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August 08, 1928 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1928-08-08

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PAGE TWO

THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 8, 1928

. .

Published every morning except Monday dur.
ing the University Summer Session by the
Hoard in Control of Student Publications.
The Associated Press is, exclusively en-
tided to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news
published herein.
Entered at the Ann Arbor, Michigan, post-
office as second class matter.
Subscription by carrier= $.so; by mail, $1.7S.
OfficeA Press Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4996
MANAGING EDITOR
J. STEWART HOOKER
Editorial Directors........George E. Simons
Martin Mol
City Editor............Lawrence R. Klein
Fatur9 Editor..............Eleanor Scribner
Masic and Drama Editor.......Stratton Buck
Books Editors..........Kenneth G. Patrick
Kathryn Sayre

__

Alx Bochuow~
Robert Docket
Howard Shout
Margaret Zahn
Isabel Charles

Night Editors
'ski
ray
Cla
Reporters

Martin Mol
George Simons
arence Edelson
Robert O'Brien

m

R

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 2114
BUSINESS MANAGER
RAY WACHTER]
Advertising.............. Lawrence Walkley
Advertising................Jeannette Dale]
Accounts...................Whitney Manning1
Circulation.................Bessie V. Egelane
Assistants]
Samuel Lukens Lillian Korvinsky
Janet Logiec
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 8, 1928 t
Night Editor-HOWARD SHOUT
TODAY'S BALLOTi
Students and members of the faculty
of the University will have an oppor-
tunity today to express their prefer-t
ences for the next president of thet
United States. Of course there can
be nothing decisive in the results from
the point of view of actually electing
the nation's next chief executive, but
It will at least indicate the general
trend of opinion on the campus. r
Perhaps the voters today will riot
experience a igreat deal of satisfaction
because of the fact that their votes
will not count in the actual determin-
ation of a president, and for that rea-
son it perhaps should not be consid-
ered an opportunity fr m the sund-
point of the individual. It is an op-1
potunity, however, to allow thoset
who are sincerely interested in poli-
ties to learn something of the opin-
ions, held by a selected. group of in-
telligent individuals such as the facul-
ty and student body of a great uni-
versity. Unless a very great percen-
tage of those on the campus this
summer cast a ballot the results can
h othing but unreliable. The more
votes that are cast, the more signifi-
cant does the result become.
It is often said, and it apparently
is based upon a partial truth, that
educated people who are best quali-
fled to expres's an opinion on matters
pertaining to the welfare of the na-
tion are uninterested and neglectful.
It seems to b the popular belief that
politics are so rotten than an hon-
est vote does not count. Certainly
honest votes will not count when they
are not cast, nor will the desires of
intelligent voters be fulfilled until
more of them take time to be good
citizens. This will be a chance to
begin expressing educated opinions.
Who will occupy the White House
for the next four years is a matter
of vital interest to all of us, and a
display of genuine opinion on this
matter will be somewhat of a contra-
diction of the idea that students have
no serious iterests. This idea is so
often expressed than an opportunity
to correct it should be considered a
privilege. To those students who are,
during the regular session, occupied
in some profession this will be an op-
portunity (to express an opinion
moulded by education and actual ex-
perience.
The women's vote will be strong to-
day, and should be a ;good indication
of the general opinion of women
which is really a strong factor in the
determination of national questions
since their enfranchisement.
Today's balloting will not only be
indicative of the party preference
of the majority of the student body,
but will show the opinion of intel-
ligent people in regard to the policies
which each candidate supposedly up-
holds. In fact, many votes will prob-
ably be determined by that rather than
by partisanship alone, and that is a
great factor in intelligent voting.
Individual opinion is of conse nec-
cessary to form mass opinions and it

is only in the event that a large por-
tion of the student body responds that
the ballot will become representative
enough to fulfill its purpose, that of
determining the general attitude of
a selected- group of people. For that

reason every student and faculty mem-
ber should make it a point to ex-
press his or her opinion before the
polls close.
COLLEGE STARS IN THE OLMPICS
How have college-trained athletes
fared in the Olympics? That is a
question that is often asked and it
has been answered in part by a set
of statistics compiled by James Tay-
lor, Columbus '05, which include the
results of the eight meets previous
to the one going on at the present
time.
The highest 'point-scorer of all is
Ray, Ewry of Purdue university who
won nearly all of the jumping events
at the Paris, St. Louis, Athens, and
London Olympic games from 1900 to
1908 inclusive. The second high in-
dividual scorer was Ralph Rose of
Michigan who earned 27 points for
his country during his Olympic com-
petition.
Of the 1,2122 2-3 points scored by
the United States in these eight
games, 894 2-3 points were scored by
college-trained men, while 11 1-4
were scored by preparatory school.
athletes. So far this year college
athletes have taken a good share of
Points too.$
These facts may indicate the su-
periority of college training, or they
may simply mean only that the col-
lege athlete has more time which he
can devote to training and benefits
only ?nsofarasrlength of training
periods is concerned. The later is
very improbable however, if taken
alone. Several things must be con-
sidered in order to arrive at a log-'
ical conclusion. First, college ath-
letes have the benefit of experts to
instruct them in the finer points of
athletic events. They are trained to
take the proper care of themselves,
to eat only the food that is best for
them, and to obtain the proper
amount of exercise and rest. They,
are also taught to be mentally alert
at all times.
Michigan has been represented in
many Olympic events and has made
a very creditable showing in the total
number of points amassed during
competition, and her coaches and!
trainers, along with many other
prominent athletic directors in the
country are to be commended on the
type of training they have offered.
It is through their efforts and advice
that college athletes have seemingly
become the mainstay of American
Olympic teams.
NO OIL
The City Council of Ann Arbor is
to be congratulated on its stand in
refusing to permit the erection of
an oil station on the property locted
on the corner of Washtenaw and
South University avenues. This re-
fusal came about through the coun-
cil's action In changing the zone rat-
ing of this property, taking it from
class C, which is business, and trans-
ferring it to Class B, which is resi-
dential.
After a controversy that extended
over a period of several months final
action on the question 'has been taken
and the action definitely prohibits
the use of the property in question
for any purpose other than residen-
tial.
Washtenaw avenue is one of Ann
Arbor's residential lanes. The fra-
ternity and sorority houses located on
that avenue, together with the many
beautiful private homes, make for
a thoroughfare that is deserving of
protection against the intrusion of
commercially-minded promoters eag-

er to convert property into commer-
cial enterprise in order that they
may benefit from monetary gain. The
protection in this particular sitation
was renderedbyhthe council in its
decision last night.
The erection of an oil filling sta-
tion at this corner would have been
an eyesore to the beauty of the
residential surroundings of this prop-
erty. The principal feature of the
zoning ordinance of the city is to
group together as 'far as is possible
business houses in one locality or
along one particular thoroughfare,
residences in other localities, and so
on. This plan obviously makes for
security in buying property, for the
prospective buyer can know before-
hand in what zone the porperty he is
contemplating buying. lies. In the
case being discussed, the purchasers
of the Washtenaw property claimed
that they are unjustly treated in view
of the fact that at the time of the pur-
chase the property was in a zone
which permitted them to make com-
mercial use of it. In answer to this,
however, it is revealed that the prop-
erty was sold on condition that no
oil filling station was to be erected,
and it is commendable that the iCty
Council took congizance of this agree-
ment in making its decision last
night.

OASTED RQLL
Thomas
Thonas
THOMAS
Rolls' own, Norman Thomas, be-
cause of cruel and corrupt politics,
has had his name omitted from the
ballot in The Daily presidential poll
today. Undaunted; however, we shall
continue to press our campaign for
the Socialist candidate.
* * *
Vote For Thomas!
In order to instruct its huge
following of supporters, the Rolls
election committee will print
below sample ballots. On your
ballots this morning you will see
two names, Herbert Hoover and
Albert Smith. Disregard these
two, and write in the blank space
that is remaining the name of the-
country's finest and nobles man,
Norman Thomas. The blank will
appear like this:
II
Vote For Thomas!
We trust that every loyal and true
American citizen will today vote the
Rolls ticket and place in office the

ii

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Checks or Letters of Credit guaran-
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Cashed promptly at home and
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* * *
Vote For Thomas!
We feel that the entire campus
will be behind us today. The engi-
neers will, because they are the
laboring class. The S. C. A. will,
because Thomas is a minister.
* * *
Vote For Thomas!
A Rolls candidate has never lost
Daily election. We believe with

I

101 N. Main

707 N. Unv.

i

a

old Boss Tweed that "We don't care
who does the voting as long as weS
do the counting." Vote for our man
and you can't lose.
Vote For Thomas!
We will pay any price to nsure
the fact that there will be no cor-
rnption' in toddy's election.
Vote For Thomas!
"If elected," said our, candidate in
an exclusive interview yesterday,
"I will favor student-owned automo-
biles, shorter hours and more credit,
and unlimited class cuts."
Students and faculty, we appeal to
you! You can't afford to let a man
like that be defeated. He is not only
going to help the student but raise
faculty salaries as well.
"I shall," said Dr. Thomas, "raise'
the teaching profession to the level
of the working man."
* * * F
Vote For Thomas!
"My country owes me nothing,
stated the doctor: "in fact I owe
it nothing, and that is more than
the Republican party can say!"
* * *
We leave you with one last appeal
in regard to the election: You can't
go wrong by voting, for Norman
Thomas, for The Nation is behind
him.
Vote For Thomas!
Today Is The Day
Today is the day for the Daily Poll,
When all the students vote;
Watch, as our ballots inward roll-
On socialists we dote.
Vote ye all for Thomas, great,
He's the man of the Nation's ehoice.
And not only that but also, besides,
He echos the people's voice..
Let's all get on the wagon band
And tear about the county
Shouting out on every hand
THOMAS, THOMAS, THOMAS.
* *
Vote For Thomas!
LA"K.

TRAIN FOR
BUSINESS
Fall Term
Sept. 4 & 17
Hamilton
Business College,
State & William Sts. Ann Arbor

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