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August 03, 1928 - Image 1

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Michigan Daily, 1928-08-03

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WEATHER
Unsettled and continued
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MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

VOL. IX. No. 35. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, AUGUST 3, 1928 PRICE FIVE CENTS

RELIGION AND SCIENCE
BOT 'EEK THE TRUTH,
DECLARESDR, LITTLE
BRANDS DOGMATISM AS BEINGI
HINDRANCE TO PROGRESS
IN RELIGION
MATERIALISM IS REBUKED1
President Speaks Under Auspices O
S. C. A. To Record Summer
Audience Of 2,00
"True science and true religion have
one great characteristic in common -
tiy are both hunting the truth. Their
purpose should be to maintain at all
cots a love of the truth and a fear-
lessness on the part of each individual
In advocating the portion of it that
he sees," declared President Clarence
Cook Little in his lecture on "Science
and Religion" yesterday afternoon in
Hill auditorium. "There is no place
in a modern community for dogma-
tism in either science or religion."
Characterizing materialism as the
dogmatism of science, the essence of
our modern 'booster' philosophy which
tries to satisfy our sense of owner-
ship by telling us we understand ev-
erything in the world and beyond,
President Little pointed out that its
chief advantage, that of being strictly
logical, is exactly the thing that un-
fits it for judgment of religion. "Logic
in religion has no value," he said. "It
is simply a limited and a man-creat-
ed tool.
Materialism Makes Mistake
"Materialism," he continued, "makes
its great mistake when it ignores the
whole set of phenomena connected
with the relationship of higher forms
of organized matter to lower forms.
The amoeba, the lowest form of lif e,
is able to understand (in a physio-
logical sense) a speck of metal and
its unfitne'ss for food, whereas the me-
tal is not conscious of having been
understood. A sea-urchin, a some-
what higher form of life, can swal-
low an amoeba, can make use of it,
whereas the amoeba has no compre-
hension of how it is being used.
"Similarly, a crow might come along
and eat a sea-urchin; and finally a
farmer might shoot the crow for hav-
ing eaten his corn, and the crow would
fail to see how there could be any
being above it capable of conscious-
ly planning to interfere with Its life.
Experience Is Outside of Person
"In the same way men and women
experience things that they know posi-
tively are outside themselves, things
that they feel, keenly but cannot quite
understand, such as the love of na-
ture or of other human beings or of
art. It is when it tries to dear with
these things that are spiritual and
not logical that science i so extreme-
ly pathetic.
"Scientific truth is easily transfer-
red from one mind to another, but
religious truth is very hard to com-
municate. One of even the twelve
chosen disciples failed dismally to
comprehend Jesus' teaching. As a
matter of fact, what we are doing
now when we think we are transmit-
ting spiritual truths is simply making
people sign on the dotted line, so to
speak, making them go through the
form of religious behavior. Modern

religious dogmatism, with its refusal
to accept the simple fact of unfold-
ment of life which is all that evolution
means, its large and juicy budgets,
and its inner system of merits and
award', is not real, not genuine, and
happily for the world our young, peo-
ple know it," he concluded.
REPORT IS M A D E
ON ENROLLM ENT
FMnal enrollment figures for the
summer session, released yesterday,
show a decrease in total enrollment
from last year of 150. This year's
registration is 3,661, while last sum-
mer 3,811 enrolled.
There has been a slight increase
over the figures given out earlier in
the summer in the total enrollment'
due the fact that several have en-
rolled for short courses in the Law;

IS
OF

Gurney L. Newlin
Who was recently elected to the
presidency of the American Bar asso-
ciation by a unanimous vote at the
Seattle convention. Mr. Newlin is
from Los Angeles, Cal.
PUBLIC ACQUAINTANCE
WITH SCHOOLS URGED
Hamtramck Superintendent States
Public Should Be Informed On
School Problems
FAVORS PARENT MEETINGS
"We must differentiate between pub-
licity and public relations," said M.
R. Keyworth, Superintendent of
Schools at Hamtramck, In the lecture,
"Public Relations," delivered before
teachers and administrators at the
University high school yesterday aft-
ernoon.
"Publicity Implies a tendency to
boast, while the term public rela-
tions is broader in scope, and means
an attempt to acquaint the public
with the school system, as it is. Its
purpose is to tell the truth about the
school and the truth should be good
enough, to be told. It is necessary to
have a public relations program be-
cause the school usually gets ahead of
the public and they should be kept
informed,
"The criteria for literature and
other agencies of the program are
truth, brevity, understandable, fre-
quent, and accessible. Above all what
is said must be true. It must be brief
to conserve the time of the public
and presented in a way understand-
able to them.
"As to what agencies in the school
should be used, I would say first, that
all teachers and officers are part of
the program. It should not be used
for the purpose of bringing recogni-
tion to any one administrator or
teacher, but should be a co-operative
effort of all, Teachers have a great
opportunity to further the program
by their attitude when meeting par-
ents, by showing an interest in the
problems and creating a good impres-
PHI DELTA KAPPA
HOLDS INITIATION
Forty graduate students in educa-
tion were initiated into the local
chapter of Phi Delta Kappa, honorary
education fraternity, at 4 o'clock yes-
terday afternoon and entertained at
a banquet last night at the Union.
The principal speaker was Prof.
Frank N. Freeman of the University
of Chicago. His topic was "Can Edu-
cation Increase Intelligence?" The
toastmaster was Prof. William G.
Trow of the educational psychology
department.
A feature of the banquet was the
presentation of service keys in rec-
ognition of seven years membership
in the fraternity to J. Burns Fuller,
Harvey H. Lowrey, Clair K. Searles,
Wray H. Congdon, Merland A. Kopka,
Arold W. Brown, Russell G. Thomas,
and Warren E. Bow.
RANKIN GVES ADDRESS
Professor T. E. Rankin, secretary
of the Summer Session, gave the prin-
cipal address at the final convocation
held yesterday at the Mt. Pleasant

REPUBLICAN NO0M INEE
TURNS TO CAMPAIGN
MATTERS AFTER REST
HOOVER CONFERS ON PLANS!
FOR ORGANIZATION
OF PARTY
BEGINS REVISING SPEECH
Candidate Looks Fit After Five Day
Vacation; Approves Details
Of Organization
(By Associated Press)
STANFORD UNIVERSITY, Califor-
nia, August 2.-Back from his five
day tour in the Northern Mountains,
Herbert Hoover today conferred on
organization and other matters with
callers and then locked himself in
his study overlooking the rolling Uni-
versity Campus devoting himself to
the revision of his speech accepting
the Republican nomination,
The nominee looked unusually fit
after his days and nights in the open,
fishing and motoring, and he attacked
the problem before him with renewed
vigor and an alert mind. He gave his
approval of certain details of organi-
zation in the west and then began
rereading his speech with a view to
shortening it up and having it ready
for distribution next Saturday,
Confers With Pierce
Those with whom he conferred
were Dante Pierce of Des Moines,
Iowa, publisher of weekly farm pub-
lications, and Nathan William 14c-
Chesney of Chicago who personally
managed the Campaign of the late
Major-General Wood in 1920 and who
has been placed in charge of state
and county organization work west
of Pittsburgh under the direction of
James W. Good of Iowa, Western
Manager,
The Hoover countrywide organiza-
tion is to be patterned along the lines
of that formed during the war to
carry forward the Liberty Loan
drives. In this plan is again seen
the directing hand of hoover and his
ability at creating organization under
the management of local leaders.
Besides welding the city, state,
county and precinct units into a co-
hesive working unit, it is proposed
to have the local leaders carry on
extensive speaking campaigns with
short talks for Rotary, Kiwanis and
other civic organizations,

"I think the decisioh of The Sum-
mer Daily to conduct a presidential
poll next week is an excellent move,"
declared Edward H. Kraus, ,Dean of
the Summer Session, in commenting
on the proposed poll yesterday. "It
will serve to stir up interest on the
campus and will show the compara-
tive strength of the presidential
candidates with* those attending the
Summer Session, who did not have
an opportunity to voice their opinion
when the' previous poll was held. The
results should be both interesting and
worthwhile."
The proposed poll to be held on the
campus next Wednesday, and which
is being sponsored by The Summer
ANNOUINCE PLANS -FOR
EXCURSION TOPRSN
Party To Leave In Busses Saturday
Morning For Trip To Jackson;
Wells Is In Cliarte
CHAPLAIN TO BE GUIDE
One of the most interesting excur-
sions being offered this year to sum-
mer school students is the excursion
to Jackson, Michigan and the trip
through the prison there. The jour-
ney is to be made under the direction
of Mr. Carlton F. Wells, director of
excursions and member of the Rhe-
toric department, The party will be
taken to the prison in special busses,
and about two hours will be spent in
making the inspection. State street
in front of Angell Hall has been de-
signated as the starting point, and
the busses are to leave promptly at
eight o'clock Saturday morning,
The Michigan State Prison at Jack-
son is one of the largest in the coun-
try, and was established in 1837. The
tour of the institution will be under
the guidance of Mr. William F. Hopp,
the prison chaplain. Entering through
the visiting room, where the prison-
ers are allowed to talk to their fam-
ilies once a month, the party will be
conducted through a number of the
cell blocks, where the convicts can be
seen in their cells.
Tickets for the excursion will be
sold for $1.25 at Room 8, University
Hall until six o'clock Friday night.

Daily, was also indorsed by Prof. H.
F. Adams, of the psychology depart-
ment, who is well qualified to com-
ment on the outlook for the poll in
view of the fact that many of his
psychological experiments during
the past few years have received
wide recognition.
"The results of The Daily poll
should be interesting in measuring
the relative strength of the presi-
dential candidates," Professor Adams
said. "Such a vote represents a
cross-section of student and faculty
opinion, although its real value de-
pends, of course, on the percentage
of votes cast relative to the total pos-
sible-number of voters."
"As for the actual results," Pro-
fessor Adams concluded, "I should
not be surprised to see the final count
about even between Smith and Hoov-
The poll will be conducted by The
Summer Daily on the campus next
Wednesday, with the ballot boxes
stationed at the designated spots on
the campus open from 9 o'clock until
5 o'clock. The results will be pub-
lished in Thursday morning's issue of
The Daily.
FARM LEADERH WILL
SUPPORT GOV, SMITH!

DEAN KRAUS AND PROFESSOR ADAMS
INDORSE DAILY PRESIDENTIAL P 0 L L

TEAMMATE' SHATTERS
NURMI'S RECORD AS
FINLAND GAINS SCORE
LARVA, FINNISH FLASH, TAKES
FIRST 'LACE IN 1,50
METRE RUN
BAD DAY FOR AMERICANS
Finland, Greece, Germany and Japan
Share Honors In Yesterday's
Olympic Races
I OLYMPIC STANDINGS
(By Associated Press)
United States..........128 1-2
Finland ...................48
Great Britain ................37
Sweden ......................31
I Canada ....................28
Germany .............. .27 1-2
Japan.....................15S
ISouth Africa...............14
France ...... ...............10
IIreland....................10
Norway .... ...............7 '
Hungary .....................5
H aiti ... . ............. ........ 5
Philippines ...................3
Switzerland.......... ... .1
Holland .f............... .1
If

Peek Bolts

Republican

Party ToI

('V .'MPII

"MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING"
IS GIVEN IN PERIOD COSTUME

More Words By Jack Davis
A moment, gentlemen and ladies,
while I make oonsidera.ble ado over
a production which is somewhat more
than nothing, yet a great deal lefss
than such a play should be. Perhaps
it was the heat, or yet the humidity,
or, yet the costumes-or all three to-
gether; but I have never seen the
Rockford Players in such an uneven,
stammering, nervous and generally
blundering performance as that of
"Much Ado About Nothing" last night.
A great deal of the acting was good,
entertaining, funny- what you will.
The stage business of all of the prin-
cipals-except E. Martin Browne -
was frequently clever and 'smooth. The
set is neat and well adapted to its
purposes. The clown scenes-thanks
to the Dogberrying of Bob Henderson,
whose performance was much more
finished last night-were very pleas-
antly droll. But--
The "good" acting came dangerous-
ly near to being overacted. Every-
body from Miss Kelly, down to the
last person mentioned in the program
a's a "servant" tripped or slipped his
cues, or clipped his lines, or rushed
in frienzied on someone yet speaking
The only one who tried to speak the
iambic pentameter lines trippingly on
the tongue, with some care and meas-
ure, was William Young-Claudio -,
and he gave it up anon. Or if that
lacks justice-Samuel Bohnen articu-
lated clearly and so, when not playing
the inebriate, did Elton Buck. This
last one taking the part of Borachio,
acted with commendable vigor and
clarity, but is too much inclined to
conduct himself like a primadonna on
the stage. Experience and seasoning
I am sure, are the best cures for

I have given serious consideration
to the case of E. Martin Browne, and
somewhat haltingly conclude that what
he needs most is a thorough course
in setting-up exercisel. The confi-
dence of the costume seemed to make
his gestures slightly wooden last
night, but his gain in that direction
was cruelly over-balanced by his rush-
ing of cues and standing in front of
other players, and occasionally mouth-
ing his lines.
Roman Bohnen, as Benedick, was, if
you except Dogberry, the most pleas-
ing male in the cast..He did his best
to overcome the deadening pull of
soliloquy, moved up and down the
stage and acted-in contrast to Wil-
liam Young, who, alone, once on the
stage, faced the audience and spgge
his lines beautifully-like a com-
mencement oration.
There is much to be desired about
Mr. Henderson's arrangement of the
play - but that is too late to mend
now. The first part of Act I, scene 1,
e'ssential to introduce the characters,
is cut, to the great confusion of the
udience. It is absurd to plead neces-
sity for the cut on the grounds of
length, for much time is uselessly
wasted in meaningless tableaux at the
beginning and end of the play.
As to the difference between cos-
tume and modern dress: there is much
to be said on both sides; but after
viewing the not unpleasant legs dis-
closed by short skirts on Tuesday
night, and the scrawny male shanks
revealed by doublets and hosen - last
night, I vote earnestly for modern
dress.
Finally, having beefed about the mu-
sic, I must admit that the offering last
night woas a little better. A cello

Cast Lot With SupportersAgt
August 2.-
Of Smith cessor toD
--- meters th
CONFERS W I T H NOMINEE year oldS
spended b
(By Associated Press) "Chester
NEW YORK, August 2-in his fight smashed P
for the Presidency, *Goveinor Smith The las
gained an ally today from the corn-1 Finns den
belt-George N. Peek of Ilinoisone now confli
of the champions of the McNary-Hau- er distan,
the field,
gen farm bill which was frowned on break the
by the Coolidge administration. 1-5 secon
Peek announced that he had bolted better tha
the Republican party to enlist under Co
the Smith banner after he and the Larva's
Democratic nominee had discussed classic in
the farm question for two hours. Ray Cong
Immediately after the conference, finished t
which tools place over a breakfast ta- of the Ol
ble in the Governor's suite in the Bilt- petition.
more, Smith reaffirmed his intentions, Olympic m
if elected, of calling the best minds as the U
in shaping up of a farm relief pro- slimmestr
gram. He mentioned Frank 0. Low- pected to
den, of Illinois, as one of the Repub- shine but
licans he would like to consult. they were
In his statement the Governor re- Germanya
iterated that he would discuss the far- principals
mers problem at length in his ac- Ca
ceptance speech, and observed that The Un
"Control of the sale of agricultural place in
surplus is recognized by our platform Levi Cas
as an essential need, its cost to be the wome
imposed on the unit to be benefited."' ence Mac
tire day's
GIVE LEAGUE TEA pletely in
FOR O R I E N TA L S as the 1,5
trials pro
Oriental men and women students 400 mete
were the guests of honor at a .tea to run an
given by the Women's league yes- ning well
terday in the Women's Field house. Joe Ouer
Dean Edward H. Kraus of the Sum- eliminated
mer Session and Miss Beatrice John- Javelin;
son, advicor of women, were also for the f
present. Refreshments were served young.s
in the form of raspberry ice cream, smashedt
grape punch, wafers, ice cakes, and throw eq
candies. The Field house was dec- inches ans
orated with flowers. six finalis
Thia. tea was the last of the teas Oza won
given by the. Women's League during Japan's f
the summer. Doris Renkenberger with 49 f
was in charge and Helen Ladd was 1924 ha
hostess. The final social affair of Australia,
the League will be the party August
9 in the Field house. PLAY
BASEBALL SCORES AFTE
--- "Much2
(By Associated Press) last play1
Amerlean League ford Play
Detroit 5, Washington 4. season, w
12 innings. inee perfo
St. Louis 4, New York 3, dren ofA
15 innings. this after
Chicago 6, Boston 3. gell hall.
Philadelphia 6, Cleveland 0. in the tra
performa
National League be offere
St. Louis 6, Boston 1. row and
New York 7, Cincinnati 5. evening's
Chicago 3, Brooklyn 2. The seas

(By Associated Press)
IC STADIUM, Amsterdam,
-Finland trotted out a suc-
Nurmi'in the Olympic 1,500
is afternoon, a slim twenty
star, Harry Larva, who re-
by outrunning the French
Jules" Lazoumegud and
Paavo's Olympic record.
test edition of the Flying
nonstrated why Nurmi is
ning his efforts to the long-
ces while galloping around
and passed all rivals to
pace in 3 minutes 53 and
ds, just two fifths seconds
.n Nurmi's 1924 record.
nger Finishes Tenth
victory in this Olympic
which the lone American
er, was badly outrun and
enth, featured the fifth day
ympic track and field com-
One world and two more
records went by the boards
rnited States obtained the
results yet. It was not ex-
be the American's day to
they fared even worse than
figured as Finland, Greece,
and Japan divided the day's
spoils.
sey Takes A Second
ited States had a second
the hop skip and jump by
ey and the sixth place in
n's 800 meter final by Flor-
Donald to show for the en-
scoring, being shutout com-
the javelin throw as well
00 meter final. Preliminary
duced a 50-50 rate in the
r race in Ray Baer failed
d Herman Phillips, was run
and easily qualified, but
ney and Euil Snider were
honors returned to Greece
irst time since 1912 as a
sign-painter, ;Ehlunzuuist,
the Olympic record with a
uivalent to 218 feet 6 1-8
d beat a field in which all
ts surpassed 207 feet. Mikio
the hop skip and jump for
rst Olympic championship
eet 10 13-16 inches as the
mpion, A. W. Winter of
failed even to qualify.
'ERS TO GIVE
RNOON SHOW
Ado About Nothing," the
to be offered by the Rock-
ers during their current
ill be given a special mat-
rmance for the school chil-
Ann Arbor at 3:30 o'clock
noon in Sarah Caswell An-
The comedy will be played
iltional costume. Two more
nces in modern dress are to
d at the matinees of tomor-
Saturday, while Saturday
showing will be in costume.
on closes with the produc-

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