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August 07, 1928 - Image 1

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Michigan Daily, 1928-08-07

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WEATHER
Cloudy and warmer.

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MEMBER
ASSOC IATED
PRESS

--- - -1

VOL. IX, No. 38 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, AUGUST 7, 1928 PRICE FIVE CENTS

NOREIUSIS WINNER
IN FREE STYLE SWIM;
POLO TEAM DEFEATED
NEW YORK GIRL SETS WORLD
RECORD TO TAKE 400 ,
METER EVENT
DIVERS TO ENTER FINALS
Crabb And Ruddy Place In 1500 Meter
Race; Blankenberg Qualifies
In Breast Stroke
(By Associated Press)
AMSTERDAM, August 6-A bril-
liant championship victory by Mar-
tha Norelius of New York in the wo-
men's 400 meter free style swim and
an unexpectedly severe defeat of the
water polo team at the hands of Hun-
gary 5 to 0 featured the performance
of the American Olympic water sports
representatives today.
Inaddition Clarence Crabb of Ho-
nolulu and Ray Ruddy of New York
finished third and fourth respectively
for the 1500 meter and the free style
final which was won by Arne Borg
of Sweden, also in record breaking
time. Andrew Charlton of Australia,
the former champion, won second
place.I
Run Swimming Preliminaries
There were only two finals on the
day's swimming program but prelim-
inary competition got under way in
the 200 meterbreast stroke swim and
the springboard diving. Thomas
Blankenberg of Oakland, California,
the only American breast stroke en-
try, qualified in the heat won by Eric'
Radamacher of Germany, world's re-
cord holder. in the new Olvmnic re-I

HOOVER CONFERS
WITH POLITICIANS
(By Associated Press)
STANFORD UNIVERSITY, August
6.-Spending his day in a round of
conferences with party leaders and
others, Herbert Hoover decided today
that affairs of the campaign would
not permit realization of his desire
to visit the Sierras in central Call-
Cfornia before the delivery of his ac-
ceptance address next Saturday.
Those who called to see the Re-
publican presidential., candidate dur-
ing the day included William H.
Crocker, Republican national com-
mitteeman from California; and
David Kahn, president of the Cali-
fornia Grape Growers' association,
Matthew Thrush and Carl Lenit of
Boston, both personal friends of
President Coolidge.
SMITH PLANS ANSWER
TO WILLIAM A, WHITE
Returning From Ten Day Vacation,
Al Intends To Inspect Charges Of
Kansas Editor
MUM AS TO EXACT REPLY
(By Associated Press)
ALBANY, New York, August 6.-
Back on his own battle front after
a ten days' vacation absence, Gov-
ernor Smith gathered ammunition to-
day for a defense of his legislative1
record, but he kept mum as to the
use he will make of it. y
When asked point blank if he had
anything to fire in the direction of
William Allen White, the Kansas
editor, who has been one of his most

SPECIAL EDUCATIO N
ISMAL'LER SCHOOLS
IS SUBJECTOF TALI
BERRY SPEAKS TO TEACHERS
ON HANDICAPPED
CHILDREN
TELLS OF SPECIAL NEEDS
Cities Benefits To Be Derived From
Adequate Provision For 14
Proper Training
Defining a handicapped child as
"one who deviates from the type to
such an extent that he requires spe-
cial education to make the most of
his possibilities," Dr. Charles S.
Berry told superintendents and teach-
ers about "Special Education of
Handicapped Children in the Smaller
School System" yesterday afternoon
at the University high school.
"Not less than five per cent of the
pupils of compulsory school age are
handicapped," said Dr. Berry. "The
types included in these figures are
the blind and partically sighted, the
deaf and hard of hearing, the crip-
pled, the anemic and tuberculous, the,
defective in speech, the mentally re-
tarded and the delinquent.
'Through special education it is
possible to develop into useful law-
abiding citizens a large percentage of
the handicapped children who other-
wioe would become a burden and
menace to society.j
Send Worst Cases To Institutions
Dr. Berry then showed how the
worst cases, such as total deafness
and blindness and children with a
sent to the respective state schoo s
at Flint, Lansing, and Lapeer. The'
crippled children should be brought
to Ann Arbor where they will be
treated free of charge if the parents
are unable to pay.
"The work of the school comes
with those children who are not in
such a situation to be placed in the
state schools, but who are yet handi-
capped in relation to the average
child in school. The partially sight-
ed can be aided with books with large
print, large writing materials and
seats near the windows.
Describes Special Room

PRESIDENT LITTLE VOTING AT POLL
CONDUCTED BY DAILY LAST MARCH
.:\J.<....~ AL PRESIDENTIAL,
PoOLL NWEDNESDAY
VOTES MAY BE CAST AT BOTH
NDS OF DIAGONAL AND
AT ANGELL HALL
ISSUES WILL BE OMITTED
Poll Is Being Held On Gamptis In
Order To Ascertain Political

Judgment Of Campaign
Arrangements for the presidential
preference poll to be conducted on
the campus by The Summer Daily to-
?,.morrow were proclaimed complete
yesterday afternoon. The poll is be-
ing held to ascertain the political
audgment on the campus this summer
.in regard to the Presidential cam-
paign and is similar in nature to th~e
poll held by The Daily last March at
which time Herbert Hoover and Al-
fred Smith were the fir'st choice of
the Republicans and Democrats, re-
.:..:.::.:::.:................. spectively.
_ - Votes may be cast at three places on
Here's the way it's done' Picture shows President Clarence Cook Lit- the campus, according to plans an-
tie casting his vote at the Presidential poll conducted by The Daily last nounced yesterday afternoon. Tables
March. He sets a good example for those who are going to vote in Wed- f will be placed at each end of the
ne'sday's poll, *.diagonal and also in front of Angell
hall, and voting will be in charge of
members of the staff of The Summer
Daily. The polls will be open from
BROWN LECTURES urN BOYNTON I9 SPEAKER 'al.Teplswl eoe
9 o'clock in the morning until 5 o'clock
in the afternoon. Results of the poll
MLN will be published in Thursday morn-
ing's Daily.
Voting is being c'mcentrated en-
Says Volatility And Compression Ratio ; New York Superintendent To Be Guest tirely upon the candidates: themselves
Are Qualities That Determine At Educational Club Dinner ,

, usoe ciis heDmcai
cord time of 2 minutes and 52 sec-outspoken critics, the Democratic
onds. Blankenberig finished second. nominee for president said he had- not
In diving Pete Desjornes, Miami I made up his mind what his tactics
Beach, Florida, and Michael Galitan, would be.
better known as "Mickey Riley" of the 1 "I have called for the record and
Los Angeles A. C., qualified for the intend to study it," said the governor,
finals, while the third American en- referring to White's charge originally
try, Harold Smith, Los Angeles A. C., that as an assemblyman Smith fav-
was expected to be admitted to the ored the saloon, gambling and pros-
final competition, although a dispute I titution in his attitude on legislation,
over scoring postponed the decision later modified by White to apply to
in his case until tomorrow. the liquor interests.
"Does that imply that you intend
lto reply to Mr. White?" a reporter
The water polo match was a keen 4 asked the nominee.
disappointment to the Americans. Al-1f ,'llcross that bridge when I come
though not sanguine of victory, the to it," Smith retorted, "I haven't
UhitodittatSmitharetortedpecthaven't
United States team had expected to, seen any of that stuff. I don't want
give the European champions a close, Ito pin myself down until I can study

t
t
t
F
c
i

hard fight. Experta even said it was
a pity to se so much speed go to
waste.
Johnny Weismaller swam several
magnificent meters during the match
but played poor water polo. It was
a girl who provided the high light
performance for the entire day. Cov-
ering 400 meters in 5 minutes 4 4-5
seconds, Miss Norelius made a show
of her field and easily retained her
.-Olympic championship -won- in, 1924.
Her time was 2 3-5 seconds faster
than the world's record she herself
established only Saturday in a pre-
liminary heat.

it."
It is the governor's intention, with
the aid of advisers, to go over in
detail the White charges relating to
the saloon and then to determine
whether a direct reply should be
made. In this examination Smith
will have the aid of Mrs. Henry No-
skowitz, who is in charge of his cam-
paign publicity and ih recent years
one of his most trusted advisers. She
came to Albany last night, accom-
panying the Governor and his family
by motor up the river from Peckskill
where yesterday he reviewed the Na-
tional Guard at Camp Smith.

"SOCIAL REVOLUTION IN AUSTRIA"
IS SUBJECT OF DR. GUERNSEY T ODAY1
"The Social Revolution in Austria" hand, I have met there representatives
will be the subject of an illustrated from almost every European coun-
lecture by Dr. Martha Guernsey, of try, from Japan and Australia, sent
the psychology department, at 5 by their governments to study par-
o'clock this afternoon, in Natural ticularly the program of child wel-
Science auditorium. Dr. Guernsey is fare. In the mid'it of all their post-
the author of several articles in lead- war poverty and political tangle, the
tag scientific journals relative to ge-1 Austrians have been doggedly true
netics. She has been invited to give a burning ideal, namely, that if the
the guest series of four lectures in state is to survive at all, in substance
genetiq psychology next year in Vien- as well as form, its survival must be
na, Prague and Innsbruck. it being based on moral, physical, and spirit-
the second time a woman has been ual regeneration of the coming gen-
invited to fill that post. eration.
"Although the heavy taxation and "To this end they have spent enor-
socialistic distribution of wealth in mous 'ums in organized welfare work,
Austria may be severely criticized," devised many unique social institu,
Dr. Guernsey said in an interview yes-' tions, and passed much "radical" leg-
terday, "the ideals and the excellent islation, such as sterilizing the unfit,
organization of their eugenics and giving advice on marriage, and birth
social welfare program must be a control, legalizing divorce, controlling
source of admiration to every sociolo- private rents, etc. Their most diffi-
gIt and psychologist. cult problems at present," Dr. Guern-
"The Austrian people," Dr. Guern- sey concluded, "are the enormous
sey continued, "are not advertisers numbers of aged people who, a an
and Americans seem to be little aware aftermath of the war, are dependent
of the immensely interesting politi- on the state and the liberation of
_% --A- -,4 .. i..,, t .. -- -. ---n_-k- - - - - .-- -- 4

"This room should be established
with as, little publicity as possible.
A teacher should be selected for it
who has shown unusual interest in
the individual child, and she should
take special training as soon as pos-
sible in one of the Normal schools.
The doors of this room should swing
both ways, that is, neither the par-
ents or children should feel that once
in there is no opportunity of get-
ting out and going on with the reg-
ular grade."
Dr. Berry will continue his .talks
tomorrow afternoon, telling how to
establish a clinic in the smaller com-
munities. He feels that this type
of school has -not had the opportunity
of learning just how much it can
do in the help of the handicapped
Ichild.
HOURS ARE FIXED
F OR "'REGISTERING
In order to facilitate registration
among students and faculty members
for the November election, Fred
Perry, deputy city clerk, will be in
the Secretary's office in University"
hall at 2 o'clock tomorrow afternoon
to register voters who can meet the
requirements of the Michigan regis-
tration laws.
Mr. Perry will move his headquar-
ters to the University Hospital about
three o'clocl in the afternoon to con-
tinue registration.
BASEBALL SCORES
(By Associated Press)
AmE .yn League
Detroit 8, Philadelphia 5.
Chicago 5, New York 4.
15 inn!u;-s.
Clevelanl -2, Waashington.4-11.
National League

Worth Of Gasoline In Union Ballroom
CITES EARLY HISTORY MUSIC TO BE FEATURE
"There are two qualities that deter- Giving the address of the evening,
mine the value of a gasoline: its i Frank D. Boynton, superintendent of
volatility and its compression ratio," schools at Ithaca, New York, will be
said Prof. George G. Brown of the the guest,'of honor at the annual Sum-
chemical engineering department In mer Session. banquet of the Men's
a lecture on "Motor Fuels" delivered and Women's Education clubs to be
at five o'clock yesterday afternoon in held in the ballroom of the Union at
the Natural Science auditorium. 6:30 o'clock "tonight.
"In 1918 the Federal Specification MIr. Boynton, who is president of
Board established a specification for the department of superintendence of
the volatility of gasoline. They re- i the National Education Association,
quired that no fuel could be sold that is well known as a progressive edu-
had a temperature of distillation of cator. His address is considered one
more than 121 degrees Fahrenheit. of the most important of the sum-
The anti-knock value of a gasoline is mer not only because of his wide rep-
little more than a high specification," utation as a speaker, but also be-
Professor Brown explained. I cause of his intimate knowledge ofj
Iproblems that are of interest to every
The lecture was opened with anj
outline of the way pin which gasoline schoolman and woman on the cam-
sprang into prominence as a fuel pus.
oil with the introduction of the mo-I Prof. J. B. Edmoipon of the summer
S car."Previous to 1900 gasoline faculty of the School of Education
was ar wasteproduct," the speaker will be the toastmaster at the ban-
said. , "Today it is the major pro- quet, and the School of Music i to
duct of refining companies. During furnish an interesting musical pro-
the war there was an enormous in- gram as an added feature.
crease in the demand for this par- Tickets f o r t h e banquet are
ticular motor fuel, and refineries on sale at the main desk in the
were hard pressed to furnish enough Michigan Union, and also at the desk
for both the home and for the use mn the hall of the University High
of the army abroad. The gasoline School. It is requested that all de-
with a higher degree of volatility was siring tickets purchase them as early
sent over for the aeroplane and truck as possible.
motors at that time, and the motor P rJS .lH N A
car manufacturers were forced to' PROFESSOR HANNA
design a motor that would be able AUDIENCE WITH DR
to use an oil of less volatility.
"Motor cars today are not built By Howard F. Shout
to run satisfactorily on highly volatile Undoubtedly one of the most inter-
gasoline, since their efficiency is re- esting and entertaining programs of
duced," Professor Brown continued. the summer was heard in Natural
"On,the other hand, too low a volatil- Science auditorium last night whene
ity in the ofil will result in the motor's Prof. Robert Hannah of the speech
being hard to start. Most of the gas- department delivered a, dramatic r3-
olines sold in this part of the country cital of prose and poetry selections.
is volatile at a low temperature. Professor Hannah, who came to the

and not tupon the campaign issues

The ballots will contain the names of
Hoover and Smith with a line left for
any alternrotive candidate. Voters are
Being classified as male and female
and then into three groups cf facul-
ty, graduate students, and regular
'students. A sample ballot will be
printed in Wednesday morning's is-
sue of The Summer Daily.
OWlll Check Ballots
In order to effect a systemi f check-
ing to determine the eligibility of
voters and to prevent duplication, each
votl is requested to sin his ('r her
name to the ballot, altbhcugh no pub-
licity will be given to individual bal-
lots 'and no one, aftor the lallot is
s'.st, will kn::w the identity of the
voter. Ballots will be counted by
memlers of the staf.1 of The Summer
Doily and individual .esuts will re-
nmain strictly conidnd.ntial.
Considerable comment rogarding
the poll has been aroused. in view
of the fact that it is a presidential
year and theJact that the previous
poll indigated correctly ti? strength
of party candidates, it is generally
felt that results should be compaia-
tively interesting in sounding jt the
strength of the presidentia caindi-
dhtes.
The results at the previous poll
were indicative of political judgment
in general since Smith and Hoover
each received the most votes then.
H PLEASES LARGE
AMATIC R E CtTAL
to Instill into his poems, the happy,
arefree spirit of the Atalian immi
grant in this country. Another short
selection by the same author fllow-
ed.
The intensely dramatic scene be-
tween Jean Val jo i. and the good bis-
hop in the novel, "Les Miserables"
ewasg next ldeliverPedi AC th, rpds

PROBATION H E AD
TO SPEAK TODA Y
Fred R. Johnson, chief of the pro-
bation department of the Detroit city
police will deliver a public lecture
on "Probation" at nine o'clock this
morning in room 101 of the Eco-
nomics building.
VARE'S CONDITION
REPORTED BETTER
ATLANTIC CITY, N. J., August 6.
-The condition ofd Senator-Elect Wil-1
1am S. Vare, of Pennsylvania, was

-. -- .,- lt . fls Lareauer
University recently from Cornell, has pointed out, these characters are two
spent many years in speech training of the most vital and interasting ex-
and on the stage. His recital gave amples of human life evar prtrayed
full, evidence of his power and ability by a niovelist. As a variation from
as an interpretational reader. the spiritual strain of this scene, the
The program consisted of a nun) next selection was one of Stephen
ber of widely varied selections of Leacock's humorous essays, "Liter-
well known authors, ranging from ary Lapses."
the cold horror of Edgar Allan Poe's This was succeeded by three short
"Tell Tale Heart" to the light humor poems in, the French-Canadian dialect
of Stephen Leacock. by William Henry Drummond. Then
"The Highwayman," by _Vfred Noy- came the most intensely emotional re-
es, was the first reading. This was cital of the evening, and the one in
interpreted with the true spirit of which Professor Hannah displayed his
the time of the poem, a sort of wild, powers to the fullest extent. This was
reckless joy in life awd love. Follow- the reading of Edgar Allan Poe's "Tell
ing this was a short humorous poem Tale Heart." The program was con-
In Italian dialect by Thomas A. Daly, cluded on a more cheerful note with
r- ._ ..,.. _ - '...w . _ - _U 4 .4., a * 1 . --., - - « .- - :- - -- a -, . 1

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