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July 16, 1925 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1925-07-16

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'HER

i 4e wameur

ait

TODAY IS:
BARGAIN
DAY

TODAY

No. 23

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, JULY 16, 1925

PRICE FIVE C

/

IENTISTWLL
ESTYTOAY I
TE RESTS CASE WITH ONE
WITNESS, DR. M. N.
METCALF
BJECTION RAISED
,1 Examination Is Completed The
Attornies Will Argue As to
Competency
(By The Associated Press)
ayton, Tenn., July 15.-Argument
> the competency of scientific
nony in the Scopes case will be
e in the court room here tomor-
a development usually expected
artcipants and lookers-on in Day-
The state has rested its case
one scientific witness, Dr. May-
M. Metcalf, forier professor of
igy at Oberlin college.
was on the witness stand for
defense when court adjourned
today.
is testimony however, has not
been made a part of the record
ie case for prosecution attornies
d objection when the questions
volution were asked him and the
was retired from the room. With
ury out of the court room the
ise attornies were permitted to
Dr. Metcalf a number of ques-
concerning the subject, which
as made his life study.
en an examination has been com-
d the attornies will argue the
etency of such testimony. This
'xpected tomorrow. Whether
court will give his decision at
or defer it to a later court day
not known.
1BS TO ASSIST NISH
PLOR~ INEXPEITION
of. W. H. Hobbs of the geology
rtment, who is on his way to Cop-.
gen to confer with Dr. Lauge
, famous Danish explorer, has
spending a short time in Berin
government officials where he
been watching a meteorological
Atigation. Practically all the ex-
nents have been carried on with
ise of balloons and airplanes.
Koch is planning a new ex-
ion into the northern part of
nLiand and he has invited Profes-
Hobbs to assist him in making
arations and plans for the under-
Lg. The expedition will be finan-
by the Danish government.
llowing the completion of his
: in Copenhagen, Professor Hobbs
go to Paris where he will spend
r weeks. He will return to Ann
r in time for the opening of the
ersity in September.
WHAT'S GOING ON
THURSDAY

-Lecture on "Personal Experi-
ces in Epidemics," by Dr. V. C.
ughn in Natural Science auditor-
--Zona Gale's 'Miss Lulu Bett,"
t the Wisconsin Players in the au-
orium of University hall.

AUTO-SUGGESTION

t MORE DADA\_-
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_______________All-
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_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ -- - . - - - - -~ I It '
i d0
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1P /om

NEW REGISTRAR ARRIVES
HERE TO ASSUME DUTIES
Ira Smith, new registrar of the
University, 'arrived in Ann Ar-
bor yesterday to take up his new
duties. He was appointed, by
the Regents to succeed Regis-
trar Arthur G. Hall who died
last spring.
Registrar Smith was formerlyI
registrar of the University of
Chicago, but resigned his post
there to accept Michigan's offer.

ry Cg
SWISCONSIN "GROUP
PRESENTS "MISS
LULU9 BETT" TODAY
WISCONSIN PLAYERS WILL STAGE
ZONA GALE'S PLAY IN
UNIVERSITY HALL
CURTAIN AT 8:15

$325 COLLECTED
INS.1 . . D IV
Need $67 Aore to Carry on Work
During Remainder of Summer
Season, is Report

e
3
t
c
i
I
i
t
,

PHYSI.CIST TO GIVE
FIFTEEN LECTURES
Dr. Foote of the Bureau of Standards
Will Speak Every Day On
Atomic Structure
IS AUTHOR AND EDITOR
Dr. P. D. Foote, research physicist
of the Bureau of Standards, will give
a series of 15 lectures on atomic struc-
ture beginning' at 4 o'clock July 20
in room 1041 of the new Physics
building. He will lecture at 4 o'-
clock Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday,
Thursday, and at 4 and 9 o'clock on
Friday. Dr. Foote will open his ser-
ies with five lectures on "pmplex
Structure of Series Terms."
His other subjects will be "Photo-
Electric Effect in Vapors," "The
Breakdown of Selection Principles,"
"Excited- Atoms," "Polarization of
Resonance Radiation," "Needle Quan-
ta," "The Stern-Gerlach Experiments,"
"Stoner's System of Quantum Num-
bers," "The Relatively Doublet Di-
lemma," and "Quantization of the
Nucleus."
Dr. Foote has made many notable
contributions to the theory of atomic
structure. His experimental research-
es in this field have given him an in-
ternational reputation. He is joint au-
thor with Dr. F. L. Mohler, also of
the Bureau of Standards, of one of
the most widely read texts on atomic
structure. He also is editor of the
Journal of the Optical Society of Am-
erica.

BIreakey, Pattonj
Give Program At
Faculty Concert
The fourth veekly concert in the
series of faculty recitals given in Hill
auditorium Wednesday evenings un-
der the auspices of the University
School of Music, was attended by a
large audience last night. An inter-
esting program was given by James
Breakey, pianist, and Ottis d. Patton,f
tenor.
Mr. Breakey is a member of the
faculty of the Michigan State Norm-I
al college, Ypsilanti, and has won
wide distinction as an artist of rec-
ognized ability.x
Mr. Patton is a graduate.of the Un-1
iversity School of Music and for sev-I
eral years has been associated withf
the Lansing Conservatory of Music.
He is taking special work under Theo-;
dore Harrison this summer and ex-f
pects to continue his study' in Ann
Arbor this fall. He has sung a great
deal in public, not only in Michigan,I
but in Chicago and elsewhere.
Next Wednesday, July 22, there will
be a recital by Max Ewing, guest
pianist, a former student of the School
of Music. Mr. Ewing has won distinc-
tion in the east as a concert pian-
ist.
HOLD LEOGUE PICNIC
AT IWHITMORE LAKE
Swimming, a ball game, and a pic-
nic supper were on the program of
entertainment at the Women's League
picnic which was held from 5 until
8 o'clock last night at Whitmore'
Lake.
Three University trucks drove the
party to the Lake. Refreshments
consisting of potato salad and sand-
wiches, coffee, ice cream and cookies
were served under the trees.
Guests of honor at the affair in-
cluded Dean Jean Hamilton, dean of
women, Miss Jeanette Perry, director
of Betsy Barbour house, Miss Lucy
Elliot, of Helen Newberry residence,
Mrs. Emma G. Quigley, Alumnae
house, and Miss Ethel McCormick,
Miss Ruth Price, and Miss Cleo Murt-
land of the physical education depart-
d ment.

i
,ON AR4T IN POETRHY
English Professor Says Eighteenth
Century Was Not Typical
Era of Prose{
IT WAS AGE OF ART
"One of the main distinctions of1
eighteenth century poetry is that the
second-rate poetry of that period is}
more readable than the second-rate
poetry of any other age," said Prof.
Louis I. Bredvold of the English de-1
partment in his lecture on "The Ele-
ment of Art in Eighteenth Century
Poetry" given in Natural Science au-
ditorium yesterday afternoon.
"A notion often expressed is that
the eighteenth century was one of
reason and, therefore, of prose. This'
is a double error, both in fact and in
theory. That reason was not domin-
ant is shown in the writings of both
Pope and Dryden, which are extreme-
ly emotional. In theory people were
apt to believe that this was a age of
reason, which thus prevented them
from enjoying the real values of the
poetry. If this were true it would
be necessary to rule out a great deal
of what is called art, as Greek sculp-
ture, and the writings of Shakespeare
and Browning."
"Art makes its primary appeal to
the imagination which flows as in ac-
cord. The imagination appreciates
art. Invention or imagination was un-
iversally looked upon by the ancients
as the soul of poetry. This is as
good hypothesis to adopt for the study
of art in eighteenth century poetry."
Coaches' All Star
Team Plays Today
At 6 o'clock tomorrow the coaching
school all-star baseball team will play
the Pratt and Dunn team of City
league in an exhibition game at Ferry
Field. No admission will be charged.
Although quite a number of players
of known baseball ability are in the
coaches' line-up, the team experience
of the Pratt and Dunn organization
should give them the advantage. The
s batteries for the coaches are: Roberts,
--Brown, pitchers, and Cody, Carty,
catchers. O'Hara will pitch for Pratt
and Pratt and Dunn and Edgar will
catch.

1924 RECEIPTS GREATER
The University Fresh Air camp tag
day, which was held on the campus
yesterday, netted a total of $325. Al-
though this amount falls short of the
quota of $400 which was set for the
students of the Summer session, it is
hoped that the remainder of the $1;,000
which is needed to continue the camp
for the rest of the season will be
contributed by townspeople and other
friends of the camp.
Students of the Summer session
last year contributed an amount
slightly in excess of that secured this
year, namely $338.
There were many one dollar gifts
made yesterday, one ten dollar gift,
and one twenty-five dollar gift.
The seventeen boys and four lead-
ers from the camp who sold the tags
on the campus were the' guests of the
Majestic theater last night.
MERCHANTS CLEBRT
BARG AIN DAY TODY"
Ann Arbor's second Bargain and
Gala day will be celebrated today by
price slashing in the stores and by
free vandeville performances and
band concerts in the streets. The af-!
ternoon entertainment will begin at
1:30 o'clock and, althoiigh the stores
will close at the regular hours, activ-
ities and entertainment will continue
starting at 6:30 tonight. Clown per-
formances and seven vaudeville acts
are scheduled in addition to many
other features.
The Ann Arbor merchants, under
the leadership d'nd direction of the
Chamber of Commerce, are cooperat-
ing to make this one of Ann Arbor's
greatest business days.

Original Ending of Play Used By Or.
ganization; Two Hore Plays
Planned This Week
"Miss Lulu Bett" by Zona Gale will
be presented by the Wisconsin Players
at 8:15 o'clock tonight, in University
hall auditorium.
This is Miss Gale's first full length
play, and won for her the Pulitzer
prize as being the best play of Ain-
erican life, when it was produced in
New York a few years ago.hThe play
appeals particularly to the middle
western audiences as its scenes are
laid here in the middle west( and it
portrays accurately the everyday life
around us. This is shown by the
fact that three years ago, when the
Players took it on tour through Wis-
consin and northern Illinois, at each
town the audience thought that some
of the lines or situations were put in
especially for them, in other words,
"local gags." For example, the night-
ly pilgrimages of Diana to the "i-
berry" would find a quick and enthus-
iastic response from the audience in
one town, wile in some other city the
audience would particularly react to
some other incident of the play.
The vicissitudes of the lowly "Iulu"
and her final emergence from intellec.
tual and domestic serfdom made a
quick appeal to the sympathy of each
audience while grouchy "Grandma"
and bullying "Dwight," smug and self-
satisfied, schemed to awaken in each
auditor, memories of "folks" well
known.
As presented on Broadway the play
ended in a more or less conventional
way that was deemed necessary for
"sophisticated" New York audiences.
As given by the Players, the original
and logical ending of the play is used
so that the story is made true tolife
and therefore makes a greater appeal.
Sophocles' "Antigone," one of the
greatest of the classical Greek trag-
edies, will be given tomorrow night,
and "Fashion," a comedy of the nine-
teenth century, written by Anna Cora
Mowatt, Saturday night.
D0,R.UGKN TO SPEAKm
TODAY ON PIDEMICS
Dr. V. C. Vaughn, Dean of the De-
partment of Medicine and Surgery
from 1891 to 1921, will lecture on
"Personal Experiences in Epidemics"
at five o'clock this afternoon in Nat-
ural Science auditorium. Doctor
Vaughan has had a wide experience in
the field of epidemics and his lecture
promises to be one of interest to the
non-professional as well as to the pro-
fessional man.
For a period of over forty-five
years, Doctor Vaughn was a member
of the faculty of the Medical School
in the capacity of instructor, profess-
or and dean.
Wire Flashes
Angers, France, July 15.-The con-
"jition- of Mine.' Caillaux, wife of the
finance minister, who suffered injur-
ies when her automobile crashed into
a tree Sunday, was described as sat-
isfactory in a medical bulletin this
morning.
Muskegon, July 15.-Robert Dunn,
assistant prosecuting attorney and a
former member of- the Michigan Var-
sity football eleven, was elected a
member of the Muskegon Heights
board of education:

Another College
Gets Young Man
Fo r President
I - .-

FRIDAY
'Sophocles "Ant one" will be
ented by the Wisconsin Players
.e auditorium of University hall.
work of distributing several
nd tons of war materials cap-
by the American army in the
war to all sections of the coun-
gan last night at the army base
t Newark.
B. Shaw, general secretary of
lumni association, left Tuesday
w York City where he will at-
meeting of the general adver-
committee of the Alumni asso-

HOLD RECEPTION IN
PHYSICS LABORATORY
A "seance" and reception for grad-
uate and research students in physics,
and their wives, was given at 8
o'clock last night in the Physics lab-
oratory.
The guests were invited to inspect
the laboratories and the research
rooms were open for the evening.
Washington, July 15.-Mrs. Elsie
Hadley White, wife of Frank White,
treasurer of the United States, diedl
suddenly yesterday of cerebal hem-I
orrhage after severaweeks' illness
with heart trouble.

Prof. Henry M. Wriston, history de-
partment Wesleyan university, has
been named president of Lawrence
college, Appleton, Wis. He is 35.
Clarence C. Little, just named head
of the University of Michigan is con-
sidered young for that post.

Muskegon, July 15. -Many citizens
thronged the city commission chamber
last night to protest against the sale
and removal of Pigeon Hill, largest of
the Lake Michigan sand dunes.
Dance at Union Friday Nite.

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