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August 08, 1928 - Image 1

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1928-08-08

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MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

VOL. IX. No. 39 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 8, 1928. PRICE FIVE CENTS
r

AMERICAN SWIM TEAM
0DISPLAYS PROI SING
FORM IN PRELIMiNARY

SAMPLE BALLOT
Daily Presidential Poll
Wednesday, August 8, 1928.
(1) Presidential Preference-

ROJAC AND LAUFER
METER EVENT IN
RECORD

WIN
NEW

100

()
( )
( )

Herbert Hoover
Alfred E. Smith

WATER POLO TEAM READY1
Slankenburg Elminated In Semi
Final of 200 Meter Breaststroke,
But All Others In
(By Associated Press)
AMSTERDAM, August 7.-Men and
women swimmers from the United
States today made a much better
showing than their comrades in the
track and field division could boast
at this stage of the big athletic car-
nival last week.
Thomas Blankerburg, Oakland,
California, was eliminated in the
semi-final of the 200 meter brest-
stroke but all the other Americans
advanced. As a result of Blankel-
burg'sdefeat the United States will
not be represented in the finals of the
200 meter breaststroke.
George Kogac of New York, Walter
Laufer of Chicago, and Paul Wyatt
of Uniontown, Pennsylvania, won
their heat in the 100 meter breast-
stroke. Kogac set the new
world's record of 1 minute 9 4-5 sec-
onds.
Crabbe And Clapp Win,
Clareace Crabbe, Honolulu, and
Austin Clapp of Hollywood, flashed
magnificient performances in their
respective heats of the 400 meter free
style event, winning handily, Clapp
by, a spectacular spring against the
Japanese, Arai, while Crabbe was
within 1-5 of a second of the best
time of the day made by Arne Borg.
Crabbe's time was 5 minutes 9 4-5
seconds.
Raymopd Ruddy, young New York
star, finished second to Borg's sen-
sational 5 minutes 9 3-5 seconds. The
youngster was overcome by the
Swede's appalling speed but never
lost hear.t and finished more than 5
meters ahead Hans Schaumacher of
Germany.
Hungary and Germany are finalists
in the water polo competition but
while the victor will be crowned
Olympic champion, the looser will
not be placed second as the defeated
finalist must play France or Great
Britain for second place according
to the complicated rules governing
Olympic waterpolo competition.
California Crew Takes Event
The United States team tomorrow
will begin a round of play for third
place, playing Malta first. The+
United States team is conceded an
excellent chance to finish third.
California's eight oar crew made
another impressive showing today inj
the Olympic rowing regetta, beating
the picturesque Italian outfit by four
lengths, while Clem Myers Philadel-
phia single sculler, also rang up a1
victory for Uncle Sam, defeating San-
dau of Switzerland, by winning both+
entries of semi-final rounds in their
respective classes.
The eight from Italy turned out to
be a little easier proposition than theI
Americans had expected. Fitting.
forty-eight to fifty strokes to the min-+
ute and maintaining it for the full
distance, the Italians rowed the hard-
est stroke of any entry but against+
the powerful pulling of KI Ebright'sl
men their short sharp strokes proved
unavailing.
DOCTOR HARTLEY
TO GIVE LECTURE
"Can We Believe in Brotherhood?"
is the title of a lecture to be given
at 4:15 o'clock tomorrow in room 231

Angell hall by Rev. Frank Hartley,
pastor of the Dixboro Methodist
church and veteran of the British ar-
my. The lecture is one of a series
given in commemoration of the cen-
tenary of Tolstoy, the great Russian
novelist and humanitarian.
The discussion tomorrow is expect-
ed to include consideration of the
League of Nations as a practical
method of attaining brotherhood.

(2 cation

(
(
(
(

)
)
)
)

Faculty
Graduate Student
Regular Student
Male.
Female

Signature...'....' ...........................

EDUCTION CLUMBS
HERBOYNTON TALKI
Chief Objective Is To Insure Each
Individual Opportunity To
His Limit
EDMONSON TOASTMASTER
"The chief objective of American
education is to insure to each indi-
vidual 'his opportunity of making the
most of himself up to the limit of his
capacity," said Frank D. Boynton,,
superintendent, of schools at Ithaca,
New York, in his address "What's
Wrong with American Education,"
delivered before 200 members and
guests of the Men's and Women's
Educational clubs at their annual
Summer Session banquet held at the
Union last night.
Toastmaster James B. Edmondson,
of the School of Education, introduced
the speaker as a "man with Western
ideals and an Eastern atmosphere."
superintendent Byton hs held his
position at Ithaca twenty-nine years,
is president of the department of
superintendence of the National Edu-
cation Association, and i know
throughout the United States for his
Vig; ios suppo v Ge the high school
against the attacks of New York col-
;ege authorities.
Education Points To Truth
Superintendent Boynton opened his
talk with the statement that "educa-
tion offers the only avenue for the
advancement of civilization, through
the discovery of new truths." In de-
fending the high school he said,
"College professors have surveyed us,
motivated us, standardized us, corel-
lated us, jeopardized us, and then
quarrelled with the result."
"It is our educational system that
has kept the United States American.
One-third of our population was born
in Europe or Asia or are the children
of such parents. In spite of state-
ments to the contrary the public
school today is Christian. You
teachers should not apologize for
your profession. You have a great
opportunity."
The European criticism that we
have accomplished nothing was vig-
orously attacked by Superintendent
Boynton. "They say we lack culture.
Perhaps we do. But since our foun-
dation we have hewed out of a forest
inhabited by wild beasts and wlder
men an area large enough to feed the
combined population of England, Hol-
land, Belgium, Denmark, and France,
and our people are today in better
economic condition than in those
countries. We have an educational
system that has taken the wooden
shoes off our peasants, if I may call
them that, and put them in the best
living conditions of any country."
"If we shad squeezed Henry Ford's
education into four water-tight com-
partments, he would have come out
an engineer, but the world would have
gone afoot, instead of riding in au-
tomobiles," said the speaker after
lauding the proposed University Col-
lege, saying it would do more to de-
velop genius ,
"Civilization, the struggle of man
up from savagery, is marked by white
collar jobs," concluded Superintend-
ent Boynton, as he showed the value
of brains.

SCHOOL ORCHEISTRA,
Hamtramck High School Orchestra
Will Give Last Concert Of Summer
At Hill Auditorium
STACEY HIOLMES DIRECTS
Summer Session students and citi-
zens of Ann Arbor who are interested
in recent progress i4 public school
music are cordially invited to a com-
plimentary concert to be given at 8
o'clock tonight in Hill auditfqipn by
the Hamtramcl high school orcheptra'
under the direction of Mtacey felHes.
This organization is $f the rost ad-
vanced type, according to pean 1ld-
ward H. Kraus and President 0, 4.
Sink of the School of Music, who are
joint sponsors of the concert, and its
program embodies the very latest in
music education.
Tonight's program w*ill be:.
Overture, "Ungarische Listspiel"
Keler-Bela
Children's Suite from "Kinderscenen"
Schumann
Children's Suite from "Kinderscenen"

SEVEN MICHIGAN MEN
AMONG TIEN APPOINTED
TO RHETORICACULTY
KNNETH HOAG, WHO TAUGHT
TWO YEARS AGO, WILL
RETURN
TWO WiLL BE ASSISTANTS
Many Will Work For Higher Degreess
While Teaching Here, it Is
A nnouned
Appointment of ten new members
of the rhetoric department, announc-
ed yesterday afternoon by the office
of the department to take effect this
fall, is marked by a preponderance ofI
Michigan graduates among the ap-
pointees. Seven of the ten new mem-
bers of the staff did their undergrad-
uate work here, and many are back
to teach part time while working for
higher degrees.
M. A. Butchart, '26, who won the
'senior medal in rhetoric two years ago
and has been teaching since at the
University of Pittsburg, will return to
teach both freshman and sophomore
rhetoric. John S. Diekhoff, '27, who
specialized here in rhetoric and phil-
osophy and has since studied in Eng-
land and Germany, is also returning,
as is Theodore Hornberger, '27, who
ha's been studying for the English
teachers' certificate at the University'
of London during the past year.
Newell Bebout, '26L, will leave his'
position at the University of Kansas 1
to come here and teach while work-
ing for his doctor's degree, while Ken-
neth foag, '24, who taught here twd
years ago, is coming back again, leav'-
ing his post at the University of Mis-
souri
Kenneth Thorpe Rowe, a graduate
of Harvard, is coming here from the
University of Oregon as an assistant
professor. Howard Baker will leave
his associate professorship at Albion
to teach sophomore work he.e. while
J. S. Turner, now an instructor at
Oberlin, will teach part time while:
working for his docto's degreh
Harold Ott, '28, and Benjamin De-
Graff, '28, are returning next year
as assistants in the department.
BERRY DI S C U SSES
ABNORMAL C A S E S
IN SECOND TALKI
Supdrintendents and teachers were
further instructed, in the care of han-
dicapped children in the school yes-
terday afternoon when Dr. . S. Berry
gave his lecture "Service Clinics" at'
the University High School,
Shaping his talk ,to aid especially
the aller community, which has not
had e opportunity of learning to1
care for special cases, Dr. Berry list-
ed many different types of clinics, told
various ways in which they might be
e'stablished, and what they would ac-
complish toward the betterment of
education in Michigan,
The main suggestion of Dr. Berry
was a traveling clinic, to be under the
supervision of the state 'department
of education. This mobile clinic ist
to be equipped with experts in psy-
choanalysi's, and also health experts,
and would examine the special casesc

in the smaller communities where
they have not the expert aid. Under
Dr. Berry's plan the more serioust
cases would be referred to experts atf
the University and would be given
such treatment as is possible. He
pointed out that provision has been
made to give free treatment to those
whose parents are unable to pay.
Dr. Berry emphasized the idea that
all pupils should have this prelimin-1
ary examination before being sent to
the expe"'s at the University, saying
that many cares can be cared for at
home by rh.? local physicians or school
authorities. Hs said his idea was that
that trav - -g clinic should go first
only to those smaller communities
that are the least ablb to help them-
selves, and 'should not go to the cities.
which already have their own organ-
izations for the care of handicapped
children.}

PRESUIDENTIAL PRIFIINCE POLL
WILL BE HELD ON CAMPUS TODAY
UNDER DICTIONOF THE DILY
Large Vote Anticipated As Interest In
Leading Candidates Appears
To Be At High Pitch
BOOTHS LOCATED AT THREE PLACES
Voting booths will be opened promptly at 9 o'clock this morning
for the experimental poll on the Presidential candidates which will
be conducted during the day under the auspices of The Summer
Daily. The polls will be open all day until 5 o'clock with the excep-
tion of a half an hour between 12:15 and 12:45 o'clock tiis noon.
With interest at high pitch this summer, a large vote is anticipated.
Three boths, located on the diagonal in front of the Main
Library, by the engineering arch at one end ofthe diagonal, and in
front of Angell Hall will be open -
R ARTHAGUENEY to take care of the campus vote. A
member of The Daily staff will be in
charge of each table. where ballots
LECTURESOT A LITTLE SUPPORTS POLL
-- - "Straw votes often help to
Describes Conditions' That Existed shape plitical results," Presi-
In Austria immediately After dent Clarence Cook Little said
World War yesterday in commenting on
the Presidential poll being con-
BRUCE LECTURES TODAY ducted by The Summer Daily I
today. "The present election is
"Austria's revolution has been very full of interesting contrasts and
different from that in Russia," de- ideals, training, abilities and
clared Dr. Martha Guernsey, of the f personalities of the candidates.
psychology department in her lecture ( The effort of The Daily to poll
on "The Social Revolution in Austria" the opinion of the Summer stu-
delivered In Natural Science auditor-1 dents is commendable and the
lum yesterday afternoon. Iresults should be indicative of
"Tile ouly political phase in the a cross section of opinion in
Austrian revolution was the expulsion much of this part of the coun-
of the Hapsburgs. The socialist re-try"
gime which exists at the present time may be obtained, marked and deposited
in the country is also very different in the ballot boxes.
from Russian socialism. In Austria Three Checks Required
monarchists and communists are It is necessary to make but three
equally unpopular. No communist stu- msrks on each ballot and then place
dents or members of the faculty are (,ne signature at the bottom of the
alowed in the universities," ballot, the whole proceedure, thereby,
"The social reforms which were nec- takuig but a very short time. Under
essary with the establishmnent of a th first division on the ballot,l a
new government after the revolutbn ample of which appears on this page,
included the providing of food for the voter will indcate his choice of
starving, the giving of employment to Herbert hoover or Alfred Smith, or;
thle unemployed, and the providing oIin the blank line, an alternative
hes for refugye,".he potidng choice if he wishes to vote for some
Dhsase awas prevalent atnthetim other candidate. In the second di-
as 80 % of children were suffering with vision the classification, first, of
as$Qofcilrn er ufein itfaculty,gruaesuntorglr
rickets, and 58 per cent of the adults graduate student or reguar
with tuberculosis. The new regime student, should be indicated; and sec-
ond, whether the voter is male or fe-
immediately plunged into the work o male.
bettering this condition." Iti en requested that the voter
"In her solution of her social prob- sign his orher signature at the hot-
lems," Doctor Guernsey said "Aus-sgnhsrhrsgateattebt
' D s tom of the ballot. This is necessary
tria adopted the eight hour day, the; only for the purpose of preventing

I

SchumannI

a. Soldiers' March
b. A Curious Story.
e, The Merry Farmer
d . Traunerei
e, Kittle Romance
f, Little Romanwe .
f, Hunting song
Gavotte and Musette $c2
Three Old English songs fqr trumpet
Grouland Suite Jnel-Frederiksen
Serenade (duet for horn and flte)
Till
March of the Priests (from "Athalle")
Mendelssohn
DRAMA CLASSES
TO SHOW "MINICH"
Play Production classes under the
direction of Earl Fleishman of the
Speech department will present "Min-
ich" at 8:15 o'clock next Monday at
Sarah Caswell Angell hall,
"Minich" was written by Edna. Fer-1
ber and George Kaufman in collabora-
tion, and the "Royal Family" which'
they also wrote together is on Broad-
way now. Edna Ferber is also the
writer of the novel "Show Boat" which
has been produced as a musical com-
edy. "Merton of the Movies" was
written for the stage by Kaufman in
collaboration with Connelly.
"Minich" has been chosen by Play
Production to show those interested
what the labratory class in Play Pro-
duction has been doing during the
Summer Session,
As royalties and other properties
have to bo provided for, an admission
of 50 cent's will be charged.
SPECIAL EXHIBIT
SHOWN IN LIBRARY
The League of Nations Non-Parti-
san association wil have an exhibit
of educational materipl in the main
lobby of the Library starting this mor-
ning and running through Thursday.
It includes maps, factual material,
and literature, which is of especial
interest to teachers in their work.
President C. C. Little is the state
chairman of the association.

prohibitiOn of child labor, and an in-
surance system for her laborers. The,
separation of church and state, the.
fostering of art, the opera, and the
theater were also parts of the new
program,t
Dr. James D. Bruce will lecture on
"The Value of the Periodic Medical
Examination" at 5 o'clock. this after-
noon in Natural Science auditorium.
DESMOND LEAVES
FOR MINNESO TA
Robert W. Desmond, instructor in
the department of journalism, has re-
signed to join the journalism faculty
of the University of Minnesota in
September.
Mr. Desmond came to the Univer-
sity of Michigan in June, 1927, and
taught during the summer session
and the regular school year. of 1927-
28. He had previously been on the
editorial staff of the Milwaukee Jour-
nal, the Paris edition of the New
York Herald, and other' newspapers.
BASEBALL SCORES
(By Associated Press)
American League
Detroit 4, Philadelphia 1."
New York 6, Chicago 3.
St. Louis 6, Boston 5.
Washington 8, Cleveland 0.
National League
New York 10, St. Louis 1.
Philadelphia 4, Chieago 2.
Pittsburgh 4-3, Brooklyn 3-2.
Cincinnati, Boston, rain.

duplication, and the individual re-
'sults will in no way be made public
after the ballot is deposited in the
box. The ballots will then be de-
stroyed immediately after they are
counted in The Daily offices tonight.
The results of the poll will be pub-
lished in Thursday morning's issue
of The Summer Daily.
Candidates Won Before
The poll today is being held to
sound out the strength of th Presi-
dential candidates on the campus,
since, at the poll conducted by The
Daily last March, Hoover and Smith,
who triumphed at Kansas City and
Houston, respectively, were the first
choice of the Republicans and Demo-
crats, respectively, at that time. With
interest at a high pitch this summer,
it is hoped that the results of today's
poll will be indicative of the com-
parative strength of the Presidential
candidates.
LEAGUE TO HOLD
TEA ON THURSDAY
Social entertainment in the form of
a sport party will again be given by
the Women's League, Thursday, Aug.
9, in the new Women's Field House.
Owing to the recent success of the
last league party at Barbour gymna-
sium, the league felt encouraged to
make plan's for one more dance, and
strenuous efforts have been made for
it to be more attractive and popular
than all the previous ones.
Edna Mower's orchestra has been
secured to furnish music for danc-
ing from 8 to 10:30.

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