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August 03, 1928 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1928-08-03

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PAGE TWO

THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, AUGUST 3, 1928

THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY, AUGUST 3, 1928
_______ I I____

a UiIt wan ea
Published every morning except Monday dur-
ing the University Summer Session by the
Board in Conto of Student Publications.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news
published herein.
Entered at the Ann Arbor, Michigan, post-
office as second class matter.
Subscription by carrier, $x.so; by mail, $i.75".
Offices: Press Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 49M
MANAGING EDITOR
J. STEWART HOOKER
Editorial Directors.......George E. Simons
Martin Mol
CityEditor...............Lawrence R. Klein
Feature Editor.............Eleanor Scribner
Mus~ic iad Drama Editor...... Stratton Buck
Beaks Tditors......Kenneth G. Patrick
Kathryn Sayre
NightEditors

Alex Bochnowski
Robert Dockeray
_Howard Shout

Martin Mol,
George Simon
Clarence Edelson

Reporters

Magaret Zahm
1. Isbl-Charles

Robert O'Brien

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21914
BUSINESS MANAGER
RAY WACHTER
Advertising..............Lawrence Walkley
Advertising...............Jeannette Dale
Accounts................Whitney Manning
Circulation...........Besie V. Egelad
Assistants
Samuel LukensJaetsLogis Lillian Korvinsky
Janet Logic
FRIDAY, AUGUST 3, 1928
Night Editor-GEORGE E. SIMONS
THE CHORAL UNION SERIES
Ten Brilliant programs have been
arranged for next year's Choral Union
Cencert series on which many of the
world's most famous artists will ap-
pear. Among them will be Fritz
Kreisler, the king of violinists, Am-
elita Calli-Curci, recognized through-
out the world as the predominant ex-
ponent of colorature singing, Sergei
Rachmaninoff, the pianist andco-
poser, the Detroit Symphony orches-
tra, and several other stars and mu-
sical organizations.
This year's program will celebrate
the fiftieth consecutive season of high
class concerts sponsored by the
Choral Union; it will mark the close
of a half a century of continued effort
to give to students of the University
and citizens of the state the best that
can be obtained in musical entertain-
ment. But it is not only a desire to
provide the finest possible entertain-
ment that has been the motive for the
unceasing endeavor. It is the as-
piration of that organization to de-
velop in people a taste for classical
music, the best that has been written.
It has been its aim to foster a cul-
ture based on the development of the
artistic senses.
The Choral, Union will not fall into
inactivity after fifty years effort, but
it will go on expending ever-increas-
ing energy to carry out a program of
musical activity. It is an organiza-
tion whose aims can hardly be over-
rated, for by its presentation of
artistic programs it is helping to de-
velop a truly cultured and refined
race of people.
NEED FOR FUNDS
It is unfortunate that the state de-
partment of agriculture is facing
what might turn out to be a possible
shortage of funds in that branch of.
its activity that works for the eradi-
cation of cattle contaminated with
tuberculosis. Surely this phase of the
work has been a tremendous contri-
bution to the health of Michigan, and
every legitimate effort should be put
forth in an endeavor to secure avail-E
able funds to carry on this work to1
its fullest extent.-
Although it may appear that the
expendtiure of $96,577.70, which isr
the amount expended since the first
of the year in paying for idemnities1
for unhealthy cattle slaughtered, is a
rather large sum to appropriate fora
this cause, the returns on the invest-e
ment in this direction are immeasur- i
able. Ever since this work of eradi- t
cation of tubercular cattle was start- a
ed in Michigan the spread of the germ i
has been checked to a great extent. s
With the state using such precuation- a
ary means to guarantee to the milk e
consumers, and practically every cit- n
izen can be included in this class, the t
contraction of disease from this t
source is cut to a minimum. G
Experts have discovered that milk t
from a tubercular cow is liable to w
cost the lives of a number of ndi-f

viduals. In past investigations many n
cases of tuberculosis have been r
traced to the source of the milk sup-
ply. Now for the department of agri-
culture to be faced with a possible h
shortage of funds, the report having re
been given out that only $15,922 is tb
Still available for use in this work si

for the next eleven months, is a sit-
uation over which state authorities
should ponder and endeavor to find
some means whereby a transfer of
funds could be arranged to provide
for the necessary appropriation.
COLLEGIATE LITERATURE
The word "Collegiate," as it is
popularly used, and the shortcomings
of "collegiate" movies have been dis-
cussed rather thoroughly in recent
editorials, but the type of writing
which may be termed "collegiate lit-
erature" has been left out of consid-
eration.
The word collegiate seems to have
assumed a derogatory meaning that
boarders on the ridiculous. It is not
only always applied to the frivolities
of college youth, but to things which
have absolutely no connection with
college life. "Collegiate" movies
depict an exaggerated social life,
while totally disregarding the serious
effort that is expended in class rooms
and laboratories in the persuit of
higher education.
"Collegiate" literature is exactly as
inaccurate as the movies which are
advertised as startling pictures of
college life. Such pictures are usual-
ly more startling to college students
than to the general public because
most of the stories written for the
public about college strengthen the
belief that college life is a grand
drunk with a few necking parties
thrown in between drinks.
Stories as well as movies only pre-
sent one side of the actual circum-
stances. They deal only with what
little sensational material may be
found and do not include anything
about the work that must be done if
there isi to be any college life. There
are comparatively few opportunities
to do the things which are so care-
fully pictured in stories while one is
taking the required amount of work,
but how can the public which knows
college only through reading have a
true conception of the actual serious-
ness of It all when they are not given
the whole truth? This is exactly the
point, it cannot, nor can it have until
someone succeeds in presenting the
facts in an interesting way.
Magazines which are supposedly in-
terested in college and college stu-
dents could do a great deal toward
correcting a wrong impression if they
would arrange to publish facts pre-
sented in a readable way. There is
an abundance of truths interesting in
themselves which, if untainted by the
writer's imagination, would form a
basis for accurate stories that would
do much in the right direction. Let
us hope that someone will soon take
advantage of an opportunity to tell
the truth about a subject of interest
to a great mass of people.
TUNNEY RETIRES?
Following a career of ten years in
pugilistic activity, Gene Tunney,
heavyweight boxing champion of the
world, has announced his retirement
from the ring. This announcement
comes as a great surprise to the
sporting world, but the action taken
by the fighter should draw nothing
but the highest praise.
Unlike many of our former boxing
champions, Gene Tunney was never
considered as a pugilist in the sense
of being a real "rough and tumble"
fighter. His skill in) sparring and his
ability as a scientific fighter greaitly
outshone his ability as a sheer mal-
er, although it is true that he di-

played a remarkable demonstration
of the latter in his last three fights.
Whenever he fought he. was in dead'
earnest and gave the best that he
had. As a ring generail he was in a
class by himself and never has a
question been raised dis to his fair-
ness in a fight.
When Tunney came, into the cham-
pionship the world tw a new type
of professional figliter. His brawn
and muscle, were ideally supplement-
ed by arkeen Intellect. His interest
in the arts and in the best of litera-
ure is an interestseldom found in
world champion boxer. His activity
n the ring and his educational pu r-
uits out of the ring, coupled with the
dmirable meethods which' he employ-
d to keep himself fit have been tlie
ieans of elevating t7ie standards W/
he boxing professio n. It is hoped!
hat the splendid e7.ample as set by
'ene Tunney will be an inspiration.
o those who now, and in the future:
ill, look forwar'd to a career of pro--.
essional boxifig, f 'roviding that Tun--.
ey is sincere in Ihis statement about.,
etiring. ''
Now that so makny foreign nations,
ave signed the Kelogg treaty for the
enunciation of wetar wd can expect
bat dotted lines ior Uncle Sam's;
inature willm ntrmn..

OASTEDROLL
ROLLSR
BUREAU
AT WORK
Of late, numerous communications
of considerable importance have come
to the attention of the Rolls Welfare
Bureau, most of them being from
teachers enrolled in summer school.
And while it is not the intentions
of the bureau to make known the sub-
stance of the individual communica-
tions in this column, several of the
more pertinent queries will be an-
swered this morning.
* * *
First of all we have the lady (bles's
her heart) who states that she lost
a hairpin last week on the campus,
and would like to have the Rolls
Wekfare Bureaue assist her in find-
ing it. Lady, we suggest that you look
no further than the New Museum.
No doubt it was picked up on the
campus and donated to that institu-
tion as a relic of the civilized age.
* * *
WHAT IS COLLEGE
And then there is the young male
teacher (the one with glasses) who
writes to us wishing to know just
what the Rolls definition of college
would be. There's a sticker.
* s
Well, sir, President Burton used to
say that college is a place where a
young man has a fine opportunity to
belong to a good fraternity and await
the real opportunities which will be
provided him by his ancetors. Rolls
considers that too aristocratic.
* s -
ROLLS DEFINITION OF COLLEGE
However, It Is the Rolls Bureau
own definition you were seeking sir,
and so It shall be. Rolls would de-
fine college as a human hothouse
speclalizing in the sheltered rearing
of persons who would be otherwise
normal If they were left alone. So
much for George Jean Nathan.
* *
dd, oh yes, to get more up to
date, we were highly gratified this
morning to receive our1 first commun-
ication from Sweet Sue since the
timely departure of Lark. Sweet Sue
wants to know what we think of co-
eds in general and what our defini-
tion would be, if asked.
* * C
SPEAKING OF CO-EDS
Well, Sue, you brought it upon
yourself by asking. We believe
( that a co-ed Is a young woman
who Is really looking for an edu- f
eation-or else she wouldn't
spend so much time with the
boy friend.
Now, Sue, don't feel hurt. There
was nothing personal in that state-
ment, and besides, we can enlarge
upon it. In the first place, there is
considerable difference between a co-
ed and an ordinary woman. When an
ordinary woman says. "Stop" she
means it.
M *
If you are still with us, Sue, we
would further explain our 'stand by
stating that a coed is the sort of a
girl, who, when it rains, doesn't try
to interfere. Does that clear the mat-
ter up?

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* * s

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And then there is the com.
municatlon from the very mas.
culine teacher (virile, of course)
who wants to know how to be
collegiate. His is a sad case.

{
I

:_._.

* t *
HOW TO BE COLIEGIATE
Weil, for anyone who asks such
a foollesh question, Rolls will do hi's
best. fu the first place, you mu.t be
able to recognize the potentialities
of pretzels. That always puts you
over.
* * S
And then again, you must know how
to act in front of strange things that
you will observe from time to time
promenading along the diagonal with
a pick and shovel in hand. In time
.you will be able to detect a gold-dig-
ger even when she has left her pick
and shovel at home.
* * *
And finally, you must learn how to
keep your hair dry on a wet day with-
out wearing a hat; how to keep your
socks up without wearing garters;
and lastly, how to keep from going
to sleep in Wenley's lectures.
* * S
When you have accomplished all
of these, then you are collegiate.
-An...-m

.I

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