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August 04, 1928 - Image 1

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Michigan Daily, 1928-08-04

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WEATHER
Unsettled and continued

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MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

VOI. IX, No. 36.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, AUGUST 4, 1928

PRICE FIVE CENTS

3
F'

POLISH FLYERS NOTI
SIGHTED AT AZORES
ON TRIP TO AMERICA
SITUATION CAUSES NO ALARM ON
HORTA ISLAND OF
FAYAL
WEATHER REMAINS GOOD
Flyers Leave Le Bourget Thursday
Night, Ann Arbor Time, And
Hope To Land Today
BULLETIN
(By Associated Press)k

GAINS POSITION
HIGH IN CHURCH

UALIZATION E EOR SH
SAYS GOVERNOR SMITH

7'

IANY EXHIBITS SHOWN AT OPEN
HOUSE OF BIOLOGICAL STATION

NOMINEE DISAPPROVES

OF PLANI

HORTA ISLAND OF FAYAL,'
Azores, August 3.-At 10:00 o'clockl
the "Marshall Pilsudski," Polish fly-!
er's trans-Atlantic plane, had not
been sighted here. It had Peen caU
culated that if it passed over 'the
Azores on its trip from Paris to New'
York it would arrive here between 7;
and 9 p. m. Azores time, (4 to 6 p. m.
Eastern Standard time).
Failure to ,sight the plane, however,
caused no apprehension here because
it was understood that unless fuel
was running low the flyers intended
keeping a course to the north of this
Archipelago.
A forced landing in the Azores
would be safe only on the Island of
Perteira although it would be possi-
ble on, some of the agricultural fields
in Fayal.;

Dr. Cosmo Gordon/4ang
Who is the new archbishop of Can-'
terbury. He succeeds Dr. Randall
thomas Davidson who recently re-
signed as head of the Church of Eng-
land.
NATIONAL G UARDSMEN4
LEAVE FORGALN
Two Local Companies Will Arrive In
Northern Camp For Training
Early This Morning
YPSI SIGNAL CORPS 00ES

OF MCNARY-HAUGEN
FARM BILL
TO CONFER WITH WALSH
Recognizes Obligation To Control
Salei Of Agricultural Surpluses,
But Seeks Other Methods
(By Associated Press)
NEW YORK, August 3.-The equali-
zation provision of the vetoed Mc-
Nary-Haugen Farm Relief bill is un-
acceptable to Governor Smith, and so
far as he is concerned relegated to
the scrap heap for good.
The Democratic Presidential nom-
inee recognizes and feels that his
party by its platform is committed to
control of the sale of agricultural
surpluses which are to be borne by
the group benefited, but his thumb
was turned down on the McNary-
Haugen method.
Facing a dozen or more enquiring
newspapermen today in his suite at
the Biltmore, which was not cool
even if it is on the 14th floor where
there usually is a breeze, Smith went
further on the farm question than he
did yesterday after talking things
over with George N. Peek, Illinois
farm leader who has cast his lot with
the Democrats.
Yesterday's Statement Recalled
Someone recalled Smith to his
statement of yesterday-"Control of
the sale of agricultural surplus is
recognized by our platform as an es-
sential measure, its cost to be im-
posed on the unit to be benefited"-
and asked whether that was to be
construed as an endorsement of the
equalization fee principle.
Smith quickly turned to an editor-
ial in the New York World declaring
that it summed up his views con-
cisely. It is said that the plan for
accepting the cost of controlling sur-
pluses contained in the legislation
which President branded as uncon-
stitutional was unacceptable to him;
that Smith had no plan of his own
as yet for carrying out the principles
of having the unit aided stand the
expense and that if elected he had
promised to get down to work on
evolving a satisfactory method.
Dismisses Question
That was all the nominee would
say about the question dismissing it
to disclose that he had invited Sen-
ator Walsh of Montana to confer with
him soon. He said Mr. Walsh had
expressed a willingness to meet with
him, but that a definite date and
place for the conference had not been
determined.

Fifty exhibits demonstrating re-
search and class work at the Uni-
versity Biological station at Douglas
lake were on display at its second
annual visitors' day held the first of
this week. More than 550 people at-
tended the exhibition, according to
word received by Dean Edward H.
Kraus from Prof. George LaRue, di-
rector of the camp.
One of the most extensive exhibits
was that dealing with parasites and
parasitic diseases, including 'edge
pool itch, parasitic worms, and beach
insects. Perhaps the most economi-
cally important aspect of the research
conducted at the camp, according to
Professor LaRue, is the investigation
of fish and fish di'seases in which all
of the students are engaged.
Research in the field of vertebrates
was represented by a series of photo-
graphs showing the life histories of
CODOLIDGE EROCE
CONGREISS FOR DEF[ICIT
Blames Legislators For Overriding
His Veto And Causing Large Loss
In Postal Department 3
MAIL RATES MAY 00 UP

the night hawk, sand piper, wood pe-
wee, and cedar waxwing, and by a
miniature bird blind with dolls as
observer's.,
The entomologists showed a num-
ber of drawings of dragon flies and'
other large insects, as well as re-
sults of investigation o fthe minute
inhabitants of the lake, and particu-
larly of the respiration of aquatic
snails, while the frog pens used in
evaluating frogs; as fly catchers were
also a center of interest. A weed ex-
hibit was of value to the farmers in
attendance.
The visitors' day was in the nature
of an open house, and all the facili-
ties of the station were open to in-
spection, such a's the library, the
stockroom, "Log Lab," the oldest
building on the site, the hospital (con-,
ducted under the supervision of the
University Health Service), and the
camp store.
The Biological station was estab-
lished in 1909 and is at present the
largest inland establi'shment of its
kind in the world. Its purpose is
primarily to study plants and ani-
mals out-of-doors. Each year ten or,
more scientific articles describing the
results of its researches are publish-
ed.
HOOVER COMPLETES,
ACCEPTANCE SPEECH,
Confers With Party Leaders After
His Arrival At Stanford
From Vacation
CEREMONIES IN ONE WEEK
-i--
(By Associated P. ss)
STANFORD UNIVERSITY, August

OLYMPIC STANDINGS
(By A'ssociated Press)
United States ..............142
Finland...................64
Great Britain............ . .40
Sweden ...................37
Germany....................34
Canada ......................33
Japan ........................15
South Africa. ................14
eFrance....................10
Ireland .....................10
Norway ..................7
Hungary ......................5
Haiti.....................5
Italy.....................4
Philippines................
( Switzerland................1
Holland...................1

BARBUTI TAKES DASH,
TITLE AND RETRIE YES
SYRACUSE ATHLETE WINS 40
METER DASH FOR ONLY
SPTNT TITLE
RITOLA WINS FROM NURMI
American Supporters Go Wild After
Five Days Of Disheartening
Reverses As Race Ends

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At nightfall tonight the sky was
overcast and there was no wind.
(By Associated Press)
LE BOURGET, France, August 3.--
Two Polish knights of the air sped
westward with the dawn tod4y hop-
ing to make the first non-stop east
to west flight to New York from
France.
Majors Louis Idzikowski and Ka-
zimir Kubala of the Polish air serv-
ice hopped off at 5:46 a. m. (Paris
daylight time, 11:46 p. m. Thursday,
eastern standard time) in their plane
christened Marszalek . Pilsudski in
honor of the Polish dictator.
The hopes of the airmen were highj
although the barometer was low.
They went against the advice of the
French weather service but were
confdent in word from America that
they would run into good conditions
on that side of the Atlantic.
Expect To Land Today
The flyers expected to land at New
York Saturday afternoon after a
flight of from 3,000 to 4,000 miles, de-
pending on the route followed. A
strong northeasterly breeze wafted
them on their course which led south-
west over the Azores.
The plane passed over Dreux, about
50 miles from Le Bourget, at 6:38 a.
m. It was flying westward at a
height of 1,500 feet and at good speed.
Idzikowski, wearing a leather coat
over street clothes, climbed into the
plane first. He took the pilot's seat.
Kubala, in' light dungarees, took the
navigator's post behind. One slight
incident delayed the start when an
oil reservoir filled too full and over-
flowed, drenching the pilot's seat. Six
mechanics rapidly sponged off the big
plane as if it were a racehorse before
a great test.
Leaves Ground Slowly
Kubala was cool and practical to
the last minute. Idzikowski, who
had the task of taking off with an
eight-ton Sesqui plane with a single
650-horse power motor, was very
white in the face as he pulled down
his goggles and hunched over the con-
trols.
With the motor roaring and spitting
red and blue flames, the flyers gave
a last wave of their hands and start-
ed the plane trunding down the field
accompanied by cries of encourage-
ment. As the engine got up speed
and began to bound over the uneven
field it seemed that the plane would
nev'er rise from the ground with its
heavy load.
After tlle airmen hopped off, later
weather reports were received. While
they were not too favorgble they of-
fered at least more chances of suc-
cess than any conditions which pre-
vailed recently.

Ann Arbor's national guardsmen
left last night for Camp Grayling,
where they will have their fifteen day
training period. They assembled at
the Armory at 1:00 o'clock yesterday
and marched to the Michigan kCen-%
tral station where they boarded the
train about 8 :00 p. m.
The line of march was from the
Armory north on Fourth street to
Detroit street, turning on Fuller to
Carey. Special coaches were provid-
ed on the train for the local contin-
gent. The Ypsilanti signal corps
company left for camp on the same
train. They are expected to arrive
at camp about 8 o'clock this morning.
Minor details received attention
yesterday afternmon and the heavier
Ibaggage was transported to the sta-
tion by truck. Musical instuments
and sporting equipment was included
in the property of the outfits for en-
tertainment during recreational hours.
The usual rivalry is expected be-
tween Companies I and K at camp
this year. Contests in being first
to have tents erected and other army
detail work exists as keenly between
the local organizations as it does
among the companies of various cities
of the state.

SUPERIOR, Wisconsin, August $.
President Coolidge feels that Con-
gress, by having overridden his
vetoes on bills increasing postal ex-
penditures, is largely responsible not
only for the estimated one hundred
million dollar deficit in the post office
department for the fiscal year of 1929'
but also for any increase in postal
rates which may have to be imposed to
balance the departmental budget.
Mr. Coolidge understands that some3
postal rates may have to be raised
since the law makes it mandatory up-
on the Postmaster General to alter

(By Associated Press)
OLYMPIC STADIUM, Amsterdam,
August 3-Ray Barbuti, the ironheart-
ed stoutlegged son of little old New
York and Syracuse saved America
from rout on the Olympic track this
afternoon by winning, in a manner
sensationally dramatic the 400 meter
filnal. It waA- only by a margin of 8
inches.
Not even the day when Paavo Nur-
mi suffered his first Olympic defeat
since 1920, making a virtual gift of
the 5000 meter final to his country-
man, Willie Ritola, could deprive the

3.-Herbert Hoover had" unburdened.
himself tonight of the long and ardu-
ous task of preparing the address
which he Is to deliver here a week

i

,j

the rates of certain services to ac- from tomorrow formally acr ting Americans of tfie glory they had been
tually assure sufficient income to bal- the Republican nomination for Presi- looking for in vain during five prev-
ance the expenditures they involve.- dent. ions days of track and field champ-
The completed draft of the address, ionships. Yankee, backs were to the
which makes about six thousand wall as far as foot racing was con-
words or five full columns of news- cerned. They had seen their sprint-
paper type was sent back to the print- ers and middle distance men not on-
er late in the day after the nominee ly beaten, but beaten badly. This 440
bad labored all day with it. assisted meter race was the sole remaining
at times by William J. Donavan, as-! chance to pull an individual flat rate
(By Associated Press) sistant to the United States Attorney victory out of the fire, so it' wasn't
(UBLI Assad Pess) .General and foremost on Hoover's surprising that all eyes at the start
HUBIN, I anddustM3.-aoncouncil of advisers, were on Phillips and Barbuti, or that
Huenefeld, Captain Kehl and Major In this address, to be delivered in the Yankees made the welkin ring
Fitzmaurice, the crew of the airplane the Stanford stadium one week from when their burly favorite came
thremenAplan, anotrdfigt actrs Saturday, he will present his views through.
the Atlantic, according to an Inter-:
view with the Associated Press by on the two now most discussed issues ,arbuti's time was 47 4-5 seconds,
of the campaign, prohibition and farm which is within 1-5 ^second of the
The Irish airman declared, in ad- relief, and mention other issues which Olympic record. Henry Phillips of
dition that he and the Germans are he believes must have their weight the United States was sixth.
agreed to make another long flight n the scales by which the voters will Although Phillips brought the Unit-
measure the candimlates on November e ttsoepith iihdls
with .a bigger machine equipped with 6. ed States one point he finished last
as the field numbered but six. He.
mOthr econd flight, he said, they Leaders Watch Closely weakened somewhat after setting a
planned to keep a log with a view As important as Hoover's pro- killing race.
of collecting data for the future de- nouncements may be upon these sub- Americans Go Wild
velopment of transatlantic aviation jects, astute political observers will The American contingent, which has
on commercial lines. study his address for something been sitting gloomily for five days,
"All that is required to make the more, for those things which will re- went wild as the big ex-Syracu'san
Newfoundland-Ireland route abso- flect his personality and disclose to won this event for America for the
lutely practical," Fitzmaurice said, "the nation his philosophy of govern- first time since 1912. Picked up after
"is to set up a proper study of weather ment. Since this is Hoover's first his great finish, Barbuti staggered
conditions over the north Atlantic." adventure upon the highway to elec- drunkenly for a few moments but re
tive office, leaders of his party frankly vived quickly enough to respond to
BASEBALL SCORES say that these things will be of high cheers andog off the field
importance.
The order of finish in this great

ENGLAND'S POOR AND MIDDLE CLASSES
WORK FOR ANGLO-AMERICAN A M I T Y

(By Associated Press)
LONDON, Aug. 3.-The prospect of
permanent Anglo-American friend-
ship was shown by recent observa-
tions here to rest chiefly on the high
regard for American civilization al-
most universally displayed by Eng-
land's poor and middle classes.
While the English-Speaking Union
and a dozen other organizations con-
tinue their steady and useful work of
interpreting England to America and
America to England, the unmoneyed
groups in England need little stim-
ulus to unite them in friendship to-
ward the United States.
Whatever criticism one hears of
America in England comes usually
from the upper classes, even though'
the same classes initiate the move-
ment for better Anglo-American rela-
tions. The sly sneer or quip at the
American accent, American tourists,
American prosperity and American
movies generally comes from the
British Intelligentsia.
The ordinary people of England be-
ginning with the cockney and ex-
tending to the shopkeeper, are decid-
edly pro-American. They have heard
tales of--the democratic spirit to the
west. Herbert Hoover the mine boy
and Al Smith the fish-hawker, rise to
be candidates for the presidency.
president's daughter.

The cockney is more amenable to
American influence exerted through
the movie, the phonograph and the
jazz song than is the aristocrat, for
his diversions are much more confin-
ed. He does not see so many plays,
does not travel, reads very little. His
amusements are American movies and
American music, whether phono-
graphic or script, to which he dances.
It is indicative of this influence that
so many American slang words are
found in the cockney patois. Guy
bird, flop, skirt, and a host of others
have been imported from America
via the movie and the phonograph,
for cockney consumption. The cock-
ney leaves off the "g" in "ing" words,
overworks "ain't" and smooths over
his "t's" into "d's." The aristocrat
does none of these things.
It has been the writer's privilege
to make a series of talks to clubs and
societies of toe poorer sections of
London. The reception given by the
cockney people was uniformly cor-
dial. The talks were all of America,
and I was assured that the attendance
was larger than usual. Judging from
the questions which followed these
talks, these working-class are keenly
interested in the republic in the west,
and their questions evinced a knowl-
edge of America which was some-
times startling,

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(By Associated Press)
American League
Washington 9, Detroit 3.
Boston 3, Chicago 1.
Cleveland 9, Philadelphia 5.f
St. Louis 8, New York 0.
National League
New York 7, Cincinnati 5.
St. Louis 5, Boston 1.
Chicago 8, Brooklyn 5.
Pittsburgh 14, Philadelphia 6.
SEND OUT BLANKS
FOR GAME SEATS
Football ticket application blanks
will be mailed to all alumni of the
University of Michigan and to all cit-
izens of the state of Michigan who
have requested such applications on
August 6, according to Director
Fieldine H. Yost.

ome . assert tney will ioom evenj
larger in the public mind than the
treatment of the subjects which have
lashed the political campaigns.
Whether the Republican nominee
shares this view is a question as yet
unanswered publicly, but some indi-
cation is furnished by the fact that
he has insisted upon preparing the
address word by word in his own
language and his own literary style.
Before getting down to his work
after his arrival home Thursday,
Hoover conferred with two party
leaders, Dante Pierce of Des Moines,
Ia., publisher of farm"weeklies, and
Nathan William MacChesney of Chi-
cago, who has been charged with the
duty of perfecting state and county
organizations in all states west of
Ohio under the direction of James W.
Good of Iowa, western manager in
the Republican campaign organiza-
tion.

race was Barbuti, U. S., Ball,'Canada~
Buchner, Germany, Rinkel, Britain,
Storz, Germany, and Phillips, U S.
The Olympic record which Barbuti
Just fell short of equalling, was 47
3-5, set by Eric Liddell of Great Prit-
ain in Paris in 1924
Syracuse Repeats
Strangely enough the last American
to win the classic 400 at the Olym-
pics was a product of the same New
York state institution, Syracuse uni-
ver'sity. Charley Reidpath won at
Stockholm in 1912. Since then the
championship has gone to South Af-
rica and Great Britain.
Willie Ritola of Finland, won the
5,000 meter running championship.
Two young Americans, Leo Lermond,
and Macauley Smith, were beaten after
a game attempt to stay with the
flying Finns, Ritola and Nurmi, who
jockeved. setting the nace all the way.

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