100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

August 05, 1928 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1928-08-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

;

u", 4 r

,*. am mrx

WEATHER
Unsettled and continued
' em I i.

Ar
CALmpqw 411k-,
4f [t ll k B3
r

it

MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

- f

.,,m .., ,._ --

TY

VOL. IX, No. 37

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, AUGUST 5, 1928

PRICE FIVE CENTS

---_.___

"SPECIAL EDUCATION'
IS CONFERENCE TOPIC
DURING CLOSIMO WEE
SIXTH GROUP OF DISCUSS1ONS
ON CHILD TRAINING TO
BEGIN TOMORROW
BERRY TO START SERIES
Trowbridge Will Speak On "Charctei
Education;" Frostie On "Efficient
School Buildings"
"Special Elducation" will be the
theme for the final week of the in-
formal conference course, given by
the School of Education for school
men and women, which begins to-
morrow afternoon.
The course when completed will
have taken up six weeks of the sum.
mer course and included 23 lectures
and' conferences. There were six ma-
jor divisions of education as the
themes of the conferences.
Berry To Open Series
The theme for this week will be
opened by Dr. C. S. Berry, who will
discuss, "Special Education in Small
Centers." While the discussion will
show what can be accomplished by
special education in the smaller com-
munities, it is expected also to be
valuable for any community, for all
cities and towns in the 'state have
some children who come under this
class and who, at the present time,
are going without any special atten-
tion. According to Dr. Berry, 5 per
cent of the children are handicapped
and need special attention. He will
explain what to do with children of
this type, showing especially what
smgaller communities might hope to
accomplish along this line of endeav-
or.
Dr. Berry will continue his talk on
handicapped children on Tuesday
when he will center, his discussion
around "The Service Clinic." He Will
point out types of clinl%, how they
may be established, and what can be
accomplished by means of the clinic.
Agaii. he will show what can be done
in the smaller communities where
nothing is being accomplished at the
present. time, largely through lack
of knowledge on the subject. Dr.
Berry is advocating a travelling _clin-
ic, under the supervision of the state
department of education, this clinic
to be composed of trained workers
in this field. They will endeavor to
cooperate with school and health of-
ficials in each community.
Discuss Character Building
"Character Education" will be the
subject for Wednesday and the lecture
will b'e given by Prof. W. C. Trow-
bridge. He will indicate in his talk
the imhortance of character training
and ltow it has passed from the con-
trol of the home and is now given
largely through the schools. Efforts
along the line of school, men to im-
prove instructions in this type of edu-
cation will be shown and specific
sugge'stions will be given, to make
this problem morg easily solved by
the average school man, working in
the field.
On Thursday Supt. F. W. Frostic of
Wyandotte will discuss "Efficient
School Buildings." He Is the third of

school superintendents of the state
to iappegr on thb conference pro-
grams this summer. He has had much
experience in school buildings pnd is'
expected to give constructive thoughts
along ,'he lne not only of build-
ing new schools, but also of utiliz-
ing the schools already in operation.
BASEBALL SCORES
(By' Associated Press)
American League
Philadelphia 7, Detroit 4.
Washington 1, Cleveland 2.
New York 8, Chicago 6.
10 innings.
Boston 3, St. Louis 11.
National League
St. Louis 3-1, Boston 2-2.
First game 10 innings.
Pittsburgh 14-11, Philadelphia 8-4.
New York 13-10, Cincinnati 3-9.
Chicago 16, Brooklyn 3.,

WISCONSIN F L Y E R
WINS AIR DERBY
JiOhi P. Wood
Of Wasan, Wisconsin, who won the
national reliability a'ir tour which
was just completed recently. The tour
included a 6,300 mile circle of the
eastern h alf of the United States, stop-
ping at 32 cities.W

DETROIT SUBURB
TO SEND YOUNG
MUSICIANS HERE
For the first time in the history of
the Summer Session. a hu blQi hcr,
musical organization will appear i on
the university program, when the
symphony orchestra of Hamt ramck
High School under- the direction of
Stacey Hoblmes plays, this Wednesday
evening in Hill auditorium.
This innovation in the regular ser-
ies of entertainments offered by the
university to summer students is be-
ing watched with interest on the cam-
pus. Dean Edward H. Kraus has ex-
pre'ssed himself as being of the opin-
Wion that it will be a distinct contri-
bution to public school education in
the state in that it will demonstrate
to teachers and educators on the
campus what is being accomplished
along the line of music in the pub-
lic schools.
Arrangements for bringing the or-
chestra here were made through
Supt. M. R. Keyworth of the Ham-
tramck school system, who Is a -iem-
ber of the summer faculty of the
School of Education. Prof. Earl V.
Moore and Pres. C. A. Sink, both of
the School of Music have stated their
unqualified approval of the concert.
Mr. Sink, joining with Dean Kraus in
inviting the Hamtramck rg'anization
to appear here said that he thought
it would be very worth while to have
a representative musical organization
here during the Summer Session in-
order that educators throughout the
state might learn what the best high,

FINLAND TAKES FIRST
THREE STEEPLECHASE!
PLACES AT OLYMPICS

LOUKOLA

DEFEATS NURMI

ASI

RITOLA IS FORCED TO
QUIT RACE
SPENCER IS RELAY STAR
Canadians Lower Women's 400 Meter
Relay Record In Olympic
Trials Yesterday
- STANDINGS
United States ..............151f
Finland..................98
Germany ...................43
Sweden.................... 41
Great Britain .............40
Canada....................33
Japan....................15
South Africa.14
France ..... ....... 13
Ireland .................1. 10 f
Norway7...................7
I Hungary................. 5
H aiti .......... ......... . 5
Italy......................4
Philippines.................3
Switzerland ................1
Holland ...................1
(By Associated Press)
AMSTERDAM STADIUM, Holland,

TO TAKE WALKING
TOUR! WITH GENE
{ I
$r
T4.
Thmornton il der

OOSTERBAAN SIGNS TO
RETURN AS FULL TIME
ATHLETI CCACH HERE
MICIIIGAN'S FAMOUS ATHLETE
WILL RETURN TO ALMA
MATER IN FALL
YOST VERIFIES STATEMENT
Football, Basketball And Baseball
Star Will Assist In Each Sport
And General Program
It was officially announced yester
day afternoon at the offices of the
Athletic Association and verified by
Fielding H. Yost, director of inter
collegiate athletics, that Bennie G.
Oosterbaan, Michigan's famous nine-

WO KfITO ABANDON JOURNEYl
California Will Attend To Business
Of Party Over Week-end; Will
Take Vacation Tuesday

;

i
ij
l
ri
I
'
,
! i
.
I

schools are doing +o promote mu'sic. August 4.-Finland's hardy sons
TO MEET DAVIS MONDAY _ _again swept the boards today in the
.IOlympie steeple chase final taking
S (By Associated Press) the first three places to monopolize
STANFORD UNIVERSITY, August the 'victory flagstaff but the Nurmi
4.-Changing his mind overnight Her- PLRitola dynasty that had been consid-
bert Hoover today abandoned his con- r L C ered impregnable was toppled for the
templated trip to Bohemia, Califor- U, t ILN LUfirst time.
nia, well to the north of San Franc- . -On a cold rainswept course under
isco to attend "Nanda" the annual Smith Will Discuss Campaign Issues conditions that made this tough event
play of the Bohemian club of which With Den cratic Party Leaders tougher Nurmi looked more like a
he Is a member. At Eeeutive Mansion bald old man than at any previous
After getting his acceptance ad- ;time finished second and the hitherto
dress out of the way late last night.WAS TO V iT S I ! famous ironman Willie Ritola, the
the Republican presidential candidate ALSH TO VISIT SMITH ampion, Wile R o
found such an accumulation of mail qi hl asr on
and details ofa a ffairs awai (By Associated Press) Finn, Poivo Loukola galloped on to
antio party affairs awaitig NEW YORK, August 4.-In the se- win in record breaking fashion.
his attention that he deemed it ad- eclusion of the executive mansion at Loukola a twenty-two year old Hel-
visable to give them his attention over Albany, Gov. Smith not only intends singfors chauffeur beat the great
the week-end. during the next fortnight to put into Nurmi by fifty yards in the startling
Beginning next Tuesday he may cktime of 9 minutes 21 and 4-5 seconds
mak anthe auomoiletri ino Iblack and white his views regarding
make another automobile trip ito campaign issues, but to confer with for the 3,000 meter chase over hurdles
the California mountains for a few and waterjumps, surpassing Ritol's
days of rest and recreation in the various Democratic leaders, among
I them some who opposed him in the record made in the 1924 games by
dw~ in ivn df f ha niin

ivenst winner ofthe Puitzei letter athlete and 1927 Varsity foot-
prize, who will accompany Gene Tun-
ball captain will return to Ann Arbor
ney on a walking tou througheErt- this fall in the capacity of full time
ope in the near future. athletic coach.
Bennie's contract, which will be-
HANNAH TO PRcome effective September 1, 1928,
states that he will act as head fresh-
man football coach, assistant Var-
sity basketball coach, and that he
will assist generally with Michigan's
athletic program. In accepting the
Popular And Classic Readings From contract, Oosterbaan turned down
Drummond, Hugo, Leacoek, Noyes, numerous professional offers which
And Poe Will Be Given called for a much larger salary than
he will receive from his Alma Mater.
APPEARED WIT H AR L I S S During his three years in athletics
here, Oosterbaan won nine Varsity
Aletters; three in football, three in
Appearing in a special summer pro-
basketball and three in baseball. The
gram, Dr. Robert Hannah of the football, basketball and baseball
Speech department will present a teams each won two Big Ten titles
series of carefully selected readings during this period, and it was Ooster-
at eight o'clock Monday evening in baan who materially helped in win-
the Natural Science auditorium. The ning each championship. He was
thrice selected as all-American end,
selections are both classic and pope- and was twice chosen on the mythical
lar in character, and include prose all-Conference basketball quintet.
and poetry. The readings will be Bennie was also Conference high
interpretational. scorer in football, second high scorer
The program, as outlined by Doctor in football, Conference high, scorer in
Hannah, will include some of the basketball, and one of the leading
works of Alfred Hoyes, the English hitters on the baseball team during
poet, humorous selections by Stephen his three years of athletic competi-
Leacock, a few of the French-Cana- Lion.
dian poems of Dr. William Henry ; At the present time Oosterbaan is
Drummond, some cuttings from Vic- in charge of a boy's camp in North-
tor Hugo's "Les Miserables," ore or ern Michigan. He will return early
two of the short stories of Edgar Al- this fall .to take up his new coaching
r~n P n nnl air.v.I - 41., F-,4- !duties.

i

l
7
1
1
i

reawoos sin a vance otentfc-,ighfor the peieta nominaion
tion ceremonies in Stanford Stadium flight for the presidential nomination
nn+ ~ ttrl~sa~nrnr ln~n- at Houston.

!I

next saturday afternoon. Detaiis are
yet to be worked out but thh nominee
will go either to the Yosemite Na-
tional Park or near there. It was
I stated that the journey would not
be as strenuous as that recently to
Northern California and Southern
Oregon.
Before leaving Hoover will confer
Monday with Dwight Davis, Secretary
of War, who is here en route to Hon-
olulu and also with some party lead-
ers although the more important of
his political conferences will be put
over until late next week and early
in the week following he starts back
to Washington, via his birthplace at
West Branch, Iowa, where he is to
make his second speech of the cam-
paign.
Reports to the candidate show that
the campaign machinery which has,
been set up under his direction in, all!
parts of country is ready to function.
STAGE TO LOSE
COMEDY LEADER
(By Associated Press)
NEW LONDON, August 4.-Fred
Stone today had only an even chancel
of returning to the stage whosel
boards he has trod for a quarter of
a century as a vaudeville and musical
comedy star.
Both legs, his right thigh, left
wrist and lower jaw fractured and
with sundry other dislocations and
bruises he was "doing nicely" in
Lawrence Memorial hospital where
he was taken after the airplane in
which he was making a solo flight
crashed near Trumbull flying field
Friday.
The doctors said only time would
tell whether his broken bones would
knit sufficiently for him to resume
his antics on the stage. They said
it might be two months and it might
be a year before he could walk again.

I A..V -1. ..Y ry .....,. ._____c__ __________ _

As
with
with

tue Democratic nominee, along
other Yorkers, sweltered today,
a variety of political conferences

nearly 12 seconds.
Relays Complete Day
Relay trials completed the day
footracing program producing sensa-
tional performances on a watery

on his calendar, he looked forward track. American teams cane through
to moving up the Hudson Sunday to all their tests in winning fashion in
the state capital which, after all, is, the men's 400 and 1,600 meter races
home. and the women's 400 meter finals in
Once he returns to the executive all of which will share the final day's
mansion-and his arrival there is spotlight with the Marathon. A
booked for Sunday night after he world's record for the women's 400

an .oe, and several of the Italian-
dialect poems of Thomas A. Daly.
Doctor Hannah has studied speak- FLIERS BELIEVED
ing and acting in many places in the HOLDING COURSE
I United States, and under men that__
are recognized as authorities in this (By Associated Press}
field. He has studied with Prof. S. A. LONDON, August 4-A possible er-
Clark, former head of the ,Depart- ror in transmission of longitude be
ment of Speech at the University of the British steamship Amakura fwas
Chicago, with Leland T. Powers in advanced tonight by Pilot Franz, of
Boston, and with Arthur Edward the Amakura, in speaking of Major
Phillips, teacher and author of Kim- Kubala and Idzikowski, as the basis
ball Hall, Chicago. He has also spent for the report that the Polish flyers
several years on the stage, appearing had turned back toward Europe.
with George Arliss in "Disraeli," in "All or nothing," the aviators are
Henry Davis' "Every Woman" and in! reported to have told intimate'friends
several other well-known plays. before the take-off at Le Bourget. The
The program' Monday evening is unanimous opinion of persons in clo-
open to the public. I C mihxil n f. +ha

I
'

stops at a National Guard camp near
Peekskill for an inspection-he will
face the necessity of rounding out1
his acceptance sieech which will be
delivered two weeks from Wednesdayx
night.
In addition, Smith has requested

meter relay was broken by the Cana-
dian team and equaled by the Ameri-
can quartette in winning their respec-
tive heats in 49 2-5 seconds and 49
4-5. Ray Barbuti, 400 meter hero
anchored the 1,600 meter team which
beat the Canadians but Bud Spencer

Senator Walsh of Montana to talk of Stanford University, making his
over the political situation with him, first appearance of the game, ran the
and is planning to discuss the outlook fastest leg which was 48 1-5 seconds.
with others who made a bid for the The British team anchored by Doug-
Democratic presidential nomination. las Lowe, 800 meter champion, reg-
Smith himself has not disclosed istered the best time despite the fact
whom he will talk with before launch- that: it had the worst conditions, run-
ing into his campaign, but is is ex- ning in a pouring rain. Germany,
pected that an increasing number of France and Sweden also qualified for
party leaders will be invited. the finals.
HENDERSON SA YS THAT PAST SEASON
HAS BEEN BEST ONE IN ANN A R B O R
"From the standpoint of the players showed that "Chicago" and "Merton
in the company, I think that the pro- of the :ovies" were favored as the
ductions of "Much Ado About Noth- two best plays of the season. The
ing" in costume have been more suc- votes fitr these two plays for first
cessful in costume than in modern place w<.re about even, and were far
dress," said Robert Henderson, direc- more in number than those for "Much
tor of the Rockford Players, in an in- Ado About Nothing" which rated
terview last night at the close of their next.
Shakespearian bill and third sum- "I sirerely believe that this has
mer season in Ann Arbor. been th best season we have ever
"The performance in modern dress had in Ann Arbor both from the
were more or less of an experiment," standpoint of plays given and the en-
re continued, "to find out which way thusiasin of the awilences," Mr. Hen-
the play jvould be most enjoyable. I derson stated. "This will probably
think, too, that the audiences have be our last season in Ann Arbor, at
been more pleased with the perfor- least for some years, and it is a fond
mances in costume." farewell that we bid to those who
A count of the customary votes on have played such a part in making
the season's most -popular plays I the season a success."

This special program is expected toj
draw a large audience inasmuch as
it is so varied and interesting in its
subject matter. The readings will
begin promptly at the hour specified.
FRANK BOYNTON
TO GIVE SPEECH:

sest touen with preparations tor the
flight is that the flyers were out to
accomplish their purpose or die in
the attempt.
The fact is emphasized that both
the Aztez and the Amatura reported
that the plane wa's in no annarent
difficulty. It is argued that if the
cliers had been in trouble Pr in doubt

about their ability to reach port they
Frank D. Bonyton, Superintendent I would have come down near one of
of Schools at Ithaca, New York, and the ships.
President of the Department of Sup-
erintendence of the National Euca-: BROWN TO SPEAK
tion Association will speak atthe an BE
nual Summer Session banquet of the ON MO TOR FUELS
Men's and Women's Club of the

School of Education. The banquet
will be held in the ballroom of the
Michigan Union at 6:30 Monday night,
August 6.
This banquet is one of the summer
functions of the school of education
and gives opportunity for those here
in residence to_hear Mr. Bonyton. Mr.
J. B. Edmonson of the school of. edu-
cation faculty will be toastmaster.
The School of Music will furnish mu-
sic for the occasion. This is the one
affair of the summer in which the
Men's and Women's Education Clubs
act jointly. Tickets are on sale at
the desk in the Michigan Union and
at the desk in the hall of University
Hmh School..

"Motor Fuels" is the title of a lec-
ture to be delivered by Prof. George
G. Brown of the chemical engineering
department at 5 o'clock tomorrow in
Natural Science auditorium. Profes-
sor Brown is a graduate of New York
university who did his graduate work
here and has been teaching here
since 1920.
Tomorrow's lecture will trace the
development of gasoline from the pre-
automobile era, when it was a waste
product, to the present time. The ef-
fect of changing conditions of supply
and demand upon its quality, and the
relationship between its quality and
its efficiency as a motor fuel will be
other topics treated.

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan