO M 'VARE ISSTRICKEN
RLLLi V \| n|Rn WTHPARALYSIS
SUBSCRIPTION BOOTH
I N LITERARY BUILDING

FROSTIC DISCUSSES
SCHOOL SRUTUE
"Efficient School Buildings" Is Topic
Of Last Lecture Sponsored By
Ctnhnn (1F ~n +nin

JUGQ-SLA VIA U'NEASY
AFTER RADITCH DIES
Shooting Of Croatian Peasant Leader
Causes Deep Anxiety Among
Ail L., ... 1. .

ARRANGEMENTS ARE MADE FOR:
SUMMER STUDENTS WRO
LEAVE SOON
PRICE FOR YEAR IS $1.25
Special Price For Two Publications Is
Announced; Last Opportunity
Until Next Fall
A special booth will be maintained
in Angell hall ' between 9 and 12
o'clock this afternoon for Summer
Session students who wish to sub-I
scribe to The Michigan Weekly, ac-I
cording to Raymond J. Wachter, bus-
iness manager of that ;publication.
Subscriptions may also be taken out
or applied for at the Press building
on Maynard, street anytime during to-
day or tomorrow.
This will be the last opportunity,
until next fall to subscribe to The
Weekly, and arrangements have been
made at this time to accommodate
Summer Session students, many of
whom will be leaving at the end of
next week but who will be interested
in reading the news of the University
during the coming year. The Weekly
is mailed out to all subscribers for the
price of $1.25, which covers the en-
tire 1928-29 school year.
Special Price Made
A special price of $5.50 has also
been made for those who wish to have
both The Weekly and The Daily mail-
ed to them during the coming year,
while local subscribers may take-out
ra subscription for The Daily and a
mail subscription for The Weekly for
$5.00.
The Weekly is, published each week
of the school year and contains all
the important news of the week in
condensed form. During the past
year, its first in existence, the im-
portant news of the week was re-
printed from The :Daily. The suc-
cess it enjoyed, however, warranted
the organization of a special staff of
14 writers who will compose their
own copy for The Weekly during the

Senator-Elect of Pennsylvania and
a power in the politigs of that state,
who is critically ill following a par-
alytic, stroke recently. He is 60 years
old.

HARTLY POINTS AY
TO NEbV BROTHERHOOD
Pastor Of lilxboro Methodist Ch urc

1STORM TAKLS HEAVY
TOLI FRIBL
WEST INDIAN HURRICANE DOES
MIUCH DAMAGE IN RICH
CITRUS SECTION
FLOOD IS NEW THREAT
West Palm Beach, Melbourne, And
Tampa Form Extremities of Area
Swept By Storm
(By Associated Press)
JACKSONVILLE, Fla., Aug. 9.-A
West Indian hurricane, whose care-
less strokes have raked costly fur-
rows across central Florjida for 48
hours, swept toward the gulf today
after stripping part of the rich citrus
belt, unroofing houses by the thou-
sands, and snapping power and com-
munication with monotonous fury.
Coupled with the astonishing news
that no lives had been reported lost
weie fragmentary calculations of
millions in damage from West Palm
Beach to Melbourne on the east coast,
and across almost to Tampa on the
west.
These three points formed extrem-

William S. Vare

i
I
f

schoolu U Eucaton All European Nations
EXPLAINS AIM OF PLANTI TROOPS G U A R D ZAGREB
"The purpose of an educational (By Associated Press)
plant is a means of satisfying social VIENNA, Au.g. 9-Death of Stefan
needs," said Superintendent F. W. Raditch, fiery Croatian Peasant lead-
Frostic, of Wyandotte, in his lecture er, as a result of a shooting in the
"Efficient School Buildings," deliver- chamber of deputies, is causing deep
ed yesterday at University high anxiety in Earone as ,v3l as Jugo-
school. It was the last talk in the Savia.
The belief was held in some quar-
series of conferences for superin- ters today that ti. situation con-
tendents, supervisors, and teachers, tair.ed at least the possibility of civil
offered by the School of Education war for Jugo-Slavia unless strong out-
this summer. side influenceM were efficiently e ert-
The speaker gave as his desire to E'd"
Troops were par iading today through
show to the audience some of the Top eepriigtdi hog
shool the streets of Zagreb, where Raditchl
diffeent general types ofsh died Wednesday night at the age of
buildings and examine them on the 55. Police also appeared in strong
grounds of efficiency and economy. force and all places of entertainment

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In doing this he showed slides of were closed. coming year. It was generally agreedIa
nine different types of two-story There was an uneasy feeling that ,that the news of the week could be in
buildings, with a capacity of 1,100 demonstrations would occur. These, made much more interesting for out-!
pupils, and having an auditorium and it was feared, might lead to greater side readers if written directly for is
gymnasium. disturbances in view of the intense them. is
He used as his main basis of com- resentment of the Croats against the The first issue of the revised Weekly jX
parison the instructional space effi-. Jugo-Slav government party, whom will be published the last week in fu
ciency, which is derived by means they hold responsible for the shooting. September. Subscriptions taken out to
of a formula giving the total area and That such disorders might not long at this time will assure delivery of lit
the instructional area. Superinten- remain local was the fear that was the first issue and remaining copies
dent Frostic believes that this is the causing deep anxiety elsewhere than throughout the year. LE
most important basis of efficiency for Jugo-Slavia. The bitterness of the +pe
a building, as it is the main aim of the Croats toward what they regard as BASEBALL SCORES K
school to instruct, and if the cost of Serbian domination is well known. on
the building is a little more, it is The prospect of a peaceful recon- (By Associated Press) co
made up in the instructional results ciliation seemed hopeless at present, American League th
obtained. especially since a parliamentary com- New York 7, Boston 1. di
Taking up the amount of corridor mission has voted in favor of ratify- Philadelphia 8, Washington 3. al
space necessary for each pupil, or the ing the Nettuno convention with Italy Only games scheduled. m
traffic efficiency, Superintendent in the face of bitter Croatian oppo--
Frostic said that many schools have sition. The Nettuno convention per- National League of
much waste space because the cor- mits Italians to own land along the Pittsburgh 5, St. Louis 4. an
ridors are wider, than is, necessary. Dalmatian coastal line. Only gamem scheduled. in
He stated that the idea that each
pupil needs fifteen square' feet of NEW FOG-PIERCINGCAMERA FOR USE
space is being seriously questioned,
due to various experiments that are MAY CH ANGE WAR TACTICS IN
being made on a large scale.l
In the course of his lecture the "The new fog-piercing camera in- planned In anticipation of just such "c
speaker took up the idea of waste vented for use in the army by Capt. weather. Now, with the new fog- yo
spacedueto"proper placing of td spiercing camera invented by Capt. er
furniture, the disregard for the size Albert W. Stevens may revolutionize Stevens in vogue, enemy troops are w
and grade of pupils, and space wasted wartime tactics in many respects," no longer assured of this protection. ha
by an attempt of architects to sell declared Major Isaac Spalding, of the "Another thing to consider," Major 2,C
plans for buildings that are pleasing United States Army, in an interview Spalding stated, "is the fact that le
to look at. yesterday. "It will prlobably result troops often moved about under the th
in changing the whole general pro- cover of darkness. Then, when it an
ECcedure of maneuvering troops, espe- was found that flares from enemy air- th
NE R SS IS I " ia.,;,-F,_ .+- lna i lrn thoi innntin thiC1h

Of Tolstoy Club
Gives Lecture Under Ausbices
ELLOGG PLAN DISCUSSED
"Attempts at the practical estab-
shment of brotherhod have always
ailed because of a disregard of the
act that in order to betrue brother-
ood it must be universal and all-
nclasive," averred Rev. Frank Hart-
y, pastor of the Dixboro Methodist
hurch and war veteran, in his lec-1
ure yesterday afternoon in Angell
all on "Can We Believe in Broth-
rhood?"f
"We can have faith in brotherhood
s an ideal only - if we see it as in-,
uding 'all our fellows," the speak-
r continued. "It is when it is merely
artial and hypocritical that it fails."
e pointed to the status of India and
gypt among the supposedly equal
ommonwealths of Great Britain as
n example of the incomplete work-
g-out of brotherhood.
"The unit upon which our society
built is the family," he said. "What.
needed is an extension of the fam-
y ideal-recognition of difference of
unction coupled with fullest mutual
leration and affection-to the larger
fe of the race."
At the close of the lecture the
eague of Nations and the Kellogg
eace plan were discussed. Under the
ellogg multi-lateral treaty plan, if
ne nation breaks its word the others
onsider themselves released. Under
le League, however, according to the
scussion, machinery is provided to
low hot blood to cool before com-
ishion of any overt act.
The lecture was under the auspicesf
the Tolstoy centenary committee,
nd was in correlation with an exhibit
the lobby of the Library.
OF ARMY
MANY RESPECTS
oncerns the difference between the
ounger men of 21 to 30 and the old- I
men of 30 to 45 in keeping up
ith cuirent events. During the first
alf of the training period, about
000 men were situated at Fort Og-o
thorpe and actual figures showed
at about 2,000 copies of the Chat-
nooga morning paper were read in
e camp.- Then, with the start of
-n 3 n tA 2 f n8- h f iii. v nyin

Devastation Reported
Out of the twenty-three cities and
towns in the zone of winds, ranging
from 40 to 110 miles' an hour in velo-
city, came fitful dribblings of infor-
mation that gave almost identical ac-
counts of devastation. This held true
for all except the Lake Okeechhobee
district, where flood water were
threatening crops and small commun-
ities as tributaries rose under the
impetus of 18 inches of rainfall in 24
hours. The lake had rigen two feet,
Heading inland at the Palm
Beaches on Tuesday, where minor
damage occurred, the storm struck
at JupiteN, unrooting houses and
snapping power lines on every hand.
Mftclh of the east coast spent Tues-
day and Wednesday night in darkness
to be joined in this plight Wednes-
day night by towns of the central
area.
Orchards Stripped
Next the disturbance dug into the
sparsely-settled east central lake
country where St. Cloud was men-
aced for a .time by East Lake Ta-
hopekaliga. By late afternoon Wed-
nesday the hillocks and small cities
of the central citrus belt began to
feel the shrieking gale.
Already the coast citrus area in
spots resembled a winter scene, with
orchards stripped of leaves and green
fruit. Myriad snowballs of young
orlanges, representing fortunes, litter-
ed the ground beneath the bare trees.
In the central belt, meager reports
of damag4 indicated that the same
conditions obtained as the storm
passed in the night, and communica-
tion and power lines began snapping
as fast as they could be repaired.
Several towns and cities of the
central belt were cut off in the midst
of their efforts to give the outside
wolxd an idea of what was going on,
Winter Haven was reporting that
afternoon gales were approaching a
75-mile velocity when the line sput-
tered out.
HOOVER TO SPEAK
ON RETURN TRIP
(By Associated Press)
STANFORD UNIVERSITY, Califor-
nia, August 9-More changes in, and
addition's to Herbert Hoover's itiner-
ary on a return trip to Washington
were announced tentatively today with
rear-platform speeches scheduled at
Albuquerque, New Mexico, Hutchin-
son and Topeka, Kansas, and other
places.
The special train of the Republican
Presidential Candidate will leave here
one week from tonight for Santa Bar-
bara where a stop will be made early
the next day so the nominee can at-
tend a celebration there.

ities of a storm-torn square, the other
sides of which remained to be deter-
mined by the westward course of the
storm, which apparently was dimin-
ishing in intensity. Storgms warnings
were raised as far west as Mobile, in-
dicating that the disturbance was
bound for the Apalachicola curve of
the gulf coast line.

SEENIN CHINAI
(By Associated Press)

TOKIO, Aug. 9.-Indications are
seen at a new crisis in China.
Japan has sent formal warnings to
both governments against acts re-
garded as inimical to Japan's inter-
ests.
A note was sent the Nanking gov-
ernment stating that unless the Na-
tionalists change their attitude to-
ward Japan's interests in China,
"the Japanese government may be
obliged to take such measures as it
deems suitable for safeguarding
rights and interests assured by the

1
}
J
i

cially during foggy weather. planesa iscioseadU Lnei ica"0 LIS s the second halt of the training period,
Major Spalding, who has been sent often had to be abandoned to wait the older men joined the camp, num-
to summer school here by the War for foggy weather; With the fog- bering about 4,000, and the circulation
Department at Washington, became piercing camera now a reality, the of the newspaper; dropped to 1,000
acquainted with Capt. Stevens, the only real way to protect marching of the newspaper dropped to 1,000,
inventor of the new camera, when at troops from above is to keep enemy showing a lack of interest on their
Fort Bragg, N. C., several years ago, airplanes from flying above them." part to keep up with the current
while the latter was doing photo-1 Major Spalding, who was an in- events."
graphic work for the field artillery. structor at Fort Oglethorpe near Major Spalding is enrolled in sum-
"At that time he was considered one Chattanooga, Tenn., during the first mer school here as a result of the
of the ablest men in air photography year after America entered the Worldp
and an expert in the service," Major War, and later an instructor on the policy of the War Department to give
Spalding said. field artillery division at Fort Sill, its officers an education which will
"In France during the World War," Oklahoma, declared that it has been help. them professionally in the per-
Major Spalding continued, "troops his personal observation that school formance of their duties. He said he
were often marched to their destina- teachers and young lawyers made the chose Michigan in perference to sev-
tion under the cover of a fog, since best officers training material durIng eral eastern and mid-western univer-
they could move unseen. As a matter the war. "Another thing that may sities and that he has thoroughly
of 't .+ .-.. An - nte'n seem strange." Maor Snalding said. enjoyed his summer here.

Oi iact, sucia maneuvers welle oiLeu f --- FJ YL W,.EV 1--J-. r L'-.w

....b ,.....,. .. .. - . _ _

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