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August 04, 1928 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1928-08-04

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PAGE TWO

THE SUMMER MICHICAN DAI Y

SATURDAY. AUGUST 4, 1928

-a 4 0M ova

t i aunntr
ir Iiivan wr1
Published every morning except Monday dut-
ing the University Summer Session by the
Board in Control of Student Publications.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited to it ortnot otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news
published herein.
. Entered at the Ann Arbor, Michigan, post-
ofce as second class matter.
Subscription by carrier, $z.so; by mail, $z.7s.
Offices: Press Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4M
MANAGING EDITOR
J. STEWART HOOKER
Editorial Directors.......George E. Simons
Martin Mol
City Editor............Lawrence R. Klein
Feature Editor.............. Eleanor Scribner
Music and Drama Editor.......Stratton Buck
Books Editors............Kenneth G. Patrick
Kathryn Sayre

/

Nil
Alex Bochnowski
Robert Dockeray
Howard Shout
Margaret Zahm
Isabel cbarles

flht Editors
CI
Reporters
R

Martin Mol
George Simons
arence Edelson
Robert O'Brien

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
RAY WACHTER
Advertising............. Lawrence Walkley
Advertising...............Jeannette Dale
Accounts........ ..Whitney Manning
Circulation........ .Bessie V. Egeland
Assistants
Samuel LukensJ Lillian Korvinsky
Janet Logic
SATURDAY, AUGUST 4, 1928
Night Editor-ROBERT DOCKERAY

THE DAILY POLL
Next Wednesday The Daily will co
duct a presidential preference pc
in which all students and membe
of the faculty of the Summer Sessi
will be eligible to vote. Just pr
vious to the national conventionsc
the two major parties' this paper co
ducted a presidential primary pa
the results of which indicated th
campus voters were of the opin
which seemed to be prevalent at th
time in regard to party choices fc
nominees.
Wednesday's straw vote will be f
a different purpose in that only t
choice for president will be indicate
on the ballot. The results should b
highly interesting whether or n
they can be considered a criterion c
the final outcome of the Novemb
election. ,During this campaigni
seems to be quite a common occu
rence for "staunch" Republicans I
bolt their party to support Smit]
and vice-versa. For that reason t
' results of the balloting in the Dail
poll probably cannot be considere
an indication as to whether this is
Republican or Democratic campus
Neither can they be accepted as
true indication of the popular de
cision of the great mass of America:
voters.
Before election day the voters o
the country will have heard nearl:
every known type of political prop
ganda. They will be harangue
nearly to death, and the mobs will b
influenced by the popular appeal o
one or the other of the candidates
As members of a University, however
the students and faculty members ar
a selected group. They are suppos-
edly representatives of the intellec-
tual element of the country and a
such are expected to base their de-
cisions upon a kee4 judment of facts
made only 'after some reflection upon
the merits of the nominees and the
policies of the parties which they
represent. Party preference will
possibly be secondary to preference
for candidates, and if it is the Daily
poll should be an interesting record
of the decisions of thinking voters.
ep
U. S. IN THE OLYMPICS
Surprises and upsets in te 1928
Olympic games have not been con-
lined entirely to the track and field,
judging from the recent story which
appeared in a London newspaper. Un-
der the heading of "Secret of United
States Olympic Failures," the Even-
ing Standard of this week suggests
that "lavish feeding has led to the
undoing of the United States team in
the Olympic games at Amsterdam,
where at the start of Thursday's sport
they were still without a single vic-
tory in the track events."
All of which is probably as un-
founded as it is amusing. Anyone
who knows the care and precision
which gaverns the selection of the
Yankee trainers and coaches, knows
very well that such a rumor could
contain little of the truth. Ameri-
can athletes, more than those of any
other nation, have in the past been
noted for their rigid training rules,
and the there fact of their losing sev-
eral events to stars of other nations
gives little cause for alarm, either

as regards their own excellence or
their adherence to training regula-
tions. As a matter of fact, it is
perhaps for the best; certainly it
makes for greater competition and
competition makes for greater inter-
est in the games themselves. In the
final analysis, the scores at the end
.of the first few days are sufficient to
indicate that America as yet is good
enough to hold down the top position
in the standings.
After all, it is gratifying to learn
that the statement regarding the so-
called secret of the so-called failure
of American athletes to "place" in
the Olympics, comes from an Eng-
lish and not an American source.
TO POLICE THE SKIES
Otto E. Shreiber, a German profes-
sor, predicts that within a few years
(all American and European coun-
tries will have flying police forces.
He is a little late with his prediction
for there are a few American cities
which have already added an air-
plane or two to their fleets of motor-
cycles and patrol wagons, but the
question is whether or not this will
become a univeral practice.
When burglars and stick-up men
had to depend upon their ability to
run to avoid arrest, policemen were
cinder path athletes. Later when
highwaymen took to horses, vigilantes
and mounted police were detailed for
patrol duty, and after bandits had
taken to the automobile to make a
get-away the police were furnished
with automobiles and motorcycles.
The innovations into the police de-
partment were not generally made
until the crooks had introduced fast-
er methods of transportation.
But with all the developments that
have been made, it is interesting to
note that no one type of police de-
partment has replaced all of the oth-
ers. There is still the pavement
pounder of the city police force as
well as the mounted police and the
motorcycle cop. But each division
of the police department has been
developed for more extensive purpos-
es than that for which it was orig-
inally introduced. The patrolman
still has his beat to cover except
where he has been rep ieed by the
"flivver-squad" whien can cover more
ground more efficieiitly from the
standpoint of getting to disorders of
any k4,.d. but the ms.unted police in
cities no longer are detailed to run
ds p horse thieves and highwaymen;
they are occupied as traffic men.
Coast guards are provided with fast
boats to catch rum-runners, but with
the introductionuof airplanes in liq.
uor traffic there must be a flying
police department. It will not re-
place the other departments but will
just become another law enforcement
unit which will be practical not
only in prohibition enforcement, but
in long chases of bandits. With the
criminals running riot as they 'seem
to be, faster methods of catching them1
are a necessity and the airplane ise
the logical means.t
The law seems always to be a bit
behind the criminals, but before long
it will catch up with the introduc-
tion of flying divisions of the policet
departments throughout the world.(

Music And Drama
"MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING"
A Review; by Stratton Buck
Of course a more pleasant and
more kindly thing in this last review
of the season would be to say farewell
to the Rockford Players in one final
and unqualified bouquet. They have
given us an enjoyable summer of plays,
and are leaving us Saturday, if we
may believe Mr. Henderson, never to
return. Which gives me an even
greater desire to pay a final tribute.
Unfortunately this cannot be. "Much
Ado About Nothing" does not justify
unqualified praise. By this I do mean
that the show does not contain much
that is admirable, but on the other
hand there is also much in the piece
that is difficult to reconcile with its
better parts.
First of all let me repeat my oft
stated dictum that the players are a
most capable group of actors.. Noth-
ing in the current performance would
lead one to question this. The prin-
cipal defects in the production of this
comedy must be laid to the score of
the direction. The individual actors
do their valiant best with the material
given them, but thetplay has beenj
'most injudiciously cut.1
The raucous, nerve racking, off stage
laughter, much of which was wisely
omitted in the period performance,
did nothing to help straighten th
piece out, nor was the music that
continued well Into the first act of any
use other than to add to the general
confusion.
Secondly there was a certain rag-
gedness and lack of finish about the
production that gave the spectator
a feeling of insecurity, and a fear
that something was about to slip.
Thirdly, and this is difficult to par-
don, the majority of the actors found
it impossible to make themselves un-
derstood. E. Martin Browne was the
great offender in this respect, with
Lillian Bronson, George Johnson and
Roman Bohnen only slightly less ob-
scure. But even the usually Impec-
cable Miss Kelly offended at times,
and only four of the cast were en-
tirely guiltless of faulty enuncia-
tion.
One more complaint, and I will
pass to more favorable remarks. This
last deals with the total inappropri-
ateness of bringing Dogberry into the
dance at the conclusion of the play.
This is no criticism of Mr. Hender-
son's acting of the part. He was
funny, uproariously funnytas the con-
stable. By the second night he had
learned his lines, and thus did away
with the "ad libing" which detract-
ed from his first performance. Dog-
berry, as played by Henderson is a
most amusing character. But he
does not belong in the finale. But
now to more favorable topics.
We may as well start with Elberta
Trowbridge, whose Hero was per-
haps the best impersonation of the
evening. Mrs. Trowbridge brought
to this role the ingenue charm of a
delightful but not at all unusual
young noblewoman. She does this
in a finished and convincing manner
that makes Hero one of the most
satisfying persons of the piece.
Though Beatrice is not her best
role of the season; Miss Kelly dis-
plays many of the qualities that have
won her so much applause all sum-'
ner. Here, as in everything else she

s the most striking personality on
the stage, and. absolutely dominates
he scene the entire time she is be-
ore the audience.
Best among the male roles was
toman Bohnen's Benedick, which was
xcellently worked out and excellent-
y acted. Bohnen's tendency to swal-
ow the last words of his speeches
was unfortunate. The two guest
artists William Youngs and Henry
Clein, as Claudio and Don Pedro,
eft nothing to be desired. Samuel
lonell was excellent as ;Don Anthony,
ar better indeed than I have ever
een him. Except for his drunken
cene, which did not carry conviktion,
Elton Buck made. a forceful and vig-
rous Borachio, while Lillian Bron-
on, had she not pronounced so in-
istinctly, would have completed a
eason of splendid impersonations
!ith her Margaret.
The less said about Messers Browne
.d Johnson the better. Neither
ould be understood, the former was
.opelessly wooden, and the latter
verdid his clowning badly.
In conclusion the play as given is
ood entertainment, .better I felt in
*stume that in modern dress. The
et is admirably conceived, and this
s as good a time as any to say that
he scenery has been splendid all
eason. The program tells us that
young man named Elton Buck has
pen responsible for this.

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Editorial Comment

I

A "BIRD'S EYE VIEW" JUDGMENT
Thirteen young Englishmen, unoffi-
cial representatives of the colleges of
Oxford university, now on a tour of
the American universities in the East,
expressed extreme surprise at the
amount of money "thrown around in
this country," especially as evidenced
in new buildings for educational in-
stitutions, as they chatted in Boston
3 after a visit to the campuses of Har-
vard and Yale universities.
Their trip is being promoted in or-
der that the Oxford students may
have an opportunity of viewing first-
hand, the various educational systems
of representative universities in the
United States and Canada, .,and to
"get a bird's eye view of the United
States and Canada," as one member
of the party expressed it.
And in that last expression they
gave away the reason that they have
concluded that we are throwing
money around the country-they are
getting a bird's eye view of the uni-
versities, and have not come close
enough to the actual workings of the
colleges, or of the financial circum-
stances of the country to understand
that large expenditures of money on
our educational institutions are fully
warranted.
If a country has a large amount
of money, there is probably no better
way for it to. spend it than: ;for edu-
cation.-;
--The Daily - lilini.

222 S. Main

Phonn 4191

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