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June 27, 1928 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1928-06-27

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WEATHER
Lower Michigan, 'ldudy
Wednesday, probably show-
ers. No change in tempera-
ture.

ol 4 p

ummer

£fr i!3tflfl

~Iait

"
MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

VOL. IX, No. 4. " ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 27, 1928 PRICE FIVE CETS

REGISTRATION
FOR SUMER
GROlW LARGBER

FIGURES opens Fight Against
Republican Nominee
SESSION
801 qE

INCREASE IN MEDICAL SCHOOL,
PHARMACY SCHOOL, AND ,
GRADUATE SCHOOL
EXPECT MORE TO ENROLL
Enrollment In Literary College Lower
Than In Previous Years; Also
In School Of Education
Registration .figures for the Summer
Session continued to swell throughout
yesterday as additional students en-
rolled in the various schools and col-
leges of the University. According to
the report submitted by Edward H. I
Kraus, dean of the Summer Session,
there were 319 more registrations
when the recorder's office closed yes-
terday at 4 o'clock than there were on
the day previous. Yesterday's total
registration was 3,131, while a year
ago on that date the number was 3,398.
Excludes Health Institutes
The final registration of last year's
Summer Session indicated an enroll-
ment of 3,667. This figure does not
include the students enrolled in the
Public Health Institutes. Dean Kraus
stated yesterday that in his opinion the
registration to date would be increas-
ed by approximately 300 students be-
fore the week is over.
The increases over last year's figures
are shown in the Medical school, whose1
registration yesterday was 284, or 37
more than the total amount last year,
in the College of Pharmacy with an
increase of three, bringing its total
enrollment to date up to 36, and in the
Graduate School with an enrollment
of 97, or an inreas of 100 over the
registration figures of a year ago.I
Comparison With Last Year
Enrollment figures to date along
with the registrations of a year ago in
the other schools and colleges of the
University are as follows: Literary col-
lege, 865 enrolled to date with the fig-
ure a year ago placed 'at 1,132; Col-
leges of Engineering and Architecture,
312 to date, 340 a year ago; Law
schpol, 148 to date, 158 a year ago;
School of Education, 496 to date, 604
a year ago; School of Business Ad-
ministration, 17 to date, 21 a year
ago.
About 150 students are expected in
the total enrollment for the Public
Health Institutes. This number is not
included in the Summer Session total
enrollment.
The registration of students will
be carried on today and throughout the
week. The delay in registration by
many students is caused by the late
closing of many other colleges and
universities.
BASEBALL RESULTS
American League
Chicago 5, Detroit 2.
Cleveland 3, Bt. Louis 6.
Philadelphia 1, Washington 4.
Only games scheduled.
National League
Brooklyn 5-6, Boston 1-5.
Pittsburgh 1-3, Chicago 0-7.
New York 7, Philadelphia 6. '
Only games scheduled.
NOBILE SEARCH
BLOCKED BY FOG
(By Associated Press)
KINGSBAY, Spitzenbergen, June 26.
-Milder weather without wind brought
fog to the Arctic and again today
tied up the rescue and seach work of
the aviators and mariners who are try-
ing to save survivors of the Nobile ex-
pedition and to discover the where-

abouts of Roald Amundsen's rescue
plane.
The milder weather, however, is
making for better ice conditions. As
soon as the fog blanket lifts the ships
will be able to work closer to the six
men marooned near Foyn Island. The
base ship of the Nobile expedition, Cit-
ta De Milano, may shift her position
to the north entrance of Hinlspen.
Floyd Fitzsimmons has leased Na-
vin field this summer for several out-
door boxing shows.

.; : :::.:I

STATE NEEDS MORE
PARKS OF BEAUTY,
WHITTEMORE CLAIMS
LANDSCAPE DESIGN PROFESSOR
CA LLS MICHIGAN SYSTEM
INADEQUATE
GIVES ILLUSTRATED TALK
Einploys )antern Slides To Show
Audience Natural Beauty Of Land
Reserves Throughout Country
"The citizens of the state of Michi-
gan should admit to themselves that
they have a great deal to do even
yet in the bettering of their park sys-
tem," said Professor P. 0. Whittemore
in an illustrated lecture delivered yes-
terday afternoon at 5 o'clock in the
Natural Science auditorium. "All this
despite the fact that they have over 50
parks in the state at the present," he
added, "because a grea many of these
so-called parks are nothing more
than camping places."
Maine Was First
Professor Whittemore began his talk
by defining a park, laying especial
emphasis on the need for some more
parks of natural beauty and for fewer
that have no other purpose in their
establishment than to advertise the lo-
cality or to furnish camping places for
the tourists that pass that way. Then
with the aid of a series of beautiful
illustrations he carried his audience
on a journey to all the most beautiful
parks in North America.
The first state visited 'was Maine
where the granite mountains sweep
majestically down to the Atlant-
ie. Next came the beautiful Smoky

Sixteen,
Have
Sixteen stud
school were

Egineers
All ',A' Cards
ents in the Engineering
named yesterday in

1E

t

Senator James Reed
Who yesterday provided the fire-
works at the Democratic convention
by charging Hoover with fixing food
prices during the war and thus being
responsible for the present plight of
the American farmer. The senator's
backers continue to hope,g in spite of
the increasing 'strength of Smith.

REED A
HOOVER
IN FIER

PLAN MANY FEATI
FOR LEAGUE BUlL
-Munge, In Which life Of
Will Center, Dedicated
Ethel iussey
WILL ATTRACT ALU

FTA CKS
WORK

'URES
.DING
Edifice
ToN
ANAEL

I Mountain Park in the Tennessee'
3While the Women's League building Iouitalns
may soon be complete in one sense, ' Take Side Trips
yet in, another sense it will never be "This park," Professor Whittemore
complete, for every year new books, I stated, " is undoubtedly the Most beau-
new furniture, new rugs, ia,nd many tiful park in the eastern half of the
other features will be added. It will, United States." The next place visited
be especially fitting for returnning was Estes Park in Colorado, where
alumnae who stay for a few days at broad vistas and dim blue haze roll
the League building. out to meet the distant Rockies. Then
The lounge, where much of the life the journey continued through Mesa
of the building will center, will be a Verde Park, Brice Canyon, the Grand
memorial to Ethel Fountain Hussey. Canyon, and Sequoia National Park, to
On both sides of the lounge there will the great Yosemite National Park,
'be large livinlg rooms. One will be which, Professor Whittemore esti-
for women, and one will be for both mated, is visited by more than two
men and women and will open into the hundred thousand people annually.
assembly hall where dances will be Then north to the Volcano parks in
held on Friday and Saturday nights. the Canadian Rockies. Of course, the
There will be a large enclosed gar- journey ended at the world's paradise,
den, upon which all wings of the build- Yellowstone National Park, and the
ing will open. The alumnae of Cin- mystery and .vastness of the Geyser
cinnati hope to be able to place a Basin, the majestic, many colored

the recorder's office as recipients of
all "A" grades during the last se-
mester. They are: Bosilo D'Alleva,
'30E. Clarence Chapman, '28E, Pierce
Farrar, '29E, Wilfred Grieg, '28E, Ed-
ward Yendall, '30E, Edward Fisher,
'31E, Allen Forbes, '30 E, Harold Gib-
son, '30E, Willis Wicks, '28E, Louis
Levine, '29E, Garland Misinger, '31E,
Edward Ravenscroft, 28E, Winifred
Reichle, '28E, Wilburn Schroeder, '30E,
Ray Hoisington, '28E, and Arne Ander-
son, '31E.
UNION REVOKES RULE
AGAINST CARD-PLAYING
Facilities Of Building At Disposal
Of Students Enrolled In
Summer Session
POOL TO BE OPEN DAILY
Lifting of the ban against card
playing in the Union was announced
by the assistant house manalg;er to-
day. He also stated that all Union
facilities with the exception of the
bowling alleys and billiard room
would be open to Summer schdol stu-
dents.
Action lifting the card playing ban
was taken at the last meeting of the
board of directors, held on May 26.
It was voted that the ban would be
taken off from commencement day un-
til .urther action by the directors.
The swimming pool, located in the
basement, will be open for men from
1:00 until 6:00 every day. If a suf-
ficient demand later develops, the pool
will be held open util 11:00 p .m.
Women will have the use of the pool
each morning except Friday and Sat-
urday.
The cafeteria or tap-room will serve
from 7:00 until 2:00, and from 5:00
until 7:30. The soda bar, located in
the same room will serve from 11:00
until 7:30.
Meals will be served in the main
dining room and on the terrace at the
following hours on week days: break-
fast, 7:00 to 9:30; luncheon, 12:00 to
1:30; and dinner, 6:00 to 7:30. The
hours for the corresponding meals on
Sunday are 8:00 to 10:30; 1:00 to
2:30; and 6:00 to 7:30. The terrace
has lately been enclosed with glass
and summer school students will have
the first opportunity to use it since
that improvement.
President Remains
Cool As Democrats
Gather At Houston
(By Associated Press)
SUPERIOR, Wis., June 26.-The
opening of the Democratic convention
in Houston today caused no ripples in
the ordinary White House routine here
President Coolidge's quiet and sunny
life on the Brule river was disposed
to continue without interruption, with
attention being devoted to what busi-
ness was at hand but with the natural
beauty and the open air recreations of
Cedar Island lodge claiming first place
in the day's activities.
Mr. Coolidge had no closer contact
with events at Houston than the aver-
age voter, the daily press and the
radio being his only sources of infor-
mation. The radio at the lodge, how-
ever, has proved very unsatisfactory
so far owing to intereference caused

by the little power station on the es-
tate itself.
Mr. Coolidge was said to be, out-
wardly at least, far more interested at
present in learning how to paddle a
canoe than in watching the Democrat.
ic party. John Larock, his Chippewa
guide, has been taking the chief ex-
ecutive out on the Brule teaching him
how to guide his paddle and how to
keep the fragile craft on its course
without shifting from side to side.
Duluth, just across the Minnesota
border, Monday received its. first ex.
citement from the transference of the
White House to the head of the lakes
v hn Mr. Coolidge motored there tC
S. it a hair dresser.

British and allied uyers , It was
one of the strongest of the many
attacks Reed has leveled at his arch

foe, Hoover, since the Republican
nominee took office as food adminis-
trator during the war.
Reed undaunted
Undaunted by the increasing claims
of the Smith forces, the silver haired
campaigner' turned loose his state-
ment against Hoover today as part
of his campaign for the Democratic
nomination. He coupled with it a
brief reiteration of his decliaration for
law and service, expressing amuse-
ment at the construction placed upon
the claims that "I +have changed my
views with reference to sustaining the
law and constitution."
While Reed was blasting away at
Hoover, hi's allies in the battle against
Smith, the drys from the South, were
turning their attention to the plat-
form contest, leaving for the moment,
if not for good, the presidential situ-
ation. The band of southerners are
still hopeful that the lineup of Reed
and their favorite sons candidates can
hold intact sufficient votes to block
Smith, but they are more intent Just
now on getting their dry plank into
the platform.
Drys Leery (f Reed
. The hesitancy of drys to accept
Reed forthwith 4s their candidate is
the anti-Smith campaign was believed
by some to have been reflected in
their continued silence but Reed feels
he will be the ultimate rallying point
if Smith is stopped.
In his statement today the Missouri
serautor laid the "desperate condition"
of the farmer directly to Hoover as
food administrator during the war and
to the Fordney-McCumber Tariff Act
which he said was "fully sanctioned.
and approved by Hoover."

WORK BEGUN ON TEN
NEW TENNIS COURTS
Yost Announces Letting Of Contracts
For Additions To University
Athletic Plant
REMODEL _SKATING RINK
Work on additions to Michigan's al-
ready fine athletic plant was inaugu-
rated this week with the starting of
construction of ten tennis courts on
the land adjoining the Coliseum, the
home of the University's indoor ice
sports.
Simultaneous with the beginning of
construction of the tennis courts,
Fielding H. Yost, director of intercol-
legiate athletics, has announced the
letting of contracts for the installation
of ice-making machinery in the Coli-
seum and for the building of 16 addi-
tional tennis courts on Palmer field.
the playgroud for women studehts of
the University.
The contract for the ice refrigerat-
ing machine calls for one that will
have the capacity to maintain ice on
the Coliseum rink the whole year
around if desired. The fact will per-
mit ice skating to start in the fall as
desirable and to continue late in the
spring. This, in turn, will also enable
the Michigan hockey team to start
practice earlier, an impossibility here-
tofore. It' will also assure a definite
schedule of home games.
In addition to the installation of the
ice-making machinery, the entire Coli-
seum will be remodeled to seat 3,000
spectators and to provide dressing and
training rooms for the hockey teams.

Y

TILT

i

CHARGES FOOD PRICES WERE JUGGLED
TO BENEFIT FOREIGN BUYERS;
SEEKS FARM SUPPORT
(By Associated Press)
H I C)US'PO\, lexas, J une 2.-j im" Reed of Missouri fired
away at the common foe of his party-Herbert Hoover, Republican
presidential nominee-today as he held the trenches for the hopeful
but wavering line of anti-Smith forces.
H erbert Hoover fixed the price of American food products
during the war. Reed charged, for the purpose of benefitting "the
D -. -'.1 - 11 I

t
a
3
r
t

I

specially

designed Rookwood ' foun- mountains, and the

beautiful canyon

tamt in it. Here tea may be served in
the tafternoon.
The cafeteria gill serve meals three
times 'a day. In the afternoon and in
the evening the cafeteria will be con-
verted into a tea room where the
women may entertain their guests in
the afternoon.

of the Yellowstone river, left the au-
dience with a dim sense of the great
beauty that is to be found in this
America of ours.
Two side trips were taken in the
course of the journey, one to Mount
McKinley in Alaska, and the other to
Hawaii Park in the Hawaiian Islands.

E
1
i

"The farmer has a right to demand," rTe construction of tennis courts
Reed declared, "and I am in favor of around the Coliseum will enhance the
giving him every aid the government beauty of the structure and provide
can constitutionally expend, to the recreational activities about a block
end that he may be afforded every pro- nearer the campus. Clay for the ten
tection and advantage which by law courts in the vincinity of the Coliseum
is extended to any other class, and and those for Palmer field was secured
so far as 'possible shall sell at,the while excavating for the stadium last
same level on wihich he is compelled summer.
to buy." All of the courts will be available
for play when the fall semester opens
More than 360,000 people visited next September, it has been announced
the Spring Fair at Lyons, France. by Director Yost.
UNIVERSITY OFFERS WOMEN
VARIED PHYSICAL COURSES

i

ARCHITECT'S SKETCH OF LOUNGE
IN WOMEN'S LEAGUE BUILDING

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"Classes in physical education which
are being offered to the women en-1
rolled in Summer school, are un-
usually numerous and varied this
year," stated Dr. Margaret Bell, headj
of the department of physical edu-!
cation. "Swimming, natural dancing,
bowling, golU, and tennis classes have
already begun, and are rapidly be-
comihg filled.
"I should think women in the teach-
ing profession would be particularly.
interested in the two classes in
Natural Dancing, which Miss Van
Tuyle teaches at 11 and 4 every day of
the week. These classes are open to
everybody, and would be invaluable to
the teacher who is interested in con-
serving her own strength, and gaining
the interest of her pupils.
"Natural dancing deals essentially
with work for body control, and true
and sincere self expression, and in de-
veloping an understanding and appre-
ciation' of music, and incidently, while
it deals with rhythm, it teaches people
to relax, and with more perfect relax-
ation, comes better sleep, and control

of resting.
"When I was in Chicago, a few
weeks tago, talking with several older
and prominant women on this subject
of physical education classes they
were particularly interested in natu-
ral dancing, because of the facilities
in this field we could offer them at
Michigan. We have the equipment
,and conveniences oif the new field
house to work with, and the best
teaching and music available. I think
that the average woman realizes the
pecuniary value of such lessions."

DAILY TRYOUTS
Students enrolled in the Sum-
mer Session and desirous of
obtaining practical journalistic
experience may report at the
office's of The Summer Michisain
Daily in the Press building be-
tween 2 and 5 o'clock anly after-
noon this week. Practical exper-
fence is offered both in the busi-
ness and editorial departments

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.M- .ms .G 'c

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