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July 27, 1928 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1928-07-27

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PAGE TWO

THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DATT Y

YT1I-IF ST J M M F M TCT-TTC1 11 . A M fj lT VFR D Y, JU Y 2? 1 2
1 ..a- a * a J .' S .

FRIDAY, JULY 27, 1928

....

Published every morning except Monday dur-
ing the University Summer Session by the
Board in Control of Student Publications.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news
published herein.
Entered at the Ann Arbor, Michigan, post-
office as second class matter.
Subscription by carrier, $1.5o; by mail, $1.75.
Offices: Press Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
J. STEWART HOOKER
Editorial Directors........George E. Simons
Martin Mol
City Editor ............... Lawrence R. Klein
Feature Editor...............Eleanor Scribner
Music and Drama Editor......Stratton Buck
Book~s ditors........... Kenneth G. Patrick
Kathryn Sayre

Alex Bochnow
Robert Docke
Howard Shou

Night Editors
vski
ray
t p Cl
Reporters

Martin Mot
George Simons
arence Edelson
Robert O'Brien

Margaret Zahm
Isabel Charles

R

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
RAY WACHTER
Advertising................Lawrence Walkley
Advertising............... .Jeannette Dale
Accounts.................Whitney Manning
Circulation........ .. .Bessie V. Egelana
Assistants

York Rotary club guarantees to the
courts a jury personnel of capable
men,most of whom are actively en-
gaged in business and who are thus
equipped with a Lnd great-
ly desired for jury . They are
men who will inot sily swayed
by an emotional r 'of a 'smnti-
mental attorney, ill decide the
case on the sheer e of the testi-
mony presented.
i must not 1 i however,
that only men pein to be
members o the u:a9 -.abs or any
other ciubs of ratnve are quali-
fied for jury sE c-. No doulbt many
good jurics ha :: been secured in New
Nork and im other places to sit
through petty cases. But the general
situation as affecting petty juries
shows that men are reluctant to 'serve,
often, times giving many weak ex-
cuses in order to be relieved of this
service.
Serving on a jury is an important
service of an American citizen to his
country. The service should be equal-
ly distributed in order that all may
have ,a chance to show their interest
in the meting out of justice. In the
small localities there is little difficul-
ties in getting citizens to serve, but
in larger cities, such as New York, the
reverse is true.
It is an injustice to the principals
in any trial as well as a hindrance
in the efforts tt. make our courts in-
stitutions of ju Lice if the more capa-
ble citizens o. i city are allowed to
contiinue to use themselves from
jury service d the less desirable
citizens, man f whom are unquali-
fied to rende rn unprejudiced deci-
sion, are m = to occupy the seats
in the jury . In New York par-
ticularly this s been the case. It
has been found', at some of the jury-
men and women selected were total-
ly unqualified to serve although, in
order to expediate the work of the
court, they were place, on the jury
aind their opinions were final.
Although it is not 'tended that
any one organization K: uld mono-
polize the jury box, it is ,ommenda-
ble step that the Rotary : b of the
world's metropolis has t.. in the
direction of assisting in ;inging
about better juries in the Nc York
courts. It would be unfortur, if
this organization stood alone in this
attitude for if undue advantage were
taken of this offer the burden of
serving on juries . co' - t 1 o

Samuel Lukens

Lillian Korvinsky

Janet Logie

OATED ROLL
WE RESIGN
FROM
OFFICEE
The Archbishop of Canterbury has
just resigned from office. We won-
der whom he is supporting for presi-
dent?
* * *
SEVENTH REGULAR PROGRAM
'Rolls' own tea party, given in
galuation to Oscar, Rolls' won-
der horse, will be held in the Ho-
tel Windsor, Canada. Admission
will be free. Arrangements for
the afair will be in the hands of
Rolls, own Women's League, of
which eThe Fair Co-ed is presi-
dent
It is reported that it took 119
judges to fry a case in a French law
court. That probably is the source
for the origin of the phrase "50,000
Frenchmen can't be wrong."
* * *
We were looking through the
old files of The Daily yesterday
and discovered the first Rolls
column ever published. As a
resuit, we have decided that we
are not so bad after all.
* * *
Gene Tunney went to New York
City in an airplane to participate in
his fight last night with Tom Heeney.
At the time of closing the column we
have not yet heard how the fight
came out, but we hope that Tom
took Gene for another little fligt.
* * *
The reason, of course, is not
that we have anything personal
against Professor Tunney but
that we have a very substantial
bet on Heeney.
As the best lie of the day, we print
the following, gleaned from one of
our great metropolitan dailies:
Shaves Self In 27 Seconds;
Claims It's World Record
LILLE, July 25.-Hubert Carre,
a barber here, today claimed to
have established a world's record
by shaving himself with an old
style razor in 27 seconds. M.
Carre gave himself a twice over
without- one cut or scrape.
* *
that Herbert hoover has de-
to kiss babies as a part of his
>idential campaign, what has the
Republican party left as a platform?
:holy smokes! Another big ex-
ecutive has resigned, the chief of1
police in Chicago. But then, we
nr, could see where the chief
n Chicago did 'Inything,
a:
,. **

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Dial 7561

FRIDAY, JULY 27, 192S
Night Editor-GEORGE E. SIMONS
A VETERAN PASSES

Classified Ads
Pay

The colorful life of one of Michi
ga's outstanding officials wa
brought to a close yesterday in th
passing of Charles S. Pierce, forme
State Senator and for twenty-fiv
years clerk of the House of Repre
sentatives of Michigan. In the pass
ing of Mr. Pierce, who just recentl
reached his seventieth birthday an
niversary, Michigan loses a Vlistin
guished citizen and a most faithfu
official.
Year in and year out Charles Pierce
as clerk of the House, greeted th
sentors and representatives as the
came to Lansing to carry on thei
legislative duties. He was thei
friend, he was their advisor, he wa
their parlimentarian; he saved man
from embarrassment, he schoole
many during the early periods. o
their legislative career. He wa
kind to his clerks. He was huma
to the pages. The whole burden o
routine work connectedwith the de
liberations of the House of Repre
sentatives rested upon his shoulders
;During the months of the legislativ
session his work was endless. Re
porting at his office in the Hous
early in the morning and leaving a
the midnight hour approached, con
stituted the limits of Mr. Pierce'
working days on many occasions.
Through his long years of servic
Mr. Pierce became so thoroughl
identified with the House of Repre
senatives that the mere mention o
any of the many aspects of the wor
of the House to one connection with
the legislature brought about a re
collection of the faithful clerk whose
labors were so faithfully contribute
to the interest of the state that h
dearly loved.
As a graduate of the Michigan Law
school of the class of 1887, this Uni-
versity can feel justly proud of the
invaluable and unselfish services
that this Michigan son has rendered
to his state.
Although he was well equipped to
pursue his legal practice, Mr. Pierce
chose to continue in his position as
House clerk, a position for which he
was admirably fitted and one for
which it will be difficult to find a
successor. The office of clerk of the
House being an elective position on
the part of House members, Mr.
Pierce was never confronted with op-
position for his post, which is one
of the many marked' tributes that
were paid him during his colorful
life as a Michigan official.
FOR BETTER JURIES
A praiseworthy step was taken by
the New York Rotary Club this week
in offering the services of each and
every one of its members for jury
service within the city if the various
courts in need of jurymen so desire
them. This step is taken in view of
the widespread desire, not only dis-
cernable in New York but one which
is getting to be quite rampant
throughout the country, on the part
of citizens to escape jury service. Jury
service is presumably evaded because
of the time that it takes to fulfill
the duties on the panel and because
of the monotony experienced as a
result of hearing the facts of the
many petty cases that are argued be-'
fore jury.,
This move on the part of the Newl

i-
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e
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1-
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r
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If
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STATIONERY

SPECIAL!

200 BOXES ASSORTED AT
25c the box
WA R9SUNIVERSITY

G9 4
Ei

much on the club r.
tives are purely
organizations w
conditions woul
ed.

1' ow'suit
r greatly improv-

HELP t yPANAMA a
"The right . : authority are grant..

. ed to the Un-:. States for the main
e tenance of i 'dc order in the citie
of Panama -d Colon and the t:r
e tories and :arbors adjacent there
in case the Republic of Panama shoui
not be, in the judgment of the Unite(
s States, able to maintain such order,'
reads a section of the original treat
between the United States and Pan
e ama made in 1903.
Y' This mnans that during the comin
elections the United States could sen
f troop's into the Republic of Panam
k in case the police of the republic
h should be unable to maintain public
- peace. The Panama government wil
e do all possible to enforce order b3
d closing saloons, prohibiting the car
e rying of firearms, and patrolling thi
streets.
Conforming to precedent the gov-
ernor of the 'canal Zone will issue
or'ders for ca al employees to remair
in the zone, -:: d the military and na-
val officers - IzI instruct their men in
a like ma: :. The twenty-third in.
faintry, he - -, will be ready to en-
ter the r':- : c in case of disturb-
ance.
Perhaps . the duty of a larger
country to a. o°t a father to younger
republics whe -em a bit unruly, and
American lute K':ence into the affairs
of Central Ali~t.: !ean countries may
be justified in :t way, but it seems
hardly to be uded in the letter
of the Monroe i:. etrine which pro-
vides for protoee t against civil or
military invasion :y foreign coun-
tries.
Even though the eaty grants au-
thority to maintain public order,
American interierenc: n the affairs of
Panann mav be comn i 'ed to the ac-
tion o, rh.0 1 ite' .ic-ra-
gua. Sc icg rs AT i -iiterests
are unmolested it n e better
for the smaller nation be left to
themselve's because it s is that les-
sons learned by bitter e .perience are
the more lasting. The Unitied States,
in her younger days, experienced po-
litical trials without a great deal of
foreign interference and even wag
a great civil war in which
from other nations bad no pa- -
result was a closer relationship
tween the opposing parties. Perhaps
it our smaller nations were allowed
to settle their problems by them'selv-
es, as we were, the solutions would
be more permanent and political sta..
bility would be the result.

40 L

G

On Self-winding
. atch.' ,i V3 as bad as the
nan who wa -_. on a beat.

A ttraction Extraordinary
HENDERSON'S
SrT OMPERS
With Limited Engagement at
BLUE LANTERN
ISLAND LAKE

'escientist in 7:14and has
di,!ered that the n-ieker bee
has srger brain than s t3drone.
S '-people find mo irned
thin 7o worry about.
A man in Illinois tipped a 1' -er
$25 beco.-' his sight was r-" d
after an .tric vibrator appliii.ti':;
to his he . It might have resiored
his sight, ;, . - it lost him his mina.
At a 1-de hour last night no
further r.-ignations from office to
support feople for the presi-
dential r:.ce were reported.
"BUT THE L!EMORY LINGERS ON"
I went to see "The Vikings" Tues-
day night, and tb :e was a woman
behind me who interpreted the play
for all those who couldn't held hear-
ing her. You know that kind. And
I won't say she was an Ibsen ex-
pert, either. Well, anyway, I didn't
mind her until the last scene when
Hjordis jumped into the sea and a
flamp-red clojud rose out of the water,
and the woman behind :ne said:
"Oh, so that's where she went!"
THIS SPACE IS S'IUL RE-
SERVED FOR KERNELas CON-

11

Dancing IN
Except M(

tightly
ondays

America's Greatest Colored Dance Band
A JEAN GOLDKETTE BALLROOM
On Grand River, 12 Miles East of Brighton

I

1 '.

TRIBUTION TO H O L L S.
WHEN WILL IT BE l0 i

i
1.

L

L- - I I

I I

"Skirts will never be any sliarter,':
said the Cynical Summer ;Ifudent
yesterday, "for if they do, they will
be nothing but bibs."
A railway company in 'i's-
souri reported. that it had it
or, of its switch engines. t t
fely backs off the map the
F -- lost an elephant in a
Aug crowd.
And so saying, Lark ripped the
page from the trusty typewriter,
swore softly under his breath, and
said to the office staff in general: "I
feel punk; this is enough for today."
, LARK.

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